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New Rodent Virus Found In US

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Feb 24, 2018 in Rat News
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This morning experts are warning people with pet rats that a deadly virus that can spread to humans is hitting the U.S. for the first time.

Doctors in the U.S. and Canada confirmed cases of the rodent born Seoul virus.

Rats show no symptom, but it can be dangerous, or even deadly to humans.

Patients can display signs of liver and kidney failure.

So far, 24 people in the U.S. have been infected with the virus three have been hospitalized.

Experts said one of the best ways to avoid catching the virus is to practice good hand hygiene and disinfect rat cages often.

Article source: http://5newsonline.com/2018/02/13/new-rodent-virus-found-in-u-s/

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Quails in duck sauce buckets, stray pigs all in a day’s work at Forever Paws

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Feb 23, 2018 in Rat News
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“They have taken everything we have thrown their way,” said Fall River Animal Control Supervisor Cindy Berard.

FALL RIVER — Things have always been bustling at the no-kill shelter Forever Paws, but it’s definitely been busier and more interesting since the city contracted with the non-profit organization last July.

By the sound of it, both sides couldn’t be happier with the new arrangement.

“Fall River has proven to be a cornucopia of different kinds of animals,” said Casey Fredette, the shelter’s administrator.

In addition to the usual cats and dogs brought to the shelter by the Fall River animal control officers, Forever Paws has taken in chinchillas, ferrets, pet rats, mice and snakes.

“My favorite was four stray quails,” said Fredette. “They were young and they were little and left in a 5-gallon duck sauce bucket at the side of the road.”

Fredette was able to get the baby birds to a wildlife rehab facility.

“They have taken everything we have thrown their way,” said Fall River Animal Control Supervisor Cindy Berard. “We are super impressed with them. A lot of fun too, they’re nice people.”

Fredette has a background in wildlife, so all the wild animals that Berard and her staff of two officers encounter — like possums, raccoons and pigeons, lots of pigeons — can find refuge through Forever Paws.

Last year, the shelter also housed a stray pig from New Bedford they named Kevin Bacon, who was adopted and renamed Abraham.

For a decade the city’s animal control officers had to travel to New Bedford to deliver the animals, but with Forever Paws located on Lynwood Street, the lost pets are reunited with their families in a day or two, Fredette said.

In addition to taking in Fall River’s stray and lost animals, Forever Paws contracts with Westport and New Bedford.

According to Fredette, in 2017 the shelter brought in 882 animals with 559 adoptions. This month alone, the shelter has had 40 adoptions.

Out of the three communities, Forever Paws reunited 165 pets with their families.

Forever Paws President Gail Furtado said there is another fact she and her staff can be proud of.

The national standard to be considered a no-kill shelter is a 90 percent live-release rate.

“We are over 97 percent, according to our statistics,” said Furtado.

She credits Fredette with being proactive getting the word out about their animals waiting to be adopted.

One-third of the funding that keeps the shelter in operation comes from fundraising, said Furtado.

“We have a lot of events coming up, and I have a great fundraising committee,” Furtado said.

The shelter counts on lots of volunteers not just caring for animals, but doing community outreach, like in nursing homes and schools with therapy dogs.

“That’s another thing we’re doing, is giving back to the community. I think it’s very important that we do that. But right now our needs are, well of course, our needs are always about money. If we could get rid of our mortgage that would be very helpful, but we manage to make it,” Furtado said.

Other needs, Furtado said, include the shelter looking for foster homes for their cats. On her wish list is to find a veterinarian who would be willing to work on occasion to do wellness checks on the animals.

“We have a lot going on and we’re really proud of that,” Furtado said, adding that people can follow Forever Paws on their website and Facebook page.

Forever Paws is located at 300 Lynwood St.; call them at 508-677-9154.

Email Jo C. Goode at jgoode@heraldnews.com.

Article source: http://www.heraldnews.com/news/20180222/quails-in-duck-sauce-buckets-stray-pigs-all-in-days-work-at-forever-paws

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Rats, ballerinas and a Bernedoodle dazzle in San Juan Capistrano’s Kids’ Pet Parade

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Feb 22, 2018 in Rat News
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Jenna Rajamaki wore a “Rats Rule” shirt to the San Juan Capistrano Fiesta Association’s 2018 Kids’ Pet Parade on Saturday, Feb. 17, with the intended result.

Her pet rats, Gizmo and Stripe, charmed the judges, who awarded them first prize in the “exotic pets” division of the parade held in in Los Rios Park.

But it was Haven Harris and her dog, Ava, both dressed as ballerinas, who won over the judges’ best over all. Haven and Ava captured first prize in the “best costumes” division plus the grand prize at the pet parade, an invitation to appear as celebrities in the Fiesta de las Golondrinas’ 60th annual Swallows Day Parade.

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That event, billed as one of America’s largest non-motorized parades, will be at 11 a.m. March 24 through downtown San Juan Capistrano, celebrating the annual return of swallows, a swarm of migratory birds that fly for 30 days every spring from South America to California to build nests and spend their summers in San Juan and nearby.

Some 20 entries paraded through Los Rios Park to compete in this year’s pet parade, and it wasn’t just kids with pets this time. The fiesta association added a “Kid at Heart” division for for pet owners 60 years or older. Boots Leone and his dog, Batgirl, took the win in that division.

In the domestic pet division, Nia Dodd and Mocha were the judges’ favorites.

The judges gave a special prize, the Deputy Dog award, to Tatum Grebe and her Bernedoodle, Max, not just because Bernedoodle is such a cool name but because Tatum was dressed as a cowgirl in a town where horse culture is huge and equestrians area a big part of the Swallows Day Parade.

The Kids’ Pet Parade was one in a series of events running up to the March 24 parade. Next event is the El Presidente Ball, a 6 to 10 p.m. gala dinner with live music and dancing on March 17 at El Adobe Restaurant celebrating San Juan’s place in the birth of California and the state’s early history. Many of the attendees will dress in early California attire.

Tickets are $65 in advance and $75 at the door if still available then.

Visit swallowsparade.com for details and tickets or call 949-493-1976.

Article source: http://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/20/rats-ballerinas-and-a-bernedoodle-dazzle-in-san-juan-capistranos-kids-pet-parade/

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Pet rats left for dead in cage dumped in a Leicester car park

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Feb 21, 2018 in Rat News
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RSPCA officers are looking for a new home for a for a pack of pet rats that were left for dead in a Leicester car park.

A cramped cage carrying four young male rats was dumped in a bush behind a block of flats in Stoneygate Avenue with no food or water.

The abandoned rats were found by a member of the public on Sunday February 11.

The RSPCA was called and animal collection officer Greg Hagen collected the two-month old rodents.

Staff caring for them have named the rats Bodger, Badger, Mash and Potato after the popular 90s children’s TV programme.

Mr Hagen said: “These four young rats were found in a very small cage which had been dumped in a bush in a car park in Leicester.

“Apart from mites and fleas, the rats are physically fine and seem healthy.

“They are wary of people so it seems like they haven’t been handled very much so far.

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Can you help RSPCA?

“They were in a very small cage when they were found but have now been moved to a bigger cage where they can explore and start settling into the life at the centre with a predictable routine, which will all help to ease their nervousness a little bit.

“There is never an excuse to abandon an animal in this way.

“The four little rats were lucky they were found by a kind passer-by who contacted the RSPCA otherwise the outlook could have been very bleak for these animals who had been dumped and exposed to the elements.”

Can you offer these rats a home?

The RSPCA is now looking for new a new home for the furry foursome.

They will need an experienced owner who can give them the handling they need to build up their confidence and get them used to human contact.

They will also need large accommodation with plenty of enrichment to keep them entertained.

They would also like be re-homed as a group.

Mr Hagen said: “Rats are intelligent and highly social animals.

“They have an excellent sense of touch and smell and usually live for about two years but some may live longer.

“They have complex needs but providing their needs are met, rats are incredibly rewarding animals to look after and can form close human-animal bonds with their carers.”

Can you offer these rats a home?

The RSPCA is now appealing for information from anyone who may have seen anything in Stoneygate Avenue in Leicester, on Sunday, February 11, at about 12.30pm, to contact the RSPCA appeal line on 0300 123 8018.

For more information or to give Bodger, Badger, Mash and Potato a forever home contact the RSPCA Northamptonshire branch on 01604 881317.

Article source: https://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/leicester-news/pet-rats-left-dead-cage-1238418

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A deadly virus that rats can spread to humans is hitting breeders and …

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Feb 15, 2018 in Rat News
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pet rat

Audrey/Flickr Creative Commons

  • A dangerous virus that can cause kidney failure and death is spreading to rat owners in the US and Canada.
  • So far, 24 people have been infected with ‘Seoul virus’ and three have been hospitalized.
  • One of the best ways to avoid catching the virus from a pet rat is to practice good hand-washing.


People with pet rats should practice safe rodent handling and good hand hygiene to avoid catching a virus that can jump from rats to humans, infectious disease experts warn.

For the first time, doctors in the US and Canada have confirmed cases of rodent-born Seoul virus spreading from pet rats to humans. Rats show no symptoms of the virus, but it can be very dangerous for people, and in severe cases, it’s deadly.

In December 2016, a Wisconsin-based rat-breeder with around 100 Norway rats at home was hospitalized with fever and a low white blood cell count. The patient displayed signs of possible liver and kidney damage, and ultimately tested positive for Seoul virus, according to
a February report
from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The CDC’s
Janna Kerins
, who coauthored the report, told Reuters that “the outbreak spread from sales or trade of infected pet rats between people’s homes or between ratteries” – places where rats are bred – in 11 states.

Researchers identified 24 people in the US and Canada who developed acute Seoul virus infections after contact with pet rats. Eight became ill, and three were hospitalized but recovered, Kerins said.

Seoul virus is a type of hantavirus found in Norway rats, one of the most common varieties of rats in the United States. Although the virus does not cause symptoms in rats, infected rodents will host and shed the virus for life. People with Seoul virus infections often have no or mild flu-like symptoms, but “kidney failure or death can occur in rare cases,” said Kerins.

Rats can spread the virus to humans through infectious saliva, urine, droppings, or aerosolization from contaminated bedding, the CDC reports. Experts don’t think the virus can spread from person to person, and stress that transmission from rats to humans is also rare. Health experts say adults should disinfect rat cages routinely with a 10% bleach solution or disinfectant.

“This is a good reminder that rats and other rodents can carry hantavirus without looking sick, so it is important for owners of pet rats to be aware of the risk for Seoul virus infection, and to practice good hand hygiene . . . such as washing hands after handling rodents and before preparing food, and by avoiding rat bites and scratches,” Kerins said.

Healthcare providers should consider Seoul virus infection in patients with compatible symptoms and rat contact, the authors wrote. Tests are available from the CDC as well as commercial labs. Physicians and other medical providers should contact their state or local health department when they suspect a patient has a Seoul virus infection.

Reuters reporting by Shereen Lehman.

Article source: https://www.businessinsider.in/a-deadly-virus-that-rats-can-spread-to-humans-is-hitting-breeders-and-pet-owners-in-the-us-for-the-first-time/articleshow/62892670.cms

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Pet rats spread deadly Seoul virus in US and Canada for the first …

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Feb 14, 2018 in Rat News
Closed

Audrey/Flickr Creative Commons

  • A dangerous virus that can cause kidney failure and death is spreading to rat owners in the US and Canada.
  • So far, 24 people have been infected with ‘Seoul virus’ and three have been hospitalized.
  • One of the best ways to avoid catching the virus from a pet rat is to practice good hand-washing.

People with pet rats should practice safe rodent handling and good hand hygiene to avoid catching a virus that can jump from rats to humans, infectious disease experts warn.

For the first time, doctors in the US and Canada have confirmed cases of rodent-born Seoul virus spreading from pet rats to humans. Rats show no symptoms of the virus, but it can be very dangerous for people, and in severe cases, it’s deadly.

In December 2016, a Wisconsin-based rat-breeder with around 100 Norway rats at home was hospitalized with fever and a low white blood cell count. The patient displayed signs of possible liver and kidney damage, and ultimately tested positive for Seoul virus, according to a February report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The CDC’s Janna Kerins, who coauthored the report, told Reuters that “the outbreak spread from sales or trade of infected pet rats between people’s homes or between ratteries” — places where rats are bred — in 11 states.

Researchers identified 24 people in the US and Canada who developed acute Seoul virus infections after contact with pet rats. Eight became ill, and three were hospitalized but recovered, Kerins said.

Seoul virus is a type of hantavirus found in Norway rats, one of the most common varieties of rats in the United States. Although the virus does not cause symptoms in rats, infected rodents will host and shed the virus for life. People with Seoul virus infections often have no or mild flu-like symptoms, but “kidney failure or death can occur in rare cases,” said Kerins.

Rats can spread the virus to humans through infectious saliva, urine, droppings, or aerosolization from contaminated bedding, the CDC reports. Experts don’t think the virus can spread from person to person, and stress that transmission from rats to humans is also rare. Health experts say adults should disinfect rat cages routinely with a 10% bleach solution or disinfectant.

“This is a good reminder that rats and other rodents can carry hantavirus without looking sick, so it is important for owners of pet rats to be aware of the risk for Seoul virus infection, and to practice good hand hygiene . . . such as washing hands after handling rodents and before preparing food, and by avoiding rat bites and scratches,” Kerins said.

Healthcare providers should consider Seoul virus infection in patients with compatible symptoms and rat contact, the authors wrote. Tests are available from the CDC as well as commercial labs. Physicians and other medical providers should contact their state or local health department when they suspect a patient has a Seoul virus infection.

Reuters reporting by Shereen Lehman.

Article source: http://www.businessinsider.com/r-seoul-virus-can-jump-from-pet-rats-to-owners-2018-2

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A deadly virus that rats can spread to humans is hitting breeders and pet owners in the US for the first time

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Feb 13, 2018 in Rat News
Closed

Audrey/Flickr Creative Commons

  • A dangerous virus that can cause kidney failure and death is spreading to rat owners in the US and Canada.
  • So far, 24 people have been infected with ‘Seoul virus’ and three have been hospitalized.
  • One of the best ways to avoid catching the virus from a pet rat is to practice good hand-washing.

People with pet rats should practice safe rodent handling and good hand hygiene to avoid catching a virus that can jump from rats to humans, infectious disease experts warn.

For the first time, doctors in the US and Canada have confirmed cases of rodent-born Seoul virus spreading from pet rats to humans. Rats show no symptoms of the virus, but it can be very dangerous for people, and in severe cases, it’s deadly.

In December 2016, a Wisconsin-based rat-breeder with around 100 Norway rats at home was hospitalized with fever and a low white blood cell count. The patient displayed signs of possible liver and kidney damage, and ultimately tested positive for Seoul virus, according to a February report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The CDC’s Janna Kerins, who coauthored the report, told Reuters that “the outbreak spread from sales or trade of infected pet rats between people’s homes or between ratteries” — places where rats are bred — in 11 states.

Researchers identified 24 people in the US and Canada who developed acute Seoul virus infections after contact with pet rats. Eight became ill, and three were hospitalized but recovered, Kerins said.

Seoul virus is a type of hantavirus found in Norway rats, one of the most common varieties of rats in the United States. Although the virus does not cause symptoms in rats, infected rodents will host and shed the virus for life. People with Seoul virus infections often have no or mild flu-like symptoms, but “kidney failure or death can occur in rare cases,” said Kerins.

Rats can spread the virus to humans through infectious saliva, urine, droppings, or aerosolization from contaminated bedding, the CDC reports. Experts don’t think the virus can spread from person to person, and stress that transmission from rats to humans is also rare. Health experts say adults should disinfect rat cages routinely with a 10% bleach solution or disinfectant.

“This is a good reminder that rats and other rodents can carry hantavirus without looking sick, so it is important for owners of pet rats to be aware of the risk for Seoul virus infection, and to practice good hand hygiene . . . such as washing hands after handling rodents and before preparing food, and by avoiding rat bites and scratches,” Kerins said.

Healthcare providers should consider Seoul virus infection in patients with compatible symptoms and rat contact, the authors wrote. Tests are available from the CDC as well as commercial labs. Physicians and other medical providers should contact their state or local health department when they suspect a patient has a Seoul virus infection.

Reuters reporting by Shereen Lehman.

Article source: http://www.businessinsider.com/r-seoul-virus-can-jump-from-pet-rats-to-owners-2018-2

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VOCM – Two Displaced After Cashin Avenue Fire

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Feb 12, 2018 in Rat News
Closed

Two people have been displaced by an overnight fire in a small bungalow containing two apartments in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador.

St. John’s Regional crews were called to a fire on Cashin Avenue just after midnight last night. Platoon Chief Rick DeHaan said that firefighters were alerted to the blaze by a resident of the home, and arrived a short time later to find the fire in a bedroom.

It was quickly brought under control but the rear unit of the two-apartment home sustained fire, smoke, and water damage, while the second apartment was smoke damaged.

There were no reported injuries to occupants of either apartment, and two cats were rescued by firefighters. Several pet rats were also brought from the burning home by their owner.

Disaster volunteers with the Canadian Red Cross are helping a man from one apartment and a woman from the other unit with emergency lodging, food, clothing purchases and other basics.

Photos by Earl Noble

Article source: http://vocm.com/news/two-displaced-after-cashin-avenue-fire/

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CDC Identifies Seoul Virus Outbreak Among Pet Rat Owners

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Feb 10, 2018 in Rat News
Closed

These are the first known cases of individuals catching the virus from their pets in Canada or the U.S.

By Diana Kwon | February 6, 2018

Article source: https://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/51561/title/CDC-Identifies-Seoul-Virus-Outbreak-Among-Pet-Rat-Owners/

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Dog left heartbroken after his rodent best mate dies | Metro News

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Feb 9, 2018 in Rat News
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This dog and rat had a more beautiful friendship than you'll ever know
This could be you but you’re not a rat (Picture: Mercury)

When you find a friend that makes your heart sing, it’s the best feeling in the world.

The first person you think of when you see a funny meme, the one you call when you’re in a crisis, that pal you always have a good time with.

A dog and a rat found just that when they first met three years ago, becoming totally inseparable despite the canine companion being a Puggle (a Beagle/Pug cross) and Beagles normally being used to hunt rodents.

Puggle Pippin and rat Leia became buddies when owners Hayley Lopez, 22, and Tyler Lopez, 21, brought the rat home three years ago.

Pippin swapped hunting for snuggling and became firm friends with Leia, playing hide and seek, and cuddling on the sofa.

Hayley shared the below footage – which shows them playfully chasing each other around their owners’ lounge, and Leia affectionately nibbling Pippin’s tail – after Leia sadly passed away a couple of months ago.

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Hayley, from Washington State, US, said: ‘They were best buddies.

‘I work in a pet shop and Leia was the last one in the litter so I brought her home. It was the best decision I ever made.

‘Pippin would not stop staring at the cage. He was so interested. I took Leia out and put her on the couch and Pippin just ran over and started playing.

‘Leia really liked to nibbling on Pippin’s toenails and Pippin would jump around and she would go for his feet.

‘They would always chase each other around. They were best friends and attached at the hip.

‘Pippin would watch the cage and it was like they would be having a conversation.’

Just having a chat (Picture: Mercury Press)

‘They used to sit on the sofa together and when she was tired she would lie on him, Pippin would lightly rest his head on her while she slept,” Hayley continues.

‘They would play hide and seek. She would hide behind the pillow and Pippin would look for her. It was really cute.

‘They were just buds. They were the best.

‘Pippin would recognise Leia’s name. I used to ask him if he wanted to play with her and he would run to the cage and wait for her to play.

‘He would wag his tail and watch for her then she would jump out of her cage and run over to him.

‘He was always so gentle when he was running around with her.’

Kisses and cuddles with BFF (Picture: Mercury Press)

Hayley works in a pet shop and breeds rats – she even has 12 pet rats at home.

Was she nervous having a dog with hunting instincts around Leia?

‘Pippin’s got a super personality and has never tried to harm any animal,’ she says.

‘It’s quite unusual because he is part beagle and they are used to hunt rats.

‘I was nervous about that at first but he’s never tried anything. I think he’s more Pug than Beagle. He does not have a hunting bone in his body.’

‘I kiss your head, okay’ (Picture: Mercury)

When Leia died, Pippin was left heartbroken.

‘When she passed away he would still watch the cage and would get really sad when she did not come by,’ reveals Hayley.

‘He went out to her grave in the back yard. He really felt her loss.

‘I think he could smell her. He went over to the grave and would not leave. He sat there in the rain for about half an hour. I think he was saying goodbye.’

Hayley says Pippin has befriended one of the babies in a new litter of rats, but it’s just not the same.

‘There was a baby in that litter called Toriyama who he’s starting to bond with but it’s not as strong,’ she says.

Rest in peace, sweet Leia. Until you and Pippin meet again.

MORE: Everything you need to know about burying your dead pet

MORE: Disabled dachshund is given a set of skis so she can get around in the snow

MORE: It’s OK and natural to grieve for your pet

Article source: http://metro.co.uk/2018/02/09/dog-left-heartbroken-rodent-best-mate-dies-7299379/

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