Page 2 of the Pets archive.

Abandoned Pet Rats In Animal Cruelty Case Now Available For …

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Jan 4, 2018 in Rat News
Closed

Will President Trump Last Another Year? – Rasmussen Reports®

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Jan 3, 2018 in Rat News
Closed

Will President Trump Last Another Year?

Sign up for free daily updates

Saturday, December 09, 2017

Some political experts doubted that Donald J. Trump would tough it out this long. This, after all, was a very strange man, possibly afflicted by obsessive-compulsive disorder to the point that he even floated the idea of staying in New York.   

He moved to Washington. But Trump’s dangerous old compulsions remain: Twitter diarrhea. Impulsiveness. Recklessness. He insults adversaries whose cooperation he needs. He’s allergic to compromise. Will these character defects destroy him politically in 2018?   

The odds of Trump remaining president by the end of next year, I said recently, were significantly less than 50 percent. I still think that’s true. But as noted above, we have a tendency to underestimate this highly inestimable man. The will-Trump-survive question is an equation with many variables.   

One thing is clear: “The Resistance,” as the left-center political forces aligned against Trump and the Republicans grandiosely call themselves, is a null force. If Trump is forced out of office, it won’t have much to do with these Hillary Clinton supporters. The Resistance’s street activism peaked out with the Women’s March on January 21, 2017. They are, in Trumpspeak, Losers.   

Russiagate, the allegation that Putin’s government “hacked the election” for Trump, still hasn’t risen above the level of a 9/11 Truther conspiracy theory.   

But Russiagate led to the appointment of special counsel Robert Mueller. Mueller’s sweeping powers and authority to pursue any wrongdoing he finds regardless of whether or not it’s related to Russian interference with the 2016 presidential election has already led to the downfall and flipping of ex-Trump national security advisor Michael Flynn.   

Mueller’s pet rats may never turn up a smoking-gun connection between Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump. But they likely know where Trump’s bodies are buried. In addition to obstruction of justice — to which Trump de facto pled guilty in one of his insipid tweets — charges related to sleazy business dealings are a strong possibility. Was/is Trump in deep with Russian oligarchs and corrupt government officials? Perhaps not — but he’s an amoral real estate developer who follows money wherever it leads, including authoritarian regimes where transparency is nonexistent.   

Behind every great fortune, Balzac wrote, there is a crime. Trump’s cash hoard probably results from many more than a single illegal act.   

Impeachment or resignation? Having researched Trump for my 2016 biography, Trump is more likely to give away his fortune to charity than slink away in a Nixonian resignation. His ego is too big; he’s too pugnacious. He’d rather get dragged out kicking and screaming — unless it’s part of a deal with Mueller or other feds to avoid prosecution.   

So impeachment it would need to be.   

But no political party in control of both houses of Congress has ever impeached a sitting president of its own party. And there’s another powerful countervailing force protecting Trump from impeachment: Republicans’ self-preservation instinct.  

GOP lawmakers suffered devastating losses in the 1974 midterm election following Nixon’s near-impeachment/resignation. Democrats did OK in 1998, after Bill Clinton was impeached — but that was an outlier impacted by the biggest boom economy ever.  

In the long term, the Republican Party would probably be better off without Trump. But Congressmen and Senators live in the here and now. Here and now, or more precisely in 2018, Republicans know that many of them would lose their jobs following a Trump impeachment.   

Despite those considerations, I think that, in the end, House Speaker Paul Ryan, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and other top Republicans are more likely to calculate that pulling the impeachment trigger is worth the likely losses in the fall.   

Reason No. 1 is personal: Paul Ryan’s presidential ambitions. As I speculated in February, I believe Ryan wants to be president in 2020. As Speaker of the House, he’s the one person who can launch impeachment proceedings. I can easily imagine the following quid pro quo: Ryan gets rid of Trump, Pence agrees not to run in 2020, Ryan runs with Pence’s endorsement.   

Reason No. 2 is meta: to save the Republican Party as Ryan and McConnell know it. Here’s what I said in February: “Becoming the party of impeachment at a time when impeachment is popular transforms crisis into opportunity, allowing Republicans to cleanse their Trump-era sins (trying to repeal the increasingly well-received Obamacare, paying for the Great Wall of Mexico with deficit spending, etc.) and seize the moral high ground in one swoop. Vice President Mike Pence takes the helm, steadies the ship, promotes their right-wing agenda with more grace than his former boss, and Ryan and his buddies prepare for 2020.”   

If anything, the GOP is in bigger trouble now.   

Trump’s approval ratings hover between 35 percent and 40percent. More worrisome for him and the Republicans, his support is shaky while those who hate him are firmly entrenched in their beliefs.  

Approval of the Republican Party has hit 29 percent, the lowest ever recorded.  

After failing to repeal Obamacare, the Republicans finally scored their first legislative victory last week when the Senate passed a sweeping series of tax cuts — but it’s wildly unpopular.   

GOP elders were already fretting that Trump was ruining the GOP brand following the alt-right riots in Charlottesville. What they’re about to realize (if they haven’t already) is that the president has also undermined one of the party’s strongest longstanding arguments: “The government should be run like a great American company,” as Jared Kushner said in March. “Our hope is that we can achieve successes and efficiencies for our customers, who are the citizens.”  

Voters have watched Trump’s staff churn through one resignation and shakeup after another, the president diss his own sitting cabinet members, with no sign of his campaign’s stated goals being talked about, much less executed. The Trump Administration has been characterized by communication breakdowns, chaos, mismanagement and waste — and has little to show for its efforts.   

This is the current face of the Republican Party: corrupt, stupid and inept. Ryan and McConnell know they must disassociate the GOP from Trump.   

They have to destroy their party in order to save it.   

Ted Rall (Twitter: @tedrall) is co-author, with Harmon Leon, of “Meet the Deplorables: Infiltrating Trump America,” an inside look at the American far right, out December 12th. You can support Ted’s hard-hitting political cartoons and columns and see his work first by sponsoring his work on Patreon.

COPYRIGHT 2017 CREATORS.COM

See Other Political Commentaries.

See Other Commentaries by Ted Rall.

Views expressed in this column are those of the author, not those of Rasmussen Reports. Comments about this content should be directed to the author or syndicate.


Rasmussen Reports is a media company specializing in the collection,
publication and distribution of public opinion information.

We conduct public opinion polls on a variety of topics to inform our audience on events
in the news and other topics of interest. To ensure editorial control and independence,
we pay for the polls ourselves and generate revenue through the sale of subscriptions,
sponsorships, and advertising. Nightly polling on politics, business and lifestyle topics
provides the content to update the Rasmussen Reports web site many times each day.
If it’s in the news, it’s in our polls. Additionally, the data drives a
daily update newsletter and various media outlets
across the country.

Some information, including the Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll
and commentaries are available for free to the general public.
Subscriptions are available for $4.95 a month or 34.95 a year
that provide subscribers with exclusive access to more than 20 stories per week on upcoming elections,
consumer confidence, and issues that affect us all. For those who are really into the numbers,
Platinum Members can review demographic crosstabs
and a full history of our data.

To learn more about our methodology, click here.

Article source: http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/political_commentary/commentary_by_ted_rall/will_president_trump_last_another_year

Tags: , , , , ,

Abandoned Pet Rats In Animal Cruelty Case Now Available For Adoption

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Jan 2, 2018 in Rat News
Closed

Pamelia woman accused of torturing animal

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Jan 1, 2018 in Rat News
Closed

<!–

var articlecredit = [];
var articlecaption = [];
var articleimage = [];

–>

WATERTOWN — State police charged Elieen Lee-Cloot, 74, of Pamelia, with torturing, injuring or not feeding an animal on Friday.

Details were not available. Ms. Lee-Cloot, charged at 5:20 p.m. on Route 37, Pamelia, was later released with an appearance ticket for a local court.

Article source: http://www.watertowndailytimes.com/news03/pamelia-woman-accused-of-torturing-animal-20171226

Tags: , , , , ,

Alaska has far too many impractical cats | Kaplan Herald

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 31, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

In “Old Possum‘s Book of Practical Cats” – the poetic inspiration for the Tony Award-winning musical “Cats” – T. S. Eliot who is “always deceiving you into believing that he‘s only hunting for mice.”

Eliot‘s light verse portrays another cat as “a fiend in feline shape, a monster of depravity” who‘s called “the Hidden Paw.” These feline character studies were intended to be clever and humorous.

However, there really is a dark side to cats. Over the past 40 years the number of domestic cats in the United States has tripled. Cats are now believed to be the most abundant predator in the Lower 48 states, with an estimated 96 million in homes and credible estimates of feral and stray cats ranging from 30 million to 80 million.

[Related:]

This proliferation of pets has had unforeseen consequences for wild birds.

Truth is, there are practical cats and impractical cats. Practical cats are those who only kill pests like house mice, rats and the occasional wild voles or shrews that find their way inside our homes and other buildings.

Impractical cats are feral or free-ranging animals that kill billions of wild birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians every year. Our world is inhabited by far too many impractical cats.

It is illegal to release cats into the wild in Alaska. Nevertheless, the law is not well enforced, many abandoned and free-ranging cats are fed outdoors by people, and regular feeding stations can become cat colonies.

A “rescue group for animals with special needs” is asking state and local governments to legalize the proliferation of feral cat colonies in Alaska.

Mojo‘s Hope has submitted a proposal to the Alaska Board of Game to drop “sterilized feral cats” from the state‘s list of domestic animals that cannot be released into the wild without a permit. [Read here] The board begins a week-long meeting in Anchorage on Friday.

Allowing people to release cats and feed colonies of feral cats outdoors is a very bad idea.

‘A fiend in feline shape‘

Despite the purring assurances of Mr. Mistoffelees, cats kill a lot of wild animals.

Even when a cat merely bites or claws a bird, it often dies because bacteria on a cat‘s gums and teeth are lethal. Karen Munday, a specialist at a wildlife treatment center in Portland, Oregon, says “.”

Hundreds of scientific studies have documented local numbers of wild birds and mammals killed by cats. A meta-study conducted by Scott Loss, Tom Will and Peter Marra in 2013 combined the best of these studies into in the United States alone.

Merging the estimates of cat populations with a range of estimates for kill rates, the researchers concluded that cats kill 1.3 to 4 billion birds and 6.3 to 22.3 billion mammals annually. Billion. With a “b.”

‘The Hidden Paw‘

The Municipality of Anchorage, including 700-square-mile Chugach State Park, has far more cats than all wild predators combined.

According to Anchorage Animal Control, which uses the American Veterinary Medical Association calculation tool,  Anchorage has. That doesn‘t include feral cats.

By some estimates one-fourth to one-third of North America‘s domestic cats are allowed to roam freely and are considered to be feral or stray cats. The Humane Society of the United States and several scientific studies have estimated a community‘s feral cat population at , which suggests approximately 30,000 feral cats in Anchorage.

Thus, a conservative estimate for the combined total of domestic and feral cats in Anchorage is about 103,000 cats.

Multiplying that figure with the lowest estimates for mortality rates in the national meta-study yields an estimate of 1,148,000 birds and 5,975,000 mammals killed by cats in Anchorage each year.

If this estimate seems high to you, ponder this: with as many as 103,000 cats, the estimated kill averages about 11 birds per cat annually. Some pet cats kill no birds, but it takes no stretch of the imagination to realize that many cats, particularly feral cats, kill more than one bird a month. I suspect this estimate is low.

It‘s the sheer number of cats that is driving the high kill estimates. This unnatural drain on wild birds is a relatively recent phenomenon. There were no house cats in the western hemisphere before 1492.

And as long as those cats are roaming around outside, they are killing birds and other wildlife. Even well fed cats hunt.

Hoarders without borders

Most TNR advocates aren‘t scientists. They just love cats. And they repeat the feel-good nostrums concocted by the most vocal proponents like Becky Robinson, president of Alley Cat Allies.

Alley Cat Allies claims to be an “advocate for all animals,” but the organization has a laser-like focus on feral cats, while essentially ignoring their impacts on other animals and people. Not doctors without borders, but hoarders without borders.

Alley Cat Allies claims that “outdoor cats are part of our natural landscape” and “their home is the outdoors – just like squirrels, chipmunks, and birds.” If cats are “natural,” then dogs and rats are natural. Are we ready for feral dog colonies?

Feral rat colonies?

Hold on, feral rat colonies are already a thing.

I‘ve found seven instances in North America where a person was harboring anywhere from 200 to 2,000 uncaged rats in their home. Last year 600 pet rats were taken from an Ontario woman‘s one-bedroom apartment and – here‘s the best part – put up for adoption by local humane societies. As it happened, because many were pregnant when surrendered to authorities.

Does this sound crazy to you? It‘s no crazier than maintaining a feral cat colony. Perhaps cat people and rat people are two sides of the same coin. Interestingly, both insist that their favored pet won‘t harm the environment.

Robinson and Alley Cat Allies insist that free-roaming cats are not a threat to bird populations. They come to this conclusion only by ignoring or disagreeing with every bird expert who believes otherwise, and there are a lot of them, not “a small group” as Alley Cat Allies claims. A new study technique, affixing “kitty cams” to individual cats, is revealing even more kills than previously thought.

Attempting to obfuscate the issue, TNR advocates insist that most birds are killed by human-related causes, like pollution, towers, and windows. They seldom acknowledge that cats themselves are a human-related source of mortality. When the 2013 meta-study demonstrated that cats are a greater source of bird mortality than all other human causes combined, Robinson called it “part of a continuing propaganda campaign to vilify cats.”

Meanwhile, the Alley Cat Allies‘ propaganda campaign contributes to cat lovers‘ confusion. found most cat owners failed to perceive or acknowledge that cats harm wildlife, and 98 percent were unwilling to keep their cats on their property. Justifications included “but other wildlife is harmful to wildlife” and “my cat chooses for herself whether to stay in or go out.”

Similarly, a nationwide survey of TNR advocates found that 59 percent believe feral cats (23 percent were “unsure”) and 79 percent believe feral cats should be treated as protected wildlife.

Good sense trumps bad science

Alley Cat Allies claims that TNR “decreases the size of colonies over time,” that it is “successfully practiced in hundreds of colonies,” and is “grounded in science.” Like climate change deniers, TNR advocates ignore the preponderance of scientific evidence, but love to cite a few flawed studies and anecdotes that they believe prove their point. Three of the most commonly cited studies were conducted in Rome, Italy, and on college campuses in Florida and Texas.

is one of the worst I‘ve ever seen.  Relying on reports from undoubtedly biased cat owners, the researchers found more cats were neutered in 2000 (1,424) than supposedly existed (1,293). One year there were fewer reported cats (765) than registered cat colonies (965). Best of all, the authors concluded “all these efforts … are a waste of money, time and energy.”

The Texas researchers noted, “It cannot be stated definitively that the total number of cats on campus has decreased because the study was not designed to determine this.” The primary author of the Florida study admitted in a subsequent scientific article that reducing the cat population on campus would have required 94 percent of the cats to be neutered, a rate never achieved.

These are hardly glowing endorsements of TNR, yet they are cited repeatedly by advocates, most of whom, I suspect, haven‘t read the articles.

‘Monster of depravity‘

If TNR can eradicate feral cat populations the proof, as T.S. Eliot might have said, is in the pudding. But, for instance, the densities of rats in Baltimore alleys prowled by feral cats is “remarkably stable,” according to which compared rat and cat estimates from a half century earlier. The researchers found that cats did not rely on rats as their predominate food, but scavenged on many of the same food resources as the rats. In other words, the cats were eating garbage.

Chicago, which has some 650 managed feral cat colonies, was named “” by Orkin, the pest control company, in 2013 and 2014. In 2015, the city allowed a local TNR organization to release 3,500 more feral cats. Meanwhile, the estimated rat population climbed from 33,000 in 2014 to an anticipated 50,000 rats in 2016, leading Orkin to name Chicago .

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association and the Humane Society of the U.S. estimators, Chicago is home to 660,000 pet and at least 270,000 feral cats.  So the Windy City has 20 times as many cats as rats.

The real “monster of depravity” is this: every year that TNR caretakers are allowed to subsidize high densities of impractical cats by feeding them and loving them to pieces, billions more wild birds and small mammals are killed by these cats.

If Alley Cat Allies really is an “advocate for all animals” what about all those chipmunks and squirrels and birds?

Article source: https://kaplanherald.com/2017/12/29/alaska-has-far-too-many-impractical-cats/

Tags: , , , , ,

Watertown Daily Times | Pamelia woman accused of torturing animal

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 30, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

<!–

var articlecredit = [];
var articlecaption = [];
var articleimage = [];

–>

WATERTOWN — State police charged Elieen Lee-Cloot, 74, of Pamelia, with torturing, injuring or not feeding an animal on Friday.

Details were not available. Ms. Lee-Cloot, charged at 5:20 p.m. on Route 37, Pamelia, was later released with an appearance ticket for a local court.

Article source: http://www.watertowndailytimes.com/news03/pamelia-woman-accused-of-torturing-animal-20171226

Tags: , , , , ,

Alaska has far too many impractical cats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 29, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

In “Old Possum‘s Book of Practical Cats” – the poetic inspiration for the Tony Award-winning musical “Cats” – T. S. Eliot who is “always deceiving you into believing that he‘s only hunting for mice.”

Eliot‘s light verse portrays another cat as “a fiend in feline shape, a monster of depravity” who‘s called “the Hidden Paw.” These feline character studies were intended to be clever and humorous.

However, there really is a dark side to cats. Over the past 40 years the number of domestic cats in the United States has tripled. Cats are now believed to be the most abundant predator in the Lower 48 states, with an estimated 96 million in homes and credible estimates of feral and stray cats ranging from 30 million to 80 million.

[Related:]

This proliferation of pets has had unforeseen consequences for wild birds.

Truth is, there are practical cats and impractical cats. Practical cats are those who only kill pests like house mice, rats and the occasional wild voles or shrews that find their way inside our homes and other buildings.

Impractical cats are feral or free-ranging animals that kill billions of wild birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians every year. Our world is inhabited by far too many impractical cats.

It is illegal to release cats into the wild in Alaska. Nevertheless, the law is not well enforced, many abandoned and free-ranging cats are fed outdoors by people, and regular feeding stations can become cat colonies.

A “rescue group for animals with special needs” is asking state and local governments to legalize the proliferation of feral cat colonies in Alaska.

Mojo‘s Hope has submitted a proposal to the Alaska Board of Game to drop “sterilized feral cats” from the state‘s list of domestic animals that cannot be released into the wild without a permit. [Read here] The board begins a week-long meeting in Anchorage on Friday.

Allowing people to release cats and feed colonies of feral cats outdoors is a very bad idea.

‘A fiend in feline shape‘

Despite the purring assurances of Mr. Mistoffelees, cats kill a lot of wild animals.

Even when a cat merely bites or claws a bird, it often dies because bacteria on a cat‘s gums and teeth are lethal. Karen Munday, a specialist at a wildlife treatment center in Portland, Oregon, says “.”

Hundreds of scientific studies have documented local numbers of wild birds and mammals killed by cats. A meta-study conducted by Scott Loss, Tom Will and Peter Marra in 2013 combined the best of these studies into in the United States alone.

Merging the estimates of cat populations with a range of estimates for kill rates, the researchers concluded that cats kill 1.3 to 4 billion birds and 6.3 to 22.3 billion mammals annually. Billion. With a “b.”

‘The Hidden Paw‘

The Municipality of Anchorage, including 700-square-mile Chugach State Park, has far more cats than all wild predators combined.

According to Anchorage Animal Control, which uses the American Veterinary Medical Association calculation tool,  Anchorage has. That doesn‘t include feral cats.

By some estimates one-fourth to one-third of North America‘s domestic cats are allowed to roam freely and are considered to be feral or stray cats. The Humane Society of the United States and several scientific studies have estimated a community‘s feral cat population at , which suggests approximately 30,000 feral cats in Anchorage.

Thus, a conservative estimate for the combined total of domestic and feral cats in Anchorage is about 103,000 cats.

Multiplying that figure with the lowest estimates for mortality rates in the national meta-study yields an estimate of 1,148,000 birds and 5,975,000 mammals killed by cats in Anchorage each year.

If this estimate seems high to you, ponder this: with as many as 103,000 cats, the estimated kill averages about 11 birds per cat annually. Some pet cats kill no birds, but it takes no stretch of the imagination to realize that many cats, particularly feral cats, kill more than one bird a month. I suspect this estimate is low.

It‘s the sheer number of cats that is driving the high kill estimates. This unnatural drain on wild birds is a relatively recent phenomenon. There were no house cats in the western hemisphere before 1492.

And as long as those cats are roaming around outside, they are killing birds and other wildlife. Even well fed cats hunt.

Hoarders without borders

Most TNR advocates aren‘t scientists. They just love cats. And they repeat the feel-good nostrums concocted by the most vocal proponents like Becky Robinson, president of Alley Cat Allies.

Alley Cat Allies claims to be an “advocate for all animals,” but the organization has a laser-like focus on feral cats, while essentially ignoring their impacts on other animals and people. Not doctors without borders, but hoarders without borders.

Alley Cat Allies claims that “outdoor cats are part of our natural landscape” and “their home is the outdoors – just like squirrels, chipmunks, and birds.” If cats are “natural,” then dogs and rats are natural. Are we ready for feral dog colonies?

Feral rat colonies?

Hold on, feral rat colonies are already a thing.

I‘ve found seven instances in North America where a person was harboring anywhere from 200 to 2,000 uncaged rats in their home. Last year 600 pet rats were taken from an Ontario woman‘s one-bedroom apartment and – here‘s the best part – put up for adoption by local humane societies. As it happened, because many were pregnant when surrendered to authorities.

Does this sound crazy to you? It‘s no crazier than maintaining a feral cat colony. Perhaps cat people and rat people are two sides of the same coin. Interestingly, both insist that their favored pet won‘t harm the environment.

Robinson and Alley Cat Allies insist that free-roaming cats are not a threat to bird populations. They come to this conclusion only by ignoring or disagreeing with every bird expert who believes otherwise, and there are a lot of them, not “a small group” as Alley Cat Allies claims. A new study technique, affixing “kitty cams” to individual cats, is revealing even more kills than previously thought.

Attempting to obfuscate the issue, TNR advocates insist that most birds are killed by human-related causes, like pollution, towers, and windows. They seldom acknowledge that cats themselves are a human-related source of mortality. When the 2013 meta-study demonstrated that cats are a greater source of bird mortality than all other human causes combined, Robinson called it “part of a continuing propaganda campaign to vilify cats.”

Meanwhile, the Alley Cat Allies‘ propaganda campaign contributes to cat lovers‘ confusion. found most cat owners failed to perceive or acknowledge that cats harm wildlife, and 98 percent were unwilling to keep their cats on their property. Justifications included “but other wildlife is harmful to wildlife” and “my cat chooses for herself whether to stay in or go out.”

Similarly, a nationwide survey of TNR advocates found that 59 percent believe feral cats (23 percent were “unsure”) and 79 percent believe feral cats should be treated as protected wildlife.

Good sense trumps bad science

Alley Cat Allies claims that TNR “decreases the size of colonies over time,” that it is “successfully practiced in hundreds of colonies,” and is “grounded in science.” Like climate change deniers, TNR advocates ignore the preponderance of scientific evidence, but love to cite a few flawed studies and anecdotes that they believe prove their point. Three of the most commonly cited studies were conducted in Rome, Italy, and on college campuses in Florida and Texas.

is one of the worst I‘ve ever seen.  Relying on reports from undoubtedly biased cat owners, the researchers found more cats were neutered in 2000 (1,424) than supposedly existed (1,293). One year there were fewer reported cats (765) than registered cat colonies (965). Best of all, the authors concluded “all these efforts … are a waste of money, time and energy.”

The Texas researchers noted, “It cannot be stated definitively that the total number of cats on campus has decreased because the study was not designed to determine this.” The primary author of the Florida study admitted in a subsequent scientific article that reducing the cat population on campus would have required 94 percent of the cats to be neutered, a rate never achieved.

These are hardly glowing endorsements of TNR, yet they are cited repeatedly by advocates, most of whom, I suspect, haven‘t read the articles.

‘Monster of depravity‘

If TNR can eradicate feral cat populations the proof, as T.S. Eliot might have said, is in the pudding. But, for instance, the densities of rats in Baltimore alleys prowled by feral cats is “remarkably stable,” according to which compared rat and cat estimates from a half century earlier. The researchers found that cats did not rely on rats as their predominate food, but scavenged on many of the same food resources as the rats. In other words, the cats were eating garbage.

Chicago, which has some 650 managed feral cat colonies, was named “” by Orkin, the pest control company, in 2013 and 2014. In 2015, the city allowed a local TNR organization to release 3,500 more feral cats. Meanwhile, the estimated rat population climbed from 33,000 in 2014 to an anticipated 50,000 rats in 2016, leading Orkin to name Chicago .

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association and the Humane Society of the U.S. estimators, Chicago is home to 660,000 pet and at least 270,000 feral cats.  So the Windy City has 20 times as many cats as rats.

The real “monster of depravity” is this: every year that TNR caretakers are allowed to subsidize high densities of impractical cats by feeding them and loving them to pieces, billions more wild birds and small mammals are killed by these cats.

If Alley Cat Allies really is an “advocate for all animals” what about all those chipmunks and squirrels and birds?

Article source: https://kaplanherald.com/2017/12/29/alaska-has-far-too-many-impractical-cats/

Tags: , , , , ,

Investigation after 77 domesticated rats found abandoned in …

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 27, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

FORT COLLINS, Colo. – The Larimer County Humane Society has opened an investigation after they found more than 77 abandoned domestic rats in two open spaces Friday. According to CBS Denver, the humane society said all the rats were once pets, and were abandoned in cruel living conditions.

“We don’t come across dealing with rats on a daily basis,” said Jason Downs, Animal Protection Control Officer for the humane society.

Downs said the investigation began when two separate callers reported rats approaching them in friendly manners. One call came from the South Shields Open Space; the other came from the Riverbend Natural Area.

“There were approximately 30 rats that were running up to (our callers),” Downs said. “They came out at a large, fast rate, coming from the bushes. You would be amazed by how many rats were coming out.”

Downs said the rats were clearly not wild, and had once lived together in a household.

“You could tell, just the way they were reacting towards people. Running up to people, eating out of hands,” Downs said.

rats1.png

Rats believed to be pets were found abandoned in Fort Collins, Colo.

Downs said the rats were smart enough to stay together through a night in the snow in which temperatures dipped below 20 degrees. He said the rats used each other to survive by gathering in groups.

“Just imagine having 15 to 20 rats all in a big ball. They were all on top of each other,” Downs said.

“Putting them in the snow, without food or shelter, is abandonment. It’s cruelty,” said Bill Porter, director of Animal Control.

With the help of volunteers, the Humane Society worked to collect as many rats as they could.

“I crumbled up peanut butter cookies, laid them on the ground and they came running to us,” Downs said.

Volunteers reported seeing other rats walking in the area. However, attempts to rescue them fell short before nightfall Friday.

Porter said the person who abandoned the rats will face a charge of animal cruelty for each one recovered. At the time of this report, the suspect would face 77 charges. Each charge can come with a fine of $1,000, and time in jail.

The Humane Society planned to offer the rats for adoption. Each one would receive testing and treatment first.

“They seem like very sweet guys. You can’t beat that face,” Porter said. “We are going to do our best to find new homes for these guys.”

Aside from harm to the animals, the Humane Society said leaving these rats in the wild also could introduce new species to the area, attracting unwanted predators. They believed one rat did lose its life to a predator in the short time it was out.

Article source: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/investigation-launched-after-77-domesticated-rats-found-abandoned/

Tags: , , , , ,

Investigation after 77 domesticated rats found abandoned in Colorado

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 26, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

FORT COLLINS, Colo. – The Larimer County Humane Society has opened an investigation after they found more than 77 abandoned domestic rats in two open spaces Friday. According to CBS Denver, the humane society said all the rats were once pets, and were abandoned in cruel living conditions.

“We don’t come across dealing with rats on a daily basis,” said Jason Downs, Animal Protection Control Officer for the humane society.

Downs said the investigation began when two separate callers reported rats approaching them in friendly manners. One call came from the South Shields Open Space; the other came from the Riverbend Natural Area.

“There were approximately 30 rats that were running up to (our callers),” Downs said. “They came out at a large, fast rate, coming from the bushes. You would be amazed by how many rats were coming out.”

Downs said the rats were clearly not wild, and had once lived together in a household.

“You could tell, just the way they were reacting towards people. Running up to people, eating out of hands,” Downs said.

rats1.png

Rats believed to be pets were found abandoned in Fort Collins, Colo.

Downs said the rats were smart enough to stay together through a night in the snow in which temperatures dipped below 20 degrees. He said the rats used each other to survive by gathering in groups.

“Just imagine having 15 to 20 rats all in a big ball. They were all on top of each other,” Downs said.

“Putting them in the snow, without food or shelter, is abandonment. It’s cruelty,” said Bill Porter, director of Animal Control.

With the help of volunteers, the Humane Society worked to collect as many rats as they could.

“I crumbled up peanut butter cookies, laid them on the ground and they came running to us,” Downs said.

Volunteers reported seeing other rats walking in the area. However, attempts to rescue them fell short before nightfall Friday.

Porter said the person who abandoned the rats will face a charge of animal cruelty for each one recovered. At the time of this report, the suspect would face 77 charges. Each charge can come with a fine of $1,000, and time in jail.

The Humane Society planned to offer the rats for adoption. Each one would receive testing and treatment first.

“They seem like very sweet guys. You can’t beat that face,” Porter said. “We are going to do our best to find new homes for these guys.”

Aside from harm to the animals, the Humane Society said leaving these rats in the wild also could introduce new species to the area, attracting unwanted predators. They believed one rat did lose its life to a predator in the short time it was out.

Article source: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/investigation-launched-after-77-domesticated-rats-found-abandoned/

Tags: , , , , ,

Fort Collins rodent rescue: More than 80 tame rats left out in the cold …

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 25, 2017 in Rat News
Closed
Two of about 80 pet rats rescued from Fort Collins natural areas Thursday and Friday climb the bars of their cage Friday. Though some of the rats spent a night outdoors in frigid weather, the majority seem healthy and energetic.
Two of about 80 pet rats rescued from Fort Collins natural areas Thursday and Friday climb the bars of their cage Friday. Though some of the rats spent a night outdoors in frigid weather, the majority seem healthy and energetic.

LOVELAND — The Larimer Humane Society in Loveland became the beneficiary of more than 80 domesticated rats Friday after animal control officers rescued the rodents from two Fort Collins natural areas.

A concerned citizen called the Larimer Humane Society on Thursday evening to report about 30 apparently tame rats at the North Shields Ponds Natural Area in Fort Collins, officials said.

Humane Society officers rescued some of the rats Thursday, and then another call came in Friday morning that echoed the concerns of the first: The caller had found dozens of friendly rats at Riverbend Ponds Natural Area, about six miles away from the first location.

The rats ran up to passersby and begged for food, even climbing up a person’s leg, said Jason Downs, one of the animal protection and control officers who responded to the calls.

“They were cold, and they wanted to eat,” Downs said.

Downs said he used some peanut butter cookies his children had made for him to lure the rats out of the bushes. It took officers about an hour to round up the rats with nets and by grabbing them by the tails (“politely,” Downs said).

Read the full story at ReporterHerald.com.

Article source: https://www.denverpost.com/2017/12/23/fort-collins-rat-rescue/

Tags: , , , , ,

Copyright © 2018 RatChatter All rights reserved.
RatChatter v1.0 theme from BuyNowShop.com.