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Infection with Rare Virus Traced to Teen’s Pet Rats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 16, 2017 in Rat News
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A mother and her daughter in Tennessee were infected with a virus rarely seen in the United States, and the culprit seems to be pet rats.

The two women tested positive for the Seoul virus, according to a new report, published today (Oct. 12) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Seoul virus is part of the Hantavirus family, a group of viruses that typically infect rodents.

The CDC reported in January that there was an outbreak of the virus among rat breeders and owners in Illinois and Wisconsin; that same month, the Tennessee Department of Health was notified of an individual with pet rats from one of the Illinois breeders with infected rats, according to the new report. [10 Deadly Diseases That Hopped Across Species]

In fact, the owner of the pet rats, an 18-year-old, had gotten sick in December 2016 with an “unspecified viral illness,” the researchers said. She recovered fully from the virus without treatment. A test on a preserved sample of her blood that had been drawn when she was sick revealed that she had been infected with the Seoul virus.  

The teenager didn’t let health officials test her pet rats for the virus, but the officials presumed that the rodents also had the virus. As such, the officials recommended that the rats be euthanized. Once again, the teen refused. In response, the Tennessee Department of Health prohibited the teen from removing the rats from her home, essentially quarantining the pets. In addition, they educated the teen and her family about the best ways to avoid infection, which include avoiding contact with rodent urine, droppings, saliva and nesting material, according to the report.

But in April, the teen’s 38-year-old mother got sick, too. She went to the emergency room with symptoms including a very high fever of 104.5 degrees Fahrenheit (40.3 degrees Celsius), shortness of breath, fatigue and lack of appetite, the report said. A blood test revealed that she had the Seoul virus. The mother told doctors that she had cleaned up rodent droppings from a bathtub about three weeks before she got sick.

The Seoul virus

The Seoul virus infects brown Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus), which are found worldwide, according to the report. The virus can spread easily between rats, and can also be passed from rats to humans, according to the CDC. As of January, 17 confirmed cases of the Seoul virus in people in the U.S. have been linked to rats from breeders in Illinois, the report said.

However, the virus cannot spread from human to human, according to the CDC.

Severe infections with the Seoul virus can cause a disease called hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, which includes symptoms such as internal bleeding and kidney problems, the CDC says. Most people who are infected with the Seoul virus, however, experience mild or even no symptoms, and the death rate for the disease is approximately 1 or 2 percent, the CDC says.

Indeed, the Seoul virus is less severe than another form of the hantavirus, called the Sin Nombre virus, according to the CDC. The Sin Nombre virus is spread by the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and it causes a condition called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. These infections can cause severe breathing difficulties that require hospitalization, and the death rate for the disease is about 38 percent, the CDC says.

Originally published on Live Science.

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Article source: https://www.yahoo.com/news/infection-rare-virus-traced-teen-123900212.html

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Rat Film

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 14, 2017 in Rat News
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Director Theo Anthony draws parallels: between statistics and hunches, between logistics and subtext, between the systemic and the everyday, between the drama of history and the total lack of histrionics required to support his 100-year-old post-apocalyptic vision of institutionalized racism. This vision is Rat Film, Anthony’s brilliant docu-essay chronicling Baltimore’s city planning and resultant systemic segregation as a microcosm of the still-failing American Urban Experiment.

In it, first we hear a voice (Maureen Jones, siri-adjacent). Amidst stark black, before we see anything we hear: “Before the world became the world it was an Egg. Inside the Egg was Dark. The rat nibbled the egg and let the Light in. And the world began.” From these first moments, Rat Film introduces the idea of creation—from whatever mythos Anthony culled this intro—not as an expansion, a pushing out, but as an illusion of growth hiding something so much more claustrophobic, so much more suffocating. Rat Film is ostensibly about Baltimore’s rat problem, about how the City has historically dealt with and studied and used parts of their poorest neighborhoods to address pest control, trial-and-erroring over decades, but as Edmund the amicable exterminator with the Baltimore City Rat Rubout Program tells us, “There ain’t never been a rat problem in Baltimore; there’s always been a people problem.”

This is the parallel Anthony most wants to explore, how systems of power treat minority and impoverished communities as lab rats, expendable and experimental. The path he treads wanders wildly—his film a weaving, loosely tracked tone poem, its free form in direct opposition to the boundaries and strictures imposed on the aforementioned communities, human and rodent alike—but his themes are always clear, and the points he makes always buttressed by simple, unadorned facts. When he couples a near-nauseous digital video of a rat attempting to escape a trash can in a back alley with voice-over monotoning, “The adult Norway rat can jump 32 inches high. Baltimore city trash cans are 34 inches high,” we understand, precisely, Anthony’s logic. Baltimore is a city built to sequester, and in turn neuter, those populations with which it’d rather not deal.

In 1911, we’re told, the City of Baltimore passed a law which essentially divided neighborhoods along racial lines, passing “the nation’s first legislation of its kind.” Six years later, the Supreme Court outlawed such legislation, which only drove the sources behind such segregation further into the private sector‚—where that power always wanted to be anyway. Anthony then details how Baltimore institution Johns Hopkins University utilized such preternatural, physical class distinctions as ready-made laboratories to study rodent populations, especially in the context of rat control. Anthony’s historic documents—photographs, maps, letters, news articles—he wields with Ken Burns-like precision, demonstrating both in-depth research and a journalist’s eye for sussing out the larger ideas behind the cold facts. All of it culminates in a heartbreaking tale of how a Baltimore denizen’s barn was converted into a warehouse space wherein Johns Hopkins scientists built a cloistered rat colony, observing how isolation manifested in a rat community. The results are, of course, devastating—the rats stratified themselves, setting up ersatz social classes and generally massacring the weak, including rat babies—mostly because of how Anthony’s seeded the injustice of anti-miscegenation into his film so that, by the time poindexters in thick-rimmed glasses are smugly grinning, posing next to their sad rat prison, the audience knows exactly what Anthony’s implying.

Alongside his historic through line, Anthony presents vignettes and mini-profiles of Baltimore residents. There’s Edmund, whom we follow on assorted house calls, but there’s also a couple who have a meticulously crafted rat room in their house where their pet rats can roam free, a pair of rat hunters who sit outside of alleyways literally fishing for rats to pulverize with a baseball bat, a standard middle class Millennial who displays his arsenal of rat-murdering weapons, and musician Dan Deacon, who not only provides the film’s (wonderful and, if you’ve ever heard Deacon’s music, unexpectedly unhurried) score, but who we watch composing that score, using rat brain scans in consort with censors converting the movement of rats trapped in transparent plexiglass displays to sound. In these moments with Deacon, we are present for one of the film’s most lasting images: rats, confined, piling into a corner with nowhere to go, escaping apparently nothing but attempting to escape nonetheless.

These many threads and faces and stories wind around one another as Rat Film moves toward a final point—its final point being the same point upon which it started, so anticlimactic and graceful that it hardly bears repeating, only watching, over and over and over. Anthony’s is the rare film that thrives in its parts rather than in the sum of them, though the sum is breathlessly simple, to the extent that one wonders why no film has ever connected the lines—lined up the parallels—as Anthony has. Because that sum is a feeling limned in symbology, a feeling of strangulation, of universes crammed into ill-fitting spaces, taming and domesticating the Other through literally squeezing the life out of them.

Near the end of the film, Anthony returns to a 3-D map of Baltimore he introduced at the beginning of the film, implying how a whole city can be represented in, say, Google Earth, but that once a user attempts to see into the pixelated apartment buildings and crumbling neighborhoods, the program defaults, replacing unknowns with visions of the cosmos. He pushes the camera, the POV, through the walls of a digital building; the floorboards are missing, and in their places is the blackness of space, punctuated by constellations of stars, as if, with nothing in the way, Google Earth has no choice but to stare into the abyss of Space. The image is mundane, but in Anthony’s hands it’s arresting, speaking for the millions of lives displaced by a century of American “progress.” The abandoned house is the Egg, and Anthony’s camera is the rat, nibbling at the edifice, just trying, however futile, to let the light in.

Director: Theo Anthony
Writer: Theo Anthony
Release Date: October 13, 2017


Dom Sinacola is Associate Movies Editor at Paste and a Portland-based writer. You can follow him on Twitter.

Article source: https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2017/10/rat-film.html

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Rare virus traced to teen’s pet rats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 13, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

Severe infections with the Seoul virus can cause a disease called hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, which includes symptoms such as internal bleeding and kidney problems.

 (iStock)

A mother and her daughter in Tennessee were infected with a virus rarely seen in the United States, and the culprit seems to be pet rats.

The two women tested positive for the Seoul virus, according to a new report, published today (Oct. 12) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Seoul virus is part of the Hantavirus family, a group of viruses that typically infect rodents.

The CDC reported in January that there was an outbreak of the virus among rat breeders and owners in Illinois and Wisconsin; that same month, the Tennessee Department of Health was notified of an individual with pet rats from one of the Illinois breeders with infected rats, according to the new report. 

In fact, the owner of the pet rats, an 18-year-old, had gotten sick in December 2016 with an “unspecified viral illness,” the researchers said. She recovered fully from the virus without treatment. A test on a preserved sample of her blood that had been drawn when she was sick revealed that she had been infected with the Seoul virus.  

The teenager didn’t let health officials test her pet rats for the virus, but the officials presumed that the rodents also had the virus. As such, the officials recommended that the rats be euthanized. Once again, the teen refused. In response, the Tennessee Department of Health prohibited the teen from removing the rats from her home, essentially quarantining the pets. In addition, they educated the teen and her family about the best ways to avoid infection, which include avoiding contact with rodent urine, droppings, saliva and nesting material, according to the report.

But in April, the teen’s 38-year-old mother got sick, too. She went to the emergency room with symptoms including a very high fever of 104.5 degrees Fahrenheit (40.3 degrees Celsius), shortness of breath, fatigue and lack of appetite, the report said. A blood test revealed that she had the Seoul virus. The mother told doctors that she had cleaned up rodent droppings from a bathtub about three weeks before she got sick.

The Seoul virus

The Seoul virus infects brown Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus), which are found worldwide, according to the report. The virus can spread easily between rats, and can also be passed from rats to humans, according to the CDC. As of January, 17 confirmed cases of the Seoul virus in people in the U.S. have been linked to rats from breeders in Illinois, the report said.

However, the virus cannot spread from human to human, according to the CDC.

More on this…

Severe infections with the Seoul virus can cause a disease called hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, which includes symptoms such as internal bleeding and kidney problems, the CDC says. Most people who are infected with the Seoul virus, however, experience mild or even no symptoms, and the death rate for the disease is approximately 1 or 2 percent, the CDC says.

Indeed, the Seoul virus is less severe than another form of the hantavirus, called the Sin Nombre virus, according to the CDC. The Sin Nombre virus is spread by the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and it causes a condition called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. These infections can cause severe breathing difficulties that require hospitalization, and the death rate for the disease is about 38 percent, the CDC says.

Originally published on Live Science.

Article source: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/10/13/rare-virus-traced-to-teens-pet-rats.html

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Infection with Rare Virus Traced to Teen’s Pet Rats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 12, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

A mother and her daughter in Tennessee were infected with a virus rarely seen in the United States, and the culprit seems to be pet rats.

The two women tested positive for the Seoul virus, according to a new report, published today (Oct. 12) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Seoul virus is part of the Hantavirus family, a group of viruses that typically infect rodents.

The CDC reported in January that there was an outbreak of the virus among rat breeders and owners in Illinois and Wisconsin; that same month, the Tennessee Department of Health was notified of an individual with pet rats from one of the Illinois breeders with infected rats, according to the new report. [10 Deadly Diseases That Hopped Across Species]

In fact, the owner of the pet rats, an 18-year-old, had gotten sick in December 2016 with an “unspecified viral illness,” the researchers said. She recovered fully from the virus without treatment. A test on a preserved sample of her blood that had been drawn when she was sick revealed that she had been infected with the Seoul virus.  

The teenager didn’t let health officials test her pet rats for the virus, but the officials presumed that the rodents also had the virus. As such, the officials recommended that the rats be euthanized. Once again, the teen refused. In response, the Tennessee Department of Health prohibited the teen from removing the rats from her home, essentially quarantining the pets. In addition, they educated the teen and her family about the best ways to avoid infection, which include avoiding contact with rodent urine, droppings, saliva and nesting material, according to the report.

But in April, the teen’s 38-year-old mother got sick, too. She went to the emergency room with symptoms including a very high fever of 104.5 degrees Fahrenheit (40.3 degrees Celsius), shortness of breath, fatigue and lack of appetite, the report said. A blood test revealed that she had the Seoul virus. The mother told doctors that she had cleaned up rodent droppings from a bathtub about three weeks before she got sick.

The Seoul virus infects brown Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus), which are found worldwide, according to the report. The virus can spread easily between rats, and can also be passed from rats to humans, according to the CDC. As of January, 17 confirmed cases of the Seoul virus in people in the U.S. have been linked to rats from breeders in Illinois, the report said.

However, the virus cannot spread from human to human, according to the CDC.

Severe infections with the Seoul virus can cause a disease called hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, which includes symptoms such as internal bleeding and kidney problems, the CDC says. Most people who are infected with the Seoul virus, however, experience mild or even no symptoms, and the death rate for the disease is approximately 1 or 2 percent, the CDC says.

Indeed, the Seoul virus is less severe than another form of the hantavirus, called the Sin Nombre virus, according to the CDC. The Sin Nombre virus is spread by the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and it causes a condition called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. These infections can cause severe breathing difficulties that require hospitalization, and the death rate for the disease is about 38 percent, the CDC says.

Originally published on Live Science.

Article source: https://www.livescience.com/60668-pet-rat-seoul-virus-outbreak.html

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It’s Not You, It’s Your House: Home Buyer Turnoffs

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 10, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

real estate agents

Are you getting ready to sell your house? If so, you’ll want to make sure you put your best foot forward. You’re selling something you’ve lived in and take a lot of pride in, so naturally you’ll want to show it off to every potential buyer that walks through the door.

It’s a seller’s market right now, and according to the latest existing home sales numbers, there are roughly 4.2 months’ worth of supply left in the market if sales hold at their current levels. For perspective, the market is considered in balance between buyers and sellers when there is about six months’ worth of supply, so the scales are definitely tipped in favor of the seller at this point.

Properties are also staying on the market for an average of about 30 days. If your property has been for sale for a couple of months, it’s time to figure out what’s causing buyers to avoid your property.

We reached out to real estate agents to have them discuss the biggest home buyer turnoffs they’ve encountered. You don’t want people put off before the tour even starts by an absolute showstopper.

The Price is Wrong

It may be a seller’s market right now, but that doesn’t mean you can price your home any way you want.

Artur Muller, a mortgage broker and CEO of south Florida-based AMLUXE Realty, said price is the most critical factor – pricing your home well above market value is not a great idea.

“It is very important that you do not overprice the home as it will scare buyers away and your home will sit on the market for a while, creating a red flag along the way,” he said. “At the same time, the asking price should always be slightly above market value as it will create some wiggle room for negotiations.”

Muller said buyers are usually well-versed enough in the market to see a good value. If you’re in the situation when you need a quick sale, pricing just below market value can help.

Sent Away by Scent

One common theme the experts we spoke with kept coming back to was that sellers should avoid foul orders. Your home doesn’t have to smell like fresh-baked cookies (although it would help), but you don’t want to offend either.

Anne Newsome is a realtor in Columbia, South Carolina with Rinehart Realty. She said that in some cases, an odor can really stink up a potential sale.

“I had a buyer who was completely turned off by an offensive odor that was in the master bathroom … and it was cigarette smoke!” she said. “We looked at three houses and she was leaning more towards that home for other reasons but because of the odor in this one room of the home, one of the other homes became her #1 choice for making an offer.”

Something like cigarette smoke can be tricky and you may want to call on professionals to do their magic and remove the scent. However, in most cases when the smell will leave with the owner, you can do some simple things to mitigate and eliminate orders.

“Use some plug-ins and open the windows occasionally to be sure there are no odors”, said Tyler Ohta, a realtor with Berkshire Hathaway Home Services, based in Reston, Virginia.

Ohta said that having fresh flowers on hand for showings can really bump things up to the next level in terms of presentation.

Pet Trouble

Pets can be awesome sources of unconditional love. All a dog asks for in return for years of cuddles and listening to your problems without ever passing judgment is the occasional slice of bacon.

However, if you have pets that are a little more exotic, it can lead to some interesting situations, as Mariko Baerg, a realtor that covers the Vancouver area for the Bridgewell Group, explained.

“The biggest turnoff I have encountered recently was when my buyers walked in to a unit that had rats running around it and fecal matter everywhere,” Baerg said. “When we asked the sellers about a possible infestation issue, they said that those are their pet rats and they let them run around the unit as they please!”

While we aren’t all necessarily raising our own family of Stuart Littles, it is important to clean up after your pet and ensure your house is presentable by cleaning floors and carpets and using air fresheners to mitigate pet odor and other issues – generally making sure that potential buyers don’t notice the pet before they see the house.

House Presentation

Presentation is everything, and there are two facets to this: preparing your home for sale and also staging your home for potential buyers walking through. Let’s cover both briefly.

Getting Ready to Sell

Muller said that if your house hasn’t been updated in a while, you should set aside a reasonable budget to perform upgrades, even though your instinct may be to discount the price of the house rather than spending the money to update.

This line of thinking is good in theory, but it’s often easier to get the money for a mortgage than it is to get the money then to come up with another large sum for renovations. With that in mind, interested buyers may choose to pay a little more for a house that’s already redone as opposed to one that needs work after their purchase. Three areas of the most concern are flooring, kitchen and bathroom areas. On the outside, Muller pointed to air-conditioning and roofing updates as things that buyers worry will cost them a lot of money later on if they’re not fixed before the sale.

That said, not everything you do has to cost a great deal of money. Once you’ve established a budget, things like updating door handles and putting on a fresh coat of paint can make a big difference.

Staging the House

Shakespeare said “all the world’s a stage.” When it comes to selling your house, it’s somewhat like putting on a performance; you want your house to look best when all eyes are upon it.

Ohta said that an important thing to remember is that your buyers have to be able to envision themselves living in a space. To that end, she recommends the following tip:

“When you’re showing a home, you really want to depersonalize the space and remove as much clutter as you can,” she said. “It makes it hard for the buyer to see the home through clutter to envision themselves living there. Now that everyone watches HGTV there is an expectation that the home will be nicely staged and not cluttered.”

It’s important that there be plenty of walk-through space as well. You don’t want it to be overcrowded with furniture, which makes it appear less spacious.

Not everyone is going to be an expert at staging their home. If you’re stuck, a real estate agent who knows their craft can help provide tips or even connect you with someone who stages homes professionally. If you haven’t yet found a real estate agent, our friends at In-House Realty can help connect you with an excellent one in your area.

With these tips, we hope that your home sells quickly. Do you have any questions? Let us know in the comments.

Article source: https://www.quickenloans.com/blog/not-house-home-buyer-turnoffs

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Oakhurst Center was a shelter in the storm

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 9, 2017 in Rat News
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Local nursing and rehab facility took in Naples patients; staff stayed on site

Katheryn Baggett never noticed when the Oakhurst Center nursing and rehabilitation facility in Ocala lost power during Hurricane Irma.

By the time she woke in her room Monday morning, staff already had turned on additional floor fans. The center’s two industrial generators kicked in just seconds after electrical service from the city stopped.

Baggett of course did notice the 56 new residents from her nursing facility’s sister facility in Naples. They had arrived Thursday, before the Sunday/Monday hurricane. She also noticed the nine children belonging to staff who came before the storm and stayed in the occupational therapy kitchen, and the dogs and cats and pet rats and a bird, which also belonged to staff and were brought for shelter.

Baggett, 73, who is from Winter Haven, also appreciated the dozens of Oakhurst Center staffers who weren’t scheduled to work during the storm but came in, anyway, to ensure their residents were safe.

There is concern whether nursing facilities in Florida can withstand hurricanes and the loss of electric service. The deaths of at least 14 residents at The Rehabilitation Center in Hollywood Hills, due to heat, has become a tragic national story. Oakhurst Center in Ocala was a success story. The 160-resident facility took in the additional patients when its parent company, Genesis Healthcare, wanted to evacuate its Naples residents.

The 56 temporary residents stayed a week. Baggett didn’t mind.

“I noticed there were a lot of new people. They told us they were having people from down south,” she said. “But that’s what we’re supposed to do: help people who can’t help themselves.”

She heard the laughter of children not far from her room. She liked that they stayed the day. She moved into Oakhurst Center in August, when a wound following surgery became infected. Oakhurst treated the infection, and she will go back home in a few days.

Oakhurst Center has nearly 200 employees, the vast majority of them nurses, therapists and certified nursing assistants. The facility offers long- and short-term rehabilitation for temporary residents and nursing care to those who live there permanently.

Nearly a week before the storm, which left thousands homeless and millions without power throughout Florida, David Hunt, Oakhurst Center’s executive director, and his staff began preparing.

Hunt made the facility available to his staff and their families and pets the night of the storm.

That served two purposes.

“We wanted to make sure we were not only taking care of our patients, but also staff and their families,” Hunt said, adding later: “And it was understood we had an obligation to our patients.”

The accommodations were tight, but at least staff and patients felt they had each other and they were in it together, said Annette Lotz, Oakhurst Center’s nurse executive.

Nine children stayed in the center’s occupational therapy kitchen. The center provided movies, hot dogs, chips and frozen, flavored pops, Lotz said. The children ranged from 2 years old to teenagers.

Generators kept all of the center’s emergency equipment running, as well as ceiling fans and other amenities.

Staff slept on mattresses and sleeping bags; strategically placed floor fans helped circulate air. Two portable air conditioning units were available but never needed. Staff also arranged IV poles and strung sheets between them to create makeshift rooms for the Naples’ guests, who slept in the main dayroom.

Although Oakhurst Center lost power for 23 hours, the temperature throughout the rooms never passed 84 degrees.

The staff put pets in a room that was going to have the carpet changed, anyway, Hunt said with a laugh.

More than 100 staff stayed at the facility, many volunteering to do so to make sure their residents were taken care of. They slept where they could, using day rooms and rehab gyms as dormitories for the night.

They put trash barrels throughout the building just in case the roof leaked, because staff didn’t want the floors to get wet and endanger the residents. The barrels were never needed at facility, 1501 SE 24th Road.

Hunt plans to buy more portable air conditioners and is looking at hooking up the facility’s main central air conditioners into the generators.

Patients’ safety and comfort came first, Lotz said. And while temperatures in the low 80s might seem a little warm for some people, Lotz said the elderly, typically with thinner skin, tolerate warm a little better than younger people.

As for the deaths in Hollywood Hills, Hunt didn’t know the specifics but said, “I think there’s a level of accountability that we take for the people we care for. We know we have to take care of them.”

Federal regulations require plans for emergencies, but in many cases at other facilities it’s a plan only on paper, he said, adding “You have to make sure it’s a reality.”

It’s also important a facility has agreements with other nursing care homes to take in patients in case of emergencies. To that end, Hunt said he has agreements with twice the number just in case a natural disaster affects a large area of the state and some doors are closed to him.

While it’s a difficult decision to evacuate elderly and often frail patients, Hunt said, “you can’t wait until the last minute, personally or professionally.”

But finally, Hunt said he and his staff had one most important focus during and after the storm, “to take care of our people.”

Reach Fred Hiers at fred.hiers@starbanner.com and 352-397-5914.

 

Article source: http://www.ocala.com/news/20171009/oakhurst-center-was-shelter-in-storm

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Thug who tortured and killed hamsters jailed for 14 months

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 8, 2017 in Rat News
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A SADIST who killed pet hamsters as a way of tormenting his girlfriend has been jailed for 14 months.

Lewis Fox hurled one animal, named Beano, at a wall, strangled one with a telephone cable, squeezed another to death and set fire to a fourth because it bit him.

Trevor Wright, prosecuting, told Maidstone crown court: ‘He said he burnt its toes off with a lighter.’

Fox also killed two pet rats and took photos to send to his then girlfriend.

Last November, the teenager woke to find Fox with his hands around her throat after he discovered she had been texting another man. She begged him to stop but he continued to throttle her for ten minutes.

The court heard the couple had started a relationship in late 2014 but within the first month Fox was texting other girls.

He controlled his girlfriend by telling her what to wear and criticising her for using too much make-up.

He monitored her social media accounts, spat in her face on numerous occasions and burnt her with a cigarette.

Mr Wright said: ‘They talked about trying for a baby. She said she wanted to see if he was capable of caring for something.

‘She bought a baby hamster to see if he could look after it. Within a week he killed that hamster because he reckoned that little animal preferred her to him.’

Fox, 22, of Sittingbourne, Kent, admitted causing unnecessary suffering to a protected animal and engaging in controlling or coercive behaviour.

As well as the jail term, a restraining order banning contact with his ex-girlfriend was placed on Fox, whose new girlfriend is pregnant with his child.

A psychiatric report found that Fox, who suffers from ADHD, had a personality disorder, and a callous dis-regard for others.

Sentencing Fox, Judge Julian Smith said: ‘You struggle on occasions to see what it is you have done wrong.

‘I have continuing concerns about your future behaviour towards partners and animals.’

Article source: https://www.metro.news/thug-who-tortured-and-killed-hamsters-jailed-for-14-months/771131/

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More than 100 neglected animals seized from Buckeye home

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 7, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

– Maricopa County Sheriff’s officials say they’ve seized more than 100 neglected animals from a home near 193rd Avenue and McDowell Road.

They say an animal crimes unit served a search warrant on the property Monday and found more than 30 dogs that were in a bedroom, plus numerous cats that appeared to be ill from a lack of food and water.

VIDEO: MCSO news briefing on the large scale animal seizure

The homeowner’s 18-year-old daughter and 11-year-old son were found at the site. MCSO says they immediately contacted the Arizona Department of Child Safety, which has an open case involving the boy.

“This is the third case of neglect we’ve investigated in 19 days. Both children and animals needed our assistance and we acted swiftly to help,” stated Sheriff Paul Penzone.

Sheriff’s investigators believe there was both hoarding and breeding of animals at the home. They say 37 dogs were seized, along with 21 cats, 16 pigs, 16 guinea pigs, seven goats, six donkeys, six mini-horses, four pet rats, three horses, two rabbits, two birds, one tortoise and one mule.

Officials say ownership of all animals was signed over to MCSO. The animals remain in emergency veterinary care.

The investigation is ongoing and no arrests have been made.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Article source: http://www.fox10phoenix.com/news/arizona-news/more-than-100-neglected-animals-seized-from-buckeye-home

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A One-Night Stay in ‘Alcatraz’ on Halloween Is Going for the Perfect Price

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 6, 2017 in Rat News
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Article source: http://time.com/money/4972416/halloween-night-alcatraz-666/

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Thug killed animals by throwing them against a wall and burning their feet

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 5, 2017 in Rat News
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Thug killed animals by throwing them against a wall and burning their feet
Lewis Fox abused animals to control his girlfriend (Picture: Jim Bennett)

A sadistic thug who tortured and killed pet hamsters as a way of tormenting his girlfriend.

Lewis Fox, 18, hurled rodent Beano at a wall and killed two pet rats.

The teen strangled one of the rodents with a telephone cable, squeezed one to death and set fire to another because it bit him.

Wealthy couple sue pensioner in row over Japanese knotweed

He even took photos of the dead pets to send to his then girlfriend in a revolting act of torment.

Trevor Wight, prosecuting, said: ‘He said he burnt its toes off with a lighter.

‘Perhaps most disgustingly of all, she described how he would pick his nose and then the bloody contents of his fingers would be wiped in her hair.’

Fox, from Sittingbourne, Kent, admitted causing unnecessary suffering to a protected animal and engaging in controlling or coercive behaviour.

Maidstone Crown Court in Kent (Picture: PA)

Maidstone Crown Court heard the couple started a relationship in late 2014 but within the first month Fox was texting other girls.

He started controlling her and telling her what to wear, criticised her make-up and told her to dye her hair, but when she did so he said he did not like it.

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He tracked her social media accounts, flirted with her friends, was paranoid to be seen with her and spat in her face on numerous occasions.

Fox also told her how he wanted to ‘strangle and hurt you’ on her 18th birthday in July 2015 and gave her a cake before throwing it on the floor and kicking her out.

In November last year the victim was lying next to Fox in bed when she awoke to find him with his hands around her throat after discovering she had been texting another man.

She feared she could die and begged him to stop and he told her it would be easy to snap her neck and continued to throttle her for ten minutes.

Her father gave her £4,000 as an 18th birthday present and Fox borrowed £1,580 from her and did not pay it back.

A psychiatric report found that Fox, who suffers from ADHD, had a personality disorder, and a callous disregard for others.

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After killing the pets, the former scaffolder inflicted bruises on her wrists and body from being held down and on another occasion poured a bottle of water over her and burnt her with a cigarette.

 

Fox was jailed for 14 months – 10 months for controlling behaviour and four months consecutive for animal cruelty – and banned indefinitely from keeping any animals.

A restraining order banning contact with his ex-girlfriend was placed on Fox, whose new girlfriend is pregnant with his child.

Article source: http://metro.co.uk/2017/10/05/thug-killed-animals-by-throwing-them-against-a-wall-and-burning-their-feet-6979652/

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