Page 2 of the pet rat archive.

Cause of College Park Apartment fire under investigation (VIDEO …

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 26, 2017 in Rat News
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Firefighters work on a blaze Oct. 24, 2017.

BRUCE BISHOP / CHRONICLE

Article source: http://www.chroniclet.com/cops-and-courts/2017/10/24/Live-Firefighters-battling-fire-at-College-Park-Apartments.html

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Rat Film Looks at Rats, Redlining, and Racial Segregation

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 25, 2017 in Rat News
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ratfilm.jpeg

This odd, amazing, nearly uncategorizable documentary does a lot of things in a short span of time. Though it initially appears to be about rats—how high they can jump, how they infest poor neighborhoods, why studying them is useful for scientists—it turns out to be about other things, too.

For example, the redlining of Baltimore. Also, the results of experiments about confining living beings into small areas for long periods of time. Plus there’s footage of snakes in terrariums eating baby rats (which look like wrinkly flesh nuggets) and people who have pet rats and let them sit on their heads while they watch TV.

Rat Film plays October 25-29 at Northwest Film Forum. Director Theo Anthony will be in attendance on October 25 and 26. He will give a lecture about the production of Rat Film and his creative process on October 26 at 6:30 p.m.

Article source: http://www.thestranger.com/slog/2017/10/24/25490487/rat-film-looks-at-rats-redlining-and-racial-segregation

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Strictly Halloween – Gemma, Davood and Debbie look spook-tacular!

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 24, 2017 in Rat News
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There’s a full moon over Elstree Studios, and TV Times is creeping through the cobwebbed corridors, carrying a ghoulishly glam pumpkin for our exclusive Strictly Halloween photo shoot.

“Wolf of Walford” Davood Ghadami, and his devilish accomplices Debbie McGee and Gemma Atkinson soon get into the spirit of things as they pose for our boo-tiful snaps!

Here,  Debbie McGee, Davood Ghadami and Gemma Atkinson talk Strictly Halloween…

TV Times: Are you excited for the landmark Strictly Halloween special?

Davood Ghadami: “Yes! It’s Halloween on steroids, and it’s what I’ve been aiming for all series. Part of you becomes an actor to get gritty roles and work with great people, but there’s another side of you that just wants to dress up!”

Debbie McGee: “I always love watching the Halloween special because it’s so different.”

Gemma Atkinson: “Movie week was so fantastic and everyone said, ‘You think this is good? Wait ‘til Halloween!’ So I can’t wait to see what they’ve got up their sleeves for us. I love anything spooky.”

Strictly Emma Atkinson

Bewitching: Gemma’s hoping for a terrifying 10 in Strictly Halloween!

TVT: Do you celebrate Halloween at home?

Debbie: “Well I do because my birthday is on Halloween – I am a real witch! I’ve had lots of Halloween parties and it’s always been a big deal for our family. I used to do a lot of live broadcasts and magic shows on the night with my late husband, Paul [Daniels] too. He threw a huge surprise party for me once, a friend of mine dressed our house up with cobwebs, twinkly lights and pumpkins – the place was completely transformed.”

Davood: “I love it! As kids we always got dressed up and tried to scare each other and now we drive my two little girls round to family’s houses for trick or treating. They mainly love the idea of getting sweets!”

Gemma: “I used to join in when I was a kid, but now I’m one of those people who pretends they’re out so I don’t get trick or treaters!”

TVT: What scares you (apart from Craig!)?

Debbie: “I don’t like rats because I had a friend who was bitten in bed by one once when she was staying on a farm. I’m not too bad with spiders but I don’t like furry ones – I’m a bit of a scaredy cat when it comes to tarantulas.”

Gemma: “I was that weird kid that used to have pet rats but the one thing I’m frightened of is snakes. I’d never harm one but if someone asked me to hold one I’d have to say no.”

Davood: “I don’t like ghosts, rollercoasters, horror films – that makes me sound boring, but I’m a control freak! I can’t stand slugs either.”

Davood Strictly

Happy howling: Davood’s all out to impress the judges in Strictly Halloween

TVT: Are your families excited to see you doing so well in Strictly?

Gemma: “My mum is a huge fan of the show and my 13-year old niece loves it. Whenever the team do my hair and make up she always asks me to send her a picture.”

Davood: “There was a confession last week at my house – my wife told me my daughters are obsessed with Jonnie Peacock and want to vote for him. They run around the house shouting his name. I didn’t know quite how to take that, frankly – who needs enemies when you’ve got family like that! Luckily he’s the loveliest bloke. Maybe his loved ones might vote for me…”

TVT: When are you at your bravest?

Davood: “I’m quite brave with animals. I used to have snakes when I was a kid and I’m not scared of spiders, I’m happy to fish them out the bath. When I met my wife at university she picked up a spider with her hands and I knew she was the girl for me!”

Debbie: “I love horror movies, I never used to when I was young but now I enjoy all the old hammy ones, like the Hammer House of Horrors.”

Gemma: “I love anything that gets your adrenaline going – I’ve done two Sky dives, bungee jumping, swimming with sharks – I was scared but in a good way! Aljaz always tells me it’s good to be frightened before our dances too.”

Debbie McGee Strictly

Magical Debbie’s scored highly this series

TVT: Would you spend the night at a haunted house?

Debbie:” I’d love something like that! I don’t believe in ghosts, I’m not superstitious at all, so I think it’s all a bit of fun. Having lived with a magician who did special effects for movies and musicals I learned a lot about how they make all those things happen. I enjoy trying to work out how they do the tricks.”

Gemma: “I’d love to find anywhere that’s haunted and walk round to see if I could see anything, I’m really into stuff like that, psychics and spirits. I believe when a person passes on they must go somewhere…”

Davood: “My parents live in a really old 16th century cottage and I was there on my own once. I was excited to have the place to myself but then I started hearing footsteps and seeing things behind me in the mirror. I didn’t believe in any of that before but I’m 100% sure there was something in there with me… When I left home I bought a much newer house!”

Strictly continues on Saturday night at 6.35pm.

Photos by Dan Goldsmith.

 

 

 

 

Article source: http://www.whatsontv.co.uk/strictly-come-dancing/strictly-news/exclusive-strictly-spook-tacular-500232/

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Man jumped into canal to save pet rat – Connacht Tribune

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 23, 2017 in Rat News
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Upper Canal Road

A drunken chef jumped into the canal to rescue his pet rat which had escaped from his pocket into the water.

Gardai called to the scene by concerned passers-by found Dawid Szerner (39), with former addresses in Lurgan Park, Renmore, and the Fairgreen Hostel, back on dry land but soaking wet and very intoxicated.

Szerner, who has since moved to Mallow in Co Cork, appeared before Galway District Court this week where he denied he was intoxicated or that he breached the peace by engaging in threatening, abusive and insulting words or behaviour towards two Gardai at Upper Canal Road on September 6 last year.

He also denied two additional charges of refusing to leave the area when directed to do so by a Gardaí and of resisting arrest on the same occasion.

The accused did plead guilty to separate charges of being intoxicated in public and to breaching the peace at Shop Street on January 21 last.

Garda Anne-Marie Conroy told the hearing she and Garda Carmel Higgins responded to a call at 6.10pm on September 6 last year that a male had entered the water at Canal Road.

They arrived at the scene to find the accused out of the water.  He was intoxicated and became very abusive and aggressive towards Garda Conroy when she asked if he was okay and then asked for his details.

“He called us pigs and f**kers and everything else under the sun,”   Garda Conroy said.

Szerner remained very aggressive and had to be restrained by both Gardai.  All three fell to the ground as both Gardai tried to hang onto him.

Another passer-by became concerned for their safety and rang the Garda Station to send reinforcements.  Two male Gardaí arrived on the scene and, between them, the four Gardaí managed to effect an arrest.

In reply to defence solicitor, John Martin during cross-examination, Garda Conroy said Szerner had a friend with him at the time who was sober, but Szerner refused to leave the area for the Gardai and go home with his friend.

“He had a rat in his pocket which jumped out of his pocket into the water and he jumped in to retrieve it,” Mr Martin explained.

Garda Conroy said Szerner had told her at the scene that he had wanted to release his pet rat into the water.

Mr Martin said his client’s house was searched the following day by other Gardai and when he returned there later, his landlord told him to leave within 24 hours. He said Szerner arrived here from Poland 13 years ago and had worked as a  chef in a city centre hostelry.

Judge Fahy was dismayed to hear someone who kept rats was also working with food at the same time.

Szerner said that rats are very clean and clean themselves every five minutes.

Garda Carmel Higgins told the hearing that when she and Garda Conroy received the call initially of a male being in the water, they thought he was attempting to take his own life.

She concurred Szerner was highly intoxicated and very aggressive.

Szerner told the court his friend had minded his two pet rats while he went to a party the night before.

He said he was walking home from his friend’s house the evening with the rats in his pockets when one of them suddenly jumped out into the water and swam away.

He said his main concern was getting his rat back when it jumped into the water and he didn’t remember calling the Gardaí names.  He said the Gardai would not listen to him when he tried to tell them about the rat swimming away and he became annoyed with them.

“They wouldn’t listen to me and they wouldn’t let me rescue my pet,” he added.

During cross-examination by inspector Brendan Carroll, Szerner claimed that a second rat, which he said was in his other pocket, was “smashed” while he was being restrained on the ground. “He is dead. My friend took a picture,” Szerner said.

Insp Carroll put it to him that his friend was not in court to give evidence.  He put it to Szerner that he was very aggressive and resisted arrest and that was why extra Garda were called to the scene.

“I was very stressed because one of my rats was in the water and I knew I had lost him forever,” Szerner replied.

Judge Fahy said both Gardaí had given cogent evidence and while Szerner kept referring to a ‘friend’ there was nobody in court to back up his version of events.

Insp Carroll said that in relation to the public order offences which occurred in Shop Street on January 12 last, Szerner approached Garda Michael Gallagher while he was dealing with another incident.  He was intoxicated at the time and became very abusive and aggressive towards Garda Gallagher.

Judge Fahy sentenced him to two months in prison for refusing to leave the Canal Road area for Garda Conroy and she imposed a consecutive one-month sentence on him for breaching the peace on the same occasion.

She suspended both sentences for twelve months on condition he be of good behaviour and stay away from Galway City for the period of the suspension.

Fines totalling €200 were imposed for being drunk in public on both occasions, while the charge of resisting arrest was dismissed on a technicality.  Leave to appeal was granted.

Article source: http://connachttribune.ie/man-jumped-into-canal-to-save-pet-rat-440/

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From Captain Gary Ziltoid to Lady Flora Penelope, meet Battersea’s dogs and cats with the quirkiest names

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 21, 2017 in Rat News
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We all like to get creative when it comes to naming our pets, right?

My first pet was Oink the guinea pig and I went on to name a naughty pair of pet rats as Harry and Ron, before re-homing Skunk – a very fluffy black and white hamster.

The team at Battersea Dogs Cats Home welcome a lot of adorable furries through their doors and as you can imagine, not all of them have the well, the most normal of names.

To celebrate the launch of the sixth series of the award-winning show, Paul O’Grady: For the Love of Dogs which aired on Thursday evening (October 19), the charity animal home has released its top five most unusual names.

Read More

Headlines for animal lovers

Out of the 3,600 dogs who were welcomed to the shelter in Battersea Park Road, Black Trouser was crowned this year’s canine with the quirkiest name.

The smiley six-month-old mongrel arrived in May because his owners could no longer care for him and he has since been re-homed and renamed Fudge.

Captain Gary Ziltoid, an eight-week old puppy who came to the centre in March, was a close second while Peewee the tiny Jack Russell who arrived weighing just 2.8kg came third in the weird name stakes.

Food-based names also seemed to be a theme of 2017, with Wasabi, Poptart, Popcorn and Nacho among the more unusual appetising canine names.

View gallery

The full list of unusual dog names:

  1. Black Trouser
  2. Captain Gary Ziltoid
  3. Peewee
  4. Wasabi
  5. Miss Doris Badger

Say hello to Peewee, the tiny Jack Russell
(Image: Battersea Dogs and Cats Home)

But let’s not forget the gorgeous felines who are also homed at the Battersea shelter.

The cats have also had their fair share of eccentric names including one-eyed Captain Cat Sparrow, the sophisticated Tortoiseshell Debbie Hairy and the three-legged Mr Wobbles.

The full list of eccentric cat names:

  1. Captain Cat Sparrow
  2. Debbie Hairy
  3. Mr Wobbles
  4. Captain Pugwash
  5. Lady Flora Penelope

Captain Pugwash is still looking for a loving home, but he isn’t the only one.

Can you give Captain Pugwash a loving home?
(Image: Battersea Dogs and Cats Home)

Centre manager Robert Young said: “Our staff name all the strays that are brought into Battersea – but two thirds of the dogs and cats that arrive here are brought in by their owners, who can no longer care for them.

“These pets already have names of their own, and we’ve certainly seen some unusual ones over the years, including a Staffie named Lord Farquaad and a cat called Beetlejuice.

“Considering we care for more than 7,000 animals each year, it’s inevitable that there will be a few quirky names among them and we’re always on the lookout for the next unusual entrant.”

Article source: http://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/local-news/captain-gary-ziltoid-lady-flora-13790411

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Dead animals left on LaFayette lawn lead deputies to take kids, 17 …

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 18, 2017 in Rat News
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LAFAYETTE, N.Y. — National Grid workers were on a call Tuesday in LaFayette when they found two dead animals on a front lawn, deputies said.

The animals’ bodies were left in cages in front of 3384 Route 11, said Sgt. Jon Seeber, an Onondaga County Sheriff’s Office spokesman. They were so decomposed that it was impossible to tell what kind of animals they were, he said.

Deputies were called to the home at 3:40 p.m.

When they arrived, deputies discovered three children and more than a dozen animals were living in “deplorable” conditions, Seeber said. Insects — including fleas and ticks — had infested the inside of the feces-covered home, he said.

The homeowner, Melissa Spencer, was charged with endangering the welfare of the children who lived in her home and animal cruelty.

Workers with the Central New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals responded to the home to help remove 17 animals. Dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, pet rats, ferrets and guinea pigs were taken from the residence, Seeber said.

Due to the condition of the home, Onondaga County Child Protective Services workers also responded. The children are staying with a family friend, Seeber said.

LaFayette’s code officer has deemed the Route 11 home uninhabitable, Seeber said.

Deputies charged Spencer with three counts of endangering the welfare of a child, a misdemeanor. The SPCA charged her with animal cruelty.

Spencer was released from custody on an appearance ticket, Seeber said. She is due to appear in LaFayette Town Court on Oct. 25.

Article source: http://www.syracuse.com/crime/index.ssf/2017/10/dead_animals_left_on_lafayette_lawn_lead_deputies_to_take_children_17_pets_from.html

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Infection with Rare Virus Traced to Teen’s Pet Rats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 16, 2017 in Rat News
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A mother and her daughter in Tennessee were infected with a virus rarely seen in the United States, and the culprit seems to be pet rats.

The two women tested positive for the Seoul virus, according to a new report, published today (Oct. 12) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Seoul virus is part of the Hantavirus family, a group of viruses that typically infect rodents.

The CDC reported in January that there was an outbreak of the virus among rat breeders and owners in Illinois and Wisconsin; that same month, the Tennessee Department of Health was notified of an individual with pet rats from one of the Illinois breeders with infected rats, according to the new report. [10 Deadly Diseases That Hopped Across Species]

In fact, the owner of the pet rats, an 18-year-old, had gotten sick in December 2016 with an “unspecified viral illness,” the researchers said. She recovered fully from the virus without treatment. A test on a preserved sample of her blood that had been drawn when she was sick revealed that she had been infected with the Seoul virus.  

The teenager didn’t let health officials test her pet rats for the virus, but the officials presumed that the rodents also had the virus. As such, the officials recommended that the rats be euthanized. Once again, the teen refused. In response, the Tennessee Department of Health prohibited the teen from removing the rats from her home, essentially quarantining the pets. In addition, they educated the teen and her family about the best ways to avoid infection, which include avoiding contact with rodent urine, droppings, saliva and nesting material, according to the report.

But in April, the teen’s 38-year-old mother got sick, too. She went to the emergency room with symptoms including a very high fever of 104.5 degrees Fahrenheit (40.3 degrees Celsius), shortness of breath, fatigue and lack of appetite, the report said. A blood test revealed that she had the Seoul virus. The mother told doctors that she had cleaned up rodent droppings from a bathtub about three weeks before she got sick.

The Seoul virus

The Seoul virus infects brown Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus), which are found worldwide, according to the report. The virus can spread easily between rats, and can also be passed from rats to humans, according to the CDC. As of January, 17 confirmed cases of the Seoul virus in people in the U.S. have been linked to rats from breeders in Illinois, the report said.

However, the virus cannot spread from human to human, according to the CDC.

Severe infections with the Seoul virus can cause a disease called hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, which includes symptoms such as internal bleeding and kidney problems, the CDC says. Most people who are infected with the Seoul virus, however, experience mild or even no symptoms, and the death rate for the disease is approximately 1 or 2 percent, the CDC says.

Indeed, the Seoul virus is less severe than another form of the hantavirus, called the Sin Nombre virus, according to the CDC. The Sin Nombre virus is spread by the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and it causes a condition called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. These infections can cause severe breathing difficulties that require hospitalization, and the death rate for the disease is about 38 percent, the CDC says.

Originally published on Live Science.

Editor’s Recommendations

Article source: https://www.yahoo.com/news/infection-rare-virus-traced-teen-123900212.html

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Rat Film

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 14, 2017 in Rat News
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Director Theo Anthony draws parallels: between statistics and hunches, between logistics and subtext, between the systemic and the everyday, between the drama of history and the total lack of histrionics required to support his 100-year-old post-apocalyptic vision of institutionalized racism. This vision is Rat Film, Anthony’s brilliant docu-essay chronicling Baltimore’s city planning and resultant systemic segregation as a microcosm of the still-failing American Urban Experiment.

In it, first we hear a voice (Maureen Jones, siri-adjacent). Amidst stark black, before we see anything we hear: “Before the world became the world it was an Egg. Inside the Egg was Dark. The rat nibbled the egg and let the Light in. And the world began.” From these first moments, Rat Film introduces the idea of creation—from whatever mythos Anthony culled this intro—not as an expansion, a pushing out, but as an illusion of growth hiding something so much more claustrophobic, so much more suffocating. Rat Film is ostensibly about Baltimore’s rat problem, about how the City has historically dealt with and studied and used parts of their poorest neighborhoods to address pest control, trial-and-erroring over decades, but as Edmund the amicable exterminator with the Baltimore City Rat Rubout Program tells us, “There ain’t never been a rat problem in Baltimore; there’s always been a people problem.”

This is the parallel Anthony most wants to explore, how systems of power treat minority and impoverished communities as lab rats, expendable and experimental. The path he treads wanders wildly—his film a weaving, loosely tracked tone poem, its free form in direct opposition to the boundaries and strictures imposed on the aforementioned communities, human and rodent alike—but his themes are always clear, and the points he makes always buttressed by simple, unadorned facts. When he couples a near-nauseous digital video of a rat attempting to escape a trash can in a back alley with voice-over monotoning, “The adult Norway rat can jump 32 inches high. Baltimore city trash cans are 34 inches high,” we understand, precisely, Anthony’s logic. Baltimore is a city built to sequester, and in turn neuter, those populations with which it’d rather not deal.

In 1911, we’re told, the City of Baltimore passed a law which essentially divided neighborhoods along racial lines, passing “the nation’s first legislation of its kind.” Six years later, the Supreme Court outlawed such legislation, which only drove the sources behind such segregation further into the private sector‚—where that power always wanted to be anyway. Anthony then details how Baltimore institution Johns Hopkins University utilized such preternatural, physical class distinctions as ready-made laboratories to study rodent populations, especially in the context of rat control. Anthony’s historic documents—photographs, maps, letters, news articles—he wields with Ken Burns-like precision, demonstrating both in-depth research and a journalist’s eye for sussing out the larger ideas behind the cold facts. All of it culminates in a heartbreaking tale of how a Baltimore denizen’s barn was converted into a warehouse space wherein Johns Hopkins scientists built a cloistered rat colony, observing how isolation manifested in a rat community. The results are, of course, devastating—the rats stratified themselves, setting up ersatz social classes and generally massacring the weak, including rat babies—mostly because of how Anthony’s seeded the injustice of anti-miscegenation into his film so that, by the time poindexters in thick-rimmed glasses are smugly grinning, posing next to their sad rat prison, the audience knows exactly what Anthony’s implying.

Alongside his historic through line, Anthony presents vignettes and mini-profiles of Baltimore residents. There’s Edmund, whom we follow on assorted house calls, but there’s also a couple who have a meticulously crafted rat room in their house where their pet rats can roam free, a pair of rat hunters who sit outside of alleyways literally fishing for rats to pulverize with a baseball bat, a standard middle class Millennial who displays his arsenal of rat-murdering weapons, and musician Dan Deacon, who not only provides the film’s (wonderful and, if you’ve ever heard Deacon’s music, unexpectedly unhurried) score, but who we watch composing that score, using rat brain scans in consort with censors converting the movement of rats trapped in transparent plexiglass displays to sound. In these moments with Deacon, we are present for one of the film’s most lasting images: rats, confined, piling into a corner with nowhere to go, escaping apparently nothing but attempting to escape nonetheless.

These many threads and faces and stories wind around one another as Rat Film moves toward a final point—its final point being the same point upon which it started, so anticlimactic and graceful that it hardly bears repeating, only watching, over and over and over. Anthony’s is the rare film that thrives in its parts rather than in the sum of them, though the sum is breathlessly simple, to the extent that one wonders why no film has ever connected the lines—lined up the parallels—as Anthony has. Because that sum is a feeling limned in symbology, a feeling of strangulation, of universes crammed into ill-fitting spaces, taming and domesticating the Other through literally squeezing the life out of them.

Near the end of the film, Anthony returns to a 3-D map of Baltimore he introduced at the beginning of the film, implying how a whole city can be represented in, say, Google Earth, but that once a user attempts to see into the pixelated apartment buildings and crumbling neighborhoods, the program defaults, replacing unknowns with visions of the cosmos. He pushes the camera, the POV, through the walls of a digital building; the floorboards are missing, and in their places is the blackness of space, punctuated by constellations of stars, as if, with nothing in the way, Google Earth has no choice but to stare into the abyss of Space. The image is mundane, but in Anthony’s hands it’s arresting, speaking for the millions of lives displaced by a century of American “progress.” The abandoned house is the Egg, and Anthony’s camera is the rat, nibbling at the edifice, just trying, however futile, to let the light in.

Director: Theo Anthony
Writer: Theo Anthony
Release Date: October 13, 2017


Dom Sinacola is Associate Movies Editor at Paste and a Portland-based writer. You can follow him on Twitter.

Article source: https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2017/10/rat-film.html

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Rare virus traced to teen’s pet rats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 13, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

Severe infections with the Seoul virus can cause a disease called hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, which includes symptoms such as internal bleeding and kidney problems.

 (iStock)

A mother and her daughter in Tennessee were infected with a virus rarely seen in the United States, and the culprit seems to be pet rats.

The two women tested positive for the Seoul virus, according to a new report, published today (Oct. 12) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Seoul virus is part of the Hantavirus family, a group of viruses that typically infect rodents.

The CDC reported in January that there was an outbreak of the virus among rat breeders and owners in Illinois and Wisconsin; that same month, the Tennessee Department of Health was notified of an individual with pet rats from one of the Illinois breeders with infected rats, according to the new report. 

In fact, the owner of the pet rats, an 18-year-old, had gotten sick in December 2016 with an “unspecified viral illness,” the researchers said. She recovered fully from the virus without treatment. A test on a preserved sample of her blood that had been drawn when she was sick revealed that she had been infected with the Seoul virus.  

The teenager didn’t let health officials test her pet rats for the virus, but the officials presumed that the rodents also had the virus. As such, the officials recommended that the rats be euthanized. Once again, the teen refused. In response, the Tennessee Department of Health prohibited the teen from removing the rats from her home, essentially quarantining the pets. In addition, they educated the teen and her family about the best ways to avoid infection, which include avoiding contact with rodent urine, droppings, saliva and nesting material, according to the report.

But in April, the teen’s 38-year-old mother got sick, too. She went to the emergency room with symptoms including a very high fever of 104.5 degrees Fahrenheit (40.3 degrees Celsius), shortness of breath, fatigue and lack of appetite, the report said. A blood test revealed that she had the Seoul virus. The mother told doctors that she had cleaned up rodent droppings from a bathtub about three weeks before she got sick.

The Seoul virus

The Seoul virus infects brown Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus), which are found worldwide, according to the report. The virus can spread easily between rats, and can also be passed from rats to humans, according to the CDC. As of January, 17 confirmed cases of the Seoul virus in people in the U.S. have been linked to rats from breeders in Illinois, the report said.

However, the virus cannot spread from human to human, according to the CDC.

More on this…

Severe infections with the Seoul virus can cause a disease called hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, which includes symptoms such as internal bleeding and kidney problems, the CDC says. Most people who are infected with the Seoul virus, however, experience mild or even no symptoms, and the death rate for the disease is approximately 1 or 2 percent, the CDC says.

Indeed, the Seoul virus is less severe than another form of the hantavirus, called the Sin Nombre virus, according to the CDC. The Sin Nombre virus is spread by the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and it causes a condition called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. These infections can cause severe breathing difficulties that require hospitalization, and the death rate for the disease is about 38 percent, the CDC says.

Originally published on Live Science.

Article source: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/10/13/rare-virus-traced-to-teens-pet-rats.html

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Infection with Rare Virus Traced to Teen’s Pet Rats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 12, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

A mother and her daughter in Tennessee were infected with a virus rarely seen in the United States, and the culprit seems to be pet rats.

The two women tested positive for the Seoul virus, according to a new report, published today (Oct. 12) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Seoul virus is part of the Hantavirus family, a group of viruses that typically infect rodents.

The CDC reported in January that there was an outbreak of the virus among rat breeders and owners in Illinois and Wisconsin; that same month, the Tennessee Department of Health was notified of an individual with pet rats from one of the Illinois breeders with infected rats, according to the new report. [10 Deadly Diseases That Hopped Across Species]

In fact, the owner of the pet rats, an 18-year-old, had gotten sick in December 2016 with an “unspecified viral illness,” the researchers said. She recovered fully from the virus without treatment. A test on a preserved sample of her blood that had been drawn when she was sick revealed that she had been infected with the Seoul virus.  

The teenager didn’t let health officials test her pet rats for the virus, but the officials presumed that the rodents also had the virus. As such, the officials recommended that the rats be euthanized. Once again, the teen refused. In response, the Tennessee Department of Health prohibited the teen from removing the rats from her home, essentially quarantining the pets. In addition, they educated the teen and her family about the best ways to avoid infection, which include avoiding contact with rodent urine, droppings, saliva and nesting material, according to the report.

But in April, the teen’s 38-year-old mother got sick, too. She went to the emergency room with symptoms including a very high fever of 104.5 degrees Fahrenheit (40.3 degrees Celsius), shortness of breath, fatigue and lack of appetite, the report said. A blood test revealed that she had the Seoul virus. The mother told doctors that she had cleaned up rodent droppings from a bathtub about three weeks before she got sick.

The Seoul virus infects brown Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus), which are found worldwide, according to the report. The virus can spread easily between rats, and can also be passed from rats to humans, according to the CDC. As of January, 17 confirmed cases of the Seoul virus in people in the U.S. have been linked to rats from breeders in Illinois, the report said.

However, the virus cannot spread from human to human, according to the CDC.

Severe infections with the Seoul virus can cause a disease called hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, which includes symptoms such as internal bleeding and kidney problems, the CDC says. Most people who are infected with the Seoul virus, however, experience mild or even no symptoms, and the death rate for the disease is approximately 1 or 2 percent, the CDC says.

Indeed, the Seoul virus is less severe than another form of the hantavirus, called the Sin Nombre virus, according to the CDC. The Sin Nombre virus is spread by the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and it causes a condition called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. These infections can cause severe breathing difficulties that require hospitalization, and the death rate for the disease is about 38 percent, the CDC says.

Originally published on Live Science.

Article source: https://www.livescience.com/60668-pet-rat-seoul-virus-outbreak.html

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