Susie Schieve column: Compassion for all creatures taught to children

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Jan 7, 2018 in Rat News | Subscribe

As long as I can remember I have felt a need to help animals. My mother was always rescuing cats and dogs from shelters, or the city pound as it was called in those days.

Even though my mother was quite sophisticated and a fastidious housekeeper, no animal was ever left out in the cold. One spring, she bottle-fed a baby squirrel that had fallen out of our oak tree. My Easter chickens would grow to adulthood, and I raised many ducklings that we would take to the lake cottage. Animals were a part of my family and we all coexisted well together. The only time I caught grief from my mother was when I brought the blanket from my horse and put it in her washing machine.

When I had a family of my own, dogs, cats, Guinea pigs, rats, horses and even baby raccoons were a part of our household. For many years, I would foster and bottle-feed the raccoon babies. My daughters would help, and the little creatures would become a family project.

I treasure the fact that as a child I was encouraged and taught compassion for all living creatures, and I wanted my own daughters to have that experience as well. My three daughters are now rescuing dogs and cats with special needs.

Kelly, my daughter in Minneapolis, has rescued three greyhounds. One of her greyhounds was diagnosed with bone cancer in a front leg that required an amputation. Through that experience she has rescued two dogs with three legs. Both dogs were from Safe Hands shelter in Kentucky. One dog had been in a Walmart parking lot for two days with a severed leg; the other was a tiny puppy brought into the shelter in a box with her littermates. When the shelter workers lifted the puppies from the box they discovered one of little Phoebe’s legs was ripped off to the shoulder. She was immediately flown to Minneapolis to a rescue.

Kelly, because of her experience, was called to foster this pup of 6 pounds. Now Phoebe Rose is a beautiful full-grown husky who has become a permanent part of their household.

This behavior perpetuates itself. Now Kelly’s daughter, Brynn, is studying to be a special education teacher at the University of Minnesota.

Jennifer, my middle daughter, rescues dogs and cats that have special needs. Ernie, a Jack Russell terrier whom she found in the downtown Detroit shelter, had many behavioral issues but he was loved for 17 years. Yellow was a 15-year-old cat when she adopted him. Recently she took into her home from a rescue a crippled 10-year-old bowlegged Chihuahua. She and her family named her Rosa. Rosa is gaining strength through long walks and is loved.

Elizabeth, my daughter in Dallas, adopted a feral Jack Russell terrier that was scheduled to be euthanized. Pinky is now socialized and a happy pup. Elizabeth’s children have three pet rats.

Just like people with special needs, these special animals will bring love and happiness to their families.

Susie Schieve, executive director of the Madison County Humane Society, writes a column that appears the first Sunday of each month. She can be reached through sydneyschieve@aol.com or the Humane Society at 2219 Crystal St., Anderson.

Article source: http://www.heraldbulletin.com/opinion/columns/susie-schieve-column-compassion-for-all-creatures-taught-to-children/article_c980d59d-0aef-5745-99a3-d8979c7d60ba.html

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Susie Schieve column: Compassion for all creatures taught to children

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Jan 7, 2018 in Rat News | Subscribe

As long as I can remember I have felt a need to help animals. My mother was always rescuing cats and dogs from shelters, or the city pound as it was called in those days.

Even though my mother was quite sophisticated and a fastidious housekeeper, no animal was ever left out in the cold. One spring, she bottle-fed a baby squirrel that had fallen out of our oak tree. My Easter chickens would grow to adulthood, and I raised many ducklings that we would take to the lake cottage. Animals were a part of my family and we all coexisted well together. The only time I caught grief from my mother was when I brought the blanket from my horse and put it in her washing machine.

When I had a family of my own, dogs, cats, Guinea pigs, rats, horses and even baby raccoons were a part of our household. For many years, I would foster and bottle-feed the raccoon babies. My daughters would help, and the little creatures would become a family project.

I treasure the fact that as a child I was encouraged and taught compassion for all living creatures, and I wanted my own daughters to have that experience as well. My three daughters are now rescuing dogs and cats with special needs.

Kelly, my daughter in Minneapolis, has rescued three greyhounds. One of her greyhounds was diagnosed with bone cancer in a front leg that required an amputation. Through that experience she has rescued two dogs with three legs. Both dogs were from Safe Hands shelter in Kentucky. One dog had been in a Walmart parking lot for two days with a severed leg; the other was a tiny puppy brought into the shelter in a box with her littermates. When the shelter workers lifted the puppies from the box they discovered one of little Phoebe’s legs was ripped off to the shoulder. She was immediately flown to Minneapolis to a rescue.

Kelly, because of her experience, was called to foster this pup of 6 pounds. Now Phoebe Rose is a beautiful full-grown husky who has become a permanent part of their household.

This behavior perpetuates itself. Now Kelly’s daughter, Brynn, is studying to be a special education teacher at the University of Minnesota.

Jennifer, my middle daughter, rescues dogs and cats that have special needs. Ernie, a Jack Russell terrier whom she found in the downtown Detroit shelter, had many behavioral issues but he was loved for 17 years. Yellow was a 15-year-old cat when she adopted him. Recently she took into her home from a rescue a crippled 10-year-old bowlegged Chihuahua. She and her family named her Rosa. Rosa is gaining strength through long walks and is loved.

Elizabeth, my daughter in Dallas, adopted a feral Jack Russell terrier that was scheduled to be euthanized. Pinky is now socialized and a happy pup. Elizabeth’s children have three pet rats.

Just like people with special needs, these special animals will bring love and happiness to their families.

Susie Schieve, executive director of the Madison County Humane Society, writes a column that appears the first Sunday of each month. She can be reached through sydneyschieve@aol.com or the Humane Society at 2219 Crystal St., Anderson.

Article source: http://www.heraldbulletin.com/opinion/columns/susie-schieve-column-compassion-for-all-creatures-taught-to-children/article_c980d59d-0aef-5745-99a3-d8979c7d60ba.html

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