Resident steps on big surprise

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Jan 7, 2014 in Rat Answers | Subscribe

Folks who live out in the country are somewhat used to running into wildlife on the land. Oklahoma has a variety of notable critters ranging from bald eagles, to horned toads, elk and a slew of snake species. Jim Butler’s new year started with a big wild cold exotic surprise. Stepping into his unheated workshop his foot trod upon a very big and thankfully very dead nearly seven foot long serpent, that was obviously not native to these parts. The deceased reptile was of a tan coloration either a boa or python marked with diamonds, obviously an exotic constrictor native to the warmer climes of Central and South America, not an area seven miles south of Sapulpa. “It was dead when I put my foot on it. I don’t know if it was killed out on the road and someone put it in my shop,” Butler said suspecting a potential friend’s prank. The frozen stiff snake showed no outward signs of trauma, and may have been a loose an escaped pet kept by a neighbor that just succumbed to the cold. Butler 81, has been relatively calm over the surprise discovery, as a rural hay rancher and horseman he has seen a fair share of the native snake population. “I respect them, and don’t have a fit over seeing one,” he said. Among the largest snakes to be found in Oklahoma is the non-venomous bullsnake. A fully grown adult will average six feet in length and very rarely they have been found up to eight feet four inches long. The bullsnake is harmless to people and considered a friend to mankind in that it eats rats and rattlesnakes. Guinness World Record keepers mark the largest snake in the USA by length as a reticulated python named Medusa. The 350 pound ten year old snake is a resident of Kansas City and was very carefully measured at 25 feet two inches in Oct. of 2011. Oklahoma state law mandates that persons owning exotic animals (including large constrictors) obtain a special permit. Oklahoma’s Exotic Animal Law states that anyone wishing to possess wildlife, which can also include exotic animals for pets, must have the same permit that an individual would need for possessing or raising these animals for commercial purposes. With this law, it is important for anyone wishing to have an exotic animal for a pet in Oklahoma to study and research the law in order to become aware of the permits necessary and the procedure required to acquire such permits. Oklahoma Statute Title 29, §4-107 is the law responsible for regulating possession of wildlife or exotic animals either as pets or as a commercial venture. According to this state law, no one can possess, breed or raise any wild animal without first applying for and receiving a license or permit from the Director of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. The exception to this law are fish, aquatic reptiles, amphibians, aquatic invertebrates and exotic livestock. The Director of Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation can issue a license to anyone who he believes is acting in good faith and whom the director believes will not violate any State of Oklahoma laws while possessing this license. The licensee also has to prove to the director that they will not obtain any brood stock he may use in any illegal BY JOHN BROCK HERALD STAFF WRITER Folks who live out in the country are somewhat used to running into wildlife on the land. Oklahoma has a variety of notable critters ranging from bald eagles, to horned toads, elk and a slew of snake species. Jim Butler’s new year started with a big wild cold exotic surprise. Stepping into his unheated workshop his foot trod upon a very big and thankfully very dead nearly seven foot long serpent, that was obviously not native to these parts. The deceased reptile was of a tan coloration either a boa or python marked with diamonds, obviously an exotic constrictor native to the warmer climes of Central and South America, not an area seven miles south of Sapulpa. “It was dead when I put my foot on it. I don’t know if it was killed out on the road and someone put it in my shop,” Butler said suspecting a potential friend’s prank. The frozen stiff snake showed no outward signs of trauma, and may have been a loose an escaped pet kept by a neighbor that just succumbed to the cold. Butler 81, has been relatively calm over the surprise discovery, as a rural hay rancher and horseman he has seen a fair share of the native snake population. “I respect them, and don’t have a fit over seeing one,” he said. Among the largest snakes to be found in Oklahoma is the non-venomous bullsnake. A fully grown adult will average six feet in length and very rarely they have been found up to eight feet four inches long. The bullsnake is harmless to people and considered a friend to mankind in that it eats rats and rattlesnakes. Guinness World Record keepers mark the largest snake in the USA by length as a reticulated python named Medusa. The 350 pound ten year old snake is a resident of Kansas City and was very carefully measured at 25 feet two inches in Oct. of 2011. Oklahoma state law mandates that persons owning exotic animals (including large constrictors) obtain a special permit. Oklahoma’s Exotic Animal Law states that anyone wishing to possess wildlife, which can also include exotic animals for pets, must have the same permit that an individual would need for possessing or raising these animals for commercial purposes. With this law, it is important for anyone wishing to have an exotic animal for a pet in Oklahoma to study and research the law in order to become aware of the permits necessary and the procedure required to acquire such permits. Oklahoma Statute Title 29, §4-107 is the law responsible for regulating possession of wildlife or exotic animals either as pets or as a commercial venture. According to this state law, no one can possess, breed or raise any wild animal without first applying for and receiving a license or permit from the Director of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. The exception to this law are fish, aquatic reptiles, amphibians, aquatic invertebrates and exotic livestock. The Director of Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation can issue a license to anyone who he believes is acting in good faith and whom the director believes will not violate any State of Oklahoma laws while possessing this license. The licensee also has to prove to the director that they will not obtain any brood stock he may use in any illegal

Article source: http://sapulpaheraldonline.com/articles/2014/01/07/news/doc52c6f04dae6ca617778715.txt

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