Virus carried by pet rats found in Pennsylvania – Tribune

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Mar 10, 2017 in Rat News
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Article source: http://triblive.com/state/pennsylvania/11955704-74/virus-health-seoul

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Pet rats from El Paso County linked to multi-state virus outbreak

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Mar 9, 2017 in Rat News
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People can contract the diseases if they come into contact with urine, droppings, or saliva of infected rodents. The virus is not known to spread from person to person, El Paso County public health said in a statement.

The virus can lead to unpleasant symptoms – fever, headache, chills, nausea, and rashes – and, in rare cases, kidney disease, kidney failure or both. Most infections include only moderate symptoms.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, rats infected with the virus are also in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah and Wisconsin.

The infection may spread if people inhale small particles of contaminated materials, or if the materials are exposed to broken skin or eyes, noses or mouths. People who handle rodents may also contract the virus if bitten by an infected animal.

Anyone who has had contact with rats recently and experienced symptoms should call their healthcare provider, public health officials advised

For people with pet rats, El Paso County health offered these tips to avoid infection:

-Cover all cuts and scratches before handling rats and wash hands after.

-Don’t keep rats in an area where food is served or in a child’s bedroom, especially when the child is younger than 5.

-Materials for keeping rats, such as cages, bedding, and food and water containers, should not be cleaned in kitchens. Gloves and a face mask should be used to clean the materials.

-Avoid sweeping or vacuuming up rodent urine, droppings or nests, which can disperse small airborne particles of contaminated materials.

-Don’t eat or drink near pet rats.

Contact Rachel Riley: 636-0108

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated the source of the outbreak. The origins of the outbreak are Wisconsin and Illinois.

Article source: http://gazette.com/pet-rats-from-el-paso-county-linked-to-multi-state-virus-outbreak/article/1596972

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Rat Film

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Mar 8, 2017 in Rat News
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rat-film-poster

True/False 2017 Review

Cinema Guild; 82 minutes

Director: Theo Anthony

Written by on March 7, 2017 




A horror movie. A nature documentary. An anthropological study. A history lesson. A social justice statement. All plus more. Rat Film is one of the most original films of the year, fiction or nonfiction, and it made me feel both as if I had learned a semester’s worth of knowledge and bereft of any idea as to how society’s problems can be mended.

The problem in question is not, as one character says early in the movie, a rat problem. “Baltimore’s never had a rat problem; only a human problem.” Rats, biologically similar enough to humans to act as ideal medical research test subjects, live in symbiosis with us. Where we fail to effectively organize our living conditions, they thrive. And they perhaps mirror us on more than a physical level. One scientist constructed a “rat city,” which over time exploded in population and then became striated into castes. Adipose alpha rats lived well with masses of females in the upper levels while peasant rats tore each other apart for scraps down below. In Baltimore, in neighborhoods whose economic destines were set in stone by redlining nearly a century ago, people deal with the pests in their own novel ways, in between the basic steps for everyday survival.

rat-film-2

Rat Film switches between their stories, anecdotes about rat studies, lessons on economic inequality throughout the 20th century, and far stranger things. We get a first-person tour through crude CG video game recreation of Baltimore, and get to see a starry void when the camera clips through the seams of the environment. In the same way, director Theo Anthony approaches this topic not from any one or two traditional angle but from every possible angle, turning it inside-out and observing from outside dimensions. We see dollhouse recreations of crime scenes in an archive of forensic science, and then a larger version of such in a training center for forensic investigators. The line between the human’s-eye and rat’s-eye view rots as you watch.

Presiding over all is the unnervingly calm voice of a female narrator, who speaks not as if delivering exposition but like an AI instructor from a thousand years in the future. Even as the audience gets to absorb the past with dispassion, their own present is treated in a similar manner. The social problem of poverty will persist, but the current particulars of that problem will one day be artifacts, to be learned with unemotional diligence by whoever cares to look back.

rat-film-1

And then there is the visceral revulsion at that which crawls or creeps. Few documentaries cut to their titles from a jump scare, but Rat Film is swarmed with filthy vermin. Even the cute pet rats we meet induce unease, seeming less domesticated than inappropriately appropriated. And then there are the rats who live mere days or hours before being fed to snakes…

Rat Film stalks between being repellent, riveting, and darkly humorous (you will learn so many ways to kill rats, including with a fishing rod). It’s an experimental documentary that’s unusually accessible, even if it will turn many a viewer’s stomach. Ultimately, it’s most haunting not for its vision of urban decay, but for its wistful positing of an ideal society which is able to erase it – contrasted with the stark light of reality.

Rat Film screened at True/False 2017 and will be released by Cinema Guild.


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Article source: https://thefilmstage.com/reviews/truefalse-review-rat-film-is-one-of-the-years-most-original-films/

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Utah County resident suffers rare hantavirus infection | fox13now.com

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Mar 7, 2017 in Rat News
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PROVO, Utah — The Utah County Health Department reports a resident of the county has been infected with a rare type of hantavirus called “Seoul virus.”

“This wasn’t just your average pet owner,” said Steve Mickelson, Utah County Health Department Director of Nurses. “This is a person who no longer breeds pets, but has in the past.”

Seoul virus is carried by rats, and the Centers for Disease Control recently identified pet rats as the source of a multi-state outbreak in 15 states, UCHD said in a news release issued Tuesday.

Seoul virus symptoms in humans include fever, intense headache, back and abdominal pain, chills, blurred vision, nausea, flushing of the face, rash and inflammation and redness of the eyes, according to UCHD. Symptoms usually begin within one to two weeks of exposure, but, in rare cases, may take up to eight weeks to develop.

Most people infected with Seoul virus won’t have symptoms, UCHD said, and others will have only mild symptoms. In rare cases, a Seoul virus infection can lead to a type of renal (kidney) disease.

The CDC and UCHD are investigating this and other recent Seoul virus infections related to a home-based rat breeding facility in Wisconsin. Two people who operated that facility were infected and hospitalized in December. Those two people, the CDC said, had purchased rats from animal suppliers in Wisconsin and Illinois. Six other people who tested positive for Seoul virus infection were linked to two ratteries in Illinois.

“Pet stores bring them in from all over,” Mickelson said. However, not all pet stores buy pet rats from breeders. Some shop owners prefer breeding their own pet rats for safety purposes. However, most pet shops do buy feeding rats from breeders. Feeding rats are used as food for other animals, usually reptiles.

Further investigation by the CDC, along with state and local health departments, revealed infected rats may have been distributed or received in Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah and Wisconsin.

“Individuals with rats as pets are encouraged to follow health and cleaning precautions. We are working with the CDC and UDOH to protect the
health of Utah County residents,” said UCHD Director Ralph Clegg in the news release.

The UCHD offered the following tips for avoiding becoming ill with Seoul virus and other diseases carried by rodents:

  • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after handling pets or areas where pets
    have been.
  • Keep small pets and their cages out of kitchens or other areas where food is served.
  • Pet cages, bedding, toys, food or water containers should be cleaned away from areas
    where food is served or people may bathe.
  • Use gloves and a face mask for cleaning.
  • Avoid creating dust from fecal materials by wetting down bedding and disinfecting it.
  • Do not sweep or vacuum up rodent urine, droppings, or nests as this creates airborne
    particles.
  • Cover cuts and scratches before handling your pet.
  • Don’t keep small pets in a child’s bedroom, especially children younger than five years.
  • Don’t snuggle or kiss small pets, touch your mouth after handling small pets, or eat or
    drink around them.

Article source: http://fox13now.com/2017/02/14/utah-county-resident-suffers-rare-hantavirus-infection/

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Outbreak of rat virus reaches region

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Mar 6, 2017 in Rat News
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WATERLOO REGION — A Kitchener rat-breeding operation has shut down after two people connected to the business were infected with Seoul virus, a serious illness transmitted by the rodents.

The two local cases, which investigators believe may be linked to a larger outbreak in the U.S., has health authorities urging anyone with prolonged exposure to rats to visit a doctor for a blood test.

Since the virus can feel like the flu, other people may have been infected and not know it.

“If people have a pet rat, or work in the rat industry and are concerned about their health, they really should be seeking medical attention,” said Brenda Miller, manager of health protection and investigation with the Region of Waterloo Public Health unit.

“We don’t know there are not other cases out there, but we will know if people go to seek medical attention.”

Although rats don’t show symptoms of the disease, people concerned a rat they bought in the past few months is infected are being told to ask their veterinarian if testing is needed. If the rat is infected, it will carry the virus for life.

Seoul virus, spread through rat bites or contact with urine, feces, saliva or contaminated bedding, can’t be treated in humans and in some cases can lead to a serious condition called hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. That can cause low blood pressure, shock and critical kidney failure.

Most people, however, may only develop mild symptoms or none at all. Typical symptoms of the virus include fever, headaches, back and abdominal pain, chills, blurred vision, redness of the eyes and rashes.

So far, there are three confirmed human cases of the virus in Ontario. Of the two infected locally, one person went to a doctor after feeling ill, and the other showed no signs but was tested because of their exposure.

Ontario’s Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, meanwhile, is investigating the source of the illnesses, and looking at any possible connections to an outbreak of 16 human cases in the U.S.

Public health officials believe the health risk to Ontarians is low, because Seoul virus is not spread from person to person, but rather directly from exposure to rats.

The affected business, Pixie’s Pocket Pets of Kitchener, has suspended its breeding operation and stopped selling the rodents until further testing can be completed. Owner Carol Gamble posted on Facebook a few weeks ago that she was waiting for the outbreak to pass.

“This means I will not be pairing anymore rats for the time being, no new rats will be coming in and no rats will be going out,” she wrote.

Gamble, whose business was not revealed by public health officials, couldn’t be reached for this story. The business’s Facebook page has since been taken down.

News of the larger Seoul virus outbreak has rippled through the rat breeding industry.

“It’s very serious … it spreads like wildfire. If one were to catch it, it would wipe out our entire colony,” said Chantal Warner, owner of Rattastic Ratteries in Kitchener.

“They’d all have to be euthanized. That would kill our business.”

Warner, who’s been selling pet rats since 2009, says since learning of the virus she’s refusing to buy any new rats, has tested all her animals, and only sells to homes that can prove they’re virus-free. She’s even installed a foot wash station for her volunteers.

She adds anyone who wants to buy a pet rat should make sure it’s coming from a reputable breeder whose animals have a proven lineage and have been cleared by a veterinarian.

“All my rats, before they go to a home, they’re vetted and have proof they’re Seoul virus-free,” Warner said. “We’re going to huge lengths because none of us want to see that happen.”

People with pet rats should also be able to ask the breeder they bought it from if their stock is part of the population being investigated, Miller said.

Health officials are reminding rat owners to exercise caution in handling the animals. Rats’ cages and bedding should be disinfected, and hands should be washed immediately after touching them.

If a rat tests positive for Seoul virus, it should be destroyed.

“Most people will go that option, because there is no vaccine to prevent it from contaminating the rest of their stock,” Miller said. “But that’s typically done on a volunteer basis.”

Young children, pregnant women, those with weakened immune systems and the elderly are especially vulnerable to infection, she added.

Article source: http://www.therecord.com/news-story/7169066-outbreak-of-rat-virus-reaches-region/

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Two human cases of rat-transmitted virus in Waterloo Region – 570 …

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Mar 5, 2017 in Rat News
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Something to keep in mind if you have pet rats or work with the animal; two cases of Seoul virus have popped up in Waterloo Region.

The virus can only be transmitted to people from rats through bite wounds or exposure to urine, feces, saliva or contaminated bedding.

A person can get the virus by simply cleaning out their pet’s cage.

Brenda Miller, Manager of Health Protection and Investigation with Region of Waterloo Public Health says the two cases involved people who had pet rats. They got their pets from the same local rattery.

Although Public Health cannot identify the rattery, they can confirm it has been shut down for an investigation.

They add there is a very low risk of the virus spreading to the general public and if you do have the virus, your body will most likely be able to fight it off on its own.

A person infected with Seoul virus may not develop symptoms or will only develop very mild symptoms. However, in some instances, more severe symptoms may include fever, severe headache, back and abdominal pain, chills, blurred vision, redness of the eyes, or rash.

For the rat though, this is a lifetime diagnosis.

Seoul virus cannot spread person to person.

Article source: http://www.570news.com/2017/03/02/two-human-cases-rat-transmitted-virus-waterloo-region/

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Outbreak of rat virus reaches region – The Record

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Mar 4, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

WATERLOO REGION — A Kitchener rat-breeding operation has shut down after two people connected to the business were infected with Seoul virus, a serious illness transmitted by the rodents.

The two local cases, which investigators believe may be linked to a larger outbreak in the U.S., has health authorities urging anyone with prolonged exposure to rats to visit a doctor for a blood test.

Since the virus can feel like the flu, other people may have been infected and not know it.

“If people have a pet rat, or work in the rat industry and are concerned about their health, they really should be seeking medical attention,” said Brenda Miller, manager of health protection and investigation with the Region of Waterloo Public Health unit.

“We don’t know there are not other cases out there, but we will know if people go to seek medical attention.”

Although rats don’t show symptoms of the disease, people concerned a rat they bought in the past few months is infected are being told to ask their veterinarian if testing is needed. If the rat is infected, it will carry the virus for life.

Seoul virus, spread through rat bites or contact with urine, feces, saliva or contaminated bedding, can’t be treated in humans and in some cases can lead to a serious condition called hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. That can cause low blood pressure, shock and critical kidney failure.

Most people, however, may only develop mild symptoms or none at all. Typical symptoms of the virus include fever, headaches, back and abdominal pain, chills, blurred vision, redness of the eyes and rashes.

So far, there are three confirmed human cases of the virus in Ontario. Of the two infected locally, one person went to a doctor after feeling ill, and the other showed no signs but was tested because of their exposure.

Ontario’s Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, meanwhile, is investigating the source of the illnesses, and looking at any possible connections to an outbreak of 16 human cases in the U.S.

Public health officials believe the health risk to Ontarians is low, because Seoul virus is not spread from person to person, but rather directly from exposure to rats.

The affected business, Pixie’s Pocket Pets of Kitchener, has suspended its breeding operation and stopped selling the rodents until further testing can be completed. Owner Carol Gamble posted on Facebook a few weeks ago that she was waiting for the outbreak to pass.

“This means I will not be pairing anymore rats for the time being, no new rats will be coming in and no rats will be going out,” she wrote.

Gamble, whose business was not revealed by public health officials, couldn’t be reached for this story. The business’s Facebook page has since been taken down.

News of the larger Seoul virus outbreak has rippled through the rat breeding industry.

“It’s very serious … it spreads like wildfire. If one were to catch it, it would wipe out our entire colony,” said Chantal Warner, owner of Rattastic Ratteries in Kitchener.

“They’d all have to be euthanized. That would kill our business.”

Warner, who’s been selling pet rats since 2009, says since learning of the virus she’s refusing to buy any new rats, has tested all her animals, and only sells to homes that can prove they’re virus-free. She’s even installed a foot wash station for her volunteers.

She adds anyone who wants to buy a pet rat should make sure it’s coming from a reputable breeder whose animals have a proven lineage and have been cleared by a veterinarian.

“All my rats, before they go to a home, they’re vetted and have proof they’re Seoul virus-free,” Warner said. “We’re going to huge lengths because none of us want to see that happen.”

People with pet rats should also be able to ask the breeder they bought it from if their stock is part of the population being investigated, Miller said.

Health officials are reminding rat owners to exercise caution in handling the animals. Rats’ cages and bedding should be disinfected, and hands should be washed immediately after touching them.

If a rat tests positive for Seoul virus, it should be destroyed.

“Most people will go that option, because there is no vaccine to prevent it from contaminating the rest of their stock,” Miller said. “But that’s typically done on a volunteer basis.”

Young children, pregnant women, those with weakened immune systems and the elderly are especially vulnerable to infection, she added.

Article source: http://www.therecord.com/news-story/7169066-outbreak-of-rat-virus-reaches-region/

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15 reasons why rats should be your next pet

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Mar 3, 2017 in Rat News
Closed
15 reasons why rats should be your next pet
Just look at that face (Picture: Getty)

Rats have the same problem as parking wardens and kale – everyone has an opinion on them, and it’s usually not a good one.

They’ve suffered a PR crisis for years, and not even a talented ambassador like Ratatouille made much of a difference to their public image.

How this man went from eating McDonald’s in bed to running marathons

But did you know that rats are actually cleaner than cats?

Or that they can actually laugh?

Yes, there are plenty of reasons to love these rodents and here are 15 on why they make great pets.

1. They’re a regal choice as pets

Fancy blue agouti rat perches legs splayed on seat of black leather chair, sniffing air, San Jose.
(Picture: Getty)

Queen Victoria is one of the main reasons why rats have become household pets.

Her famous rat catcher, Jack Black, was able to train them to do nifty tricks and even dressed them up to impress Her Majesty.

2. Celebrities like ‘em too

From Paris Hilton to John Cleese, rats have scuttled their way into the homes of the famous.

Angelina Jolie had a pet rat too, but was forced to give it up when it ate all her curtains.

3. They are clean

Believe it or not, rats are thought to groom themselves more frequently and diligently than cats do.

Their tongues are rough, which helps keep their coats clean from dirt.

They can even be trained to use litter boxes.

clean

4. They can chuckle

Yes, the vilified rodents have been known to giggle. Scientist have even found that rats ‘enjoy’ being tickled, but only if they are in a good mood.

A bit like the rest of us then.

5. They are their own dentist

Rats’ front teeth grow 4.5 to 5.5 inches each year, but they wear them down by continuously gnawing on absolutely everything around them.

6. There’s a temple dedicated to them

There’s a Hindu temple dedicated to the rat goddess Karni Mata in Deshnoke, India, which houses more than 20,000 rats.

Many people travel from far and wide to pay their respects. 

Rats drink milk from a dish in The Karni Mata temple. The rats are worshipped as holy creatures. Deshnoke, Rajasthan, India
Some of the rats drinking milk at The Karni Mata temple (Picture: Getty)

7. They’re smart and empathetic

‘Rats are intelligent, highly social and inquisitive animals. They spend lots of time exploring and playing,’ according to Dr Jane Tyson, Scientific Officer at the RSPCA.

8. They form life-long bonds

Anyone who has a pet rat knows that they recognise their owners and respond to their sight and voice.

They are very social and love to hang out with human family members on the couch or on peoples’ shoulders or in their laps.

9. They’re actually more popular than you think

The Pet Food Manufacturing Association (PFMA) estimated that there are about 100,000 pet rats kept in the UK.

surprise

10. They may have been unfairly blamed for the plague

The Black Death of the 14th century is usually blamed on rats, though a brand new study published last year suggests that the warm climate in Asia – where the plague originated – meant that the culprits were in fact giant gerbils.

11. You will be more like Ron Weasley if you have one

After the filming of ‘Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban’, Rupert Grint (aka Ron Weasley) decided to adopt the two rats used to play his pet in the film, Scabbers, because he loved them so much.

12. They’re easy to feed

Rats eat commercial diets in the form of ‘rat blocks’, which are nutritionally-complete pellets available at pet stores.

You can also feed vegetables straight from your kitchen, such as peas, bananas, apples, and broccoli.

Orange rat eating a checkered cake with orange icing.
Don’t feed them cake though (Picture: Getty)

13. You can train them to do tricks

They have even been likened to ‘pocket sized dogs’ because of their ability to learn nifty tricks.

14. They’re low maintenance

Rats don’t bark, need to go outside to do their business or require daily walks, making them ideal pets.

15. They’re can be good pets for kids

Along with guinea pigs, pet rats make good pets for young people to help care for.

Once settled into their new home, and when they become used to their owner, they will happily sit on shoulders or play with people.

MORE: 15 reasons schnauzers are the best dogs in the world

MORE: 15 things you probably didn’t know about horses

MORE: 15 of the weirdest perfumes in the world

Article source: http://metro.co.uk/2017/03/03/15-reasons-why-rats-should-be-your-next-pet-6452857/

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Two human cases of rat-transmitted virus in Waterloo Region

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Mar 2, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

Something to keep in mind if you have pet rats or work with the animal; two cases of Seoul virus have popped up in Waterloo Region.

The virus can only be transmitted to people from rats through bite wounds or exposure to urine, feces, saliva or contaminated bedding.

A person can get the virus by simply cleaning out their pet’s cage.

Brenda Miller, Manager of Health Protection and Investigation with Region of Waterloo Public Health says the two cases involved people who had pet rats. They got their pets from the same local rattery.

Although Public Health cannot identify the rattery, they can confirm it has been shut down for an investigation.

They add there is a very low risk of the virus spreading to the general public and if you do have the virus, your body will most likely be able to fight it off on its own.

A person infected with Seoul virus may not develop symptoms or will only develop very mild symptoms. However, in some instances, more severe symptoms may include fever, severe headache, back and abdominal pain, chills, blurred vision, redness of the eyes, or rash.

For the rat though, this is a lifetime diagnosis.

Seoul virus cannot spread person to person.

Article source: http://www.570news.com/2017/03/02/two-human-cases-rat-transmitted-virus-waterloo-region/

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Outbreak of Seoul virus in humans linked to pet rats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Mar 1, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

An outbreak of Seoul virus linked to pet rats had infected at least 13 people as of Feb. 15. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was assisting health officials in 15 states in investigating the outbreak.

Two individuals who operated a home-based rat-breeding facility in Wisconsin became ill in December 2016. One was hospitalized. The ill individuals purchased rats from suppliers in Wisconsin and Illinois. The investigation into the outbreak revealed additional people who tested positive for Seoul virus.

Seoul virus is a member of the Hantavirus family of rodent-borne viruses and is carried in the wild by Norway rats. The virus does not make rats sick, but people can become infected through exposure to infectious body fluids or bites from infected rats. There is no evidence of human-to-human transmission of Seoul virus. The virus is found in rats throughout the world, but most human infections are recorded in Asia.

The investigation into the outbreak indicated that potentially infected rodents might have been distributed or received in Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin.

Related JAVMA content:

Article source: https://www.avma.org/News/JAVMANews/Pages/170315g.aspx

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