‘Long-lasting’ sunscreens may be wearing off within hours and risk skin damage, consumer group says

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 28, 2016 in Rat News
Closed

A number of popular ‘long-lasting’ sunscreens may not be providing the coverage they claim as they wear off within hours a consumer watchdog has warned.

Four leading high street brands which bill their sunscreen as ‘once a day’ products have allegedly been found to wear off to the extent that their sun protection factor falls by 74 per cent after six to eight hours. This means that over the course of a day a SPF30 ‘once a day’ cream could drop to SPF8 coverage.

The four sunscreens tested by Which? were Soltan Once Invisible 8hr Sun Protection SP30, Piz Buin 1 Day Long SPF30, Riemann P20 Once A Day Sun Protection SPF30 and UltraSun Family SPF30.

The consumer watchdog conducted the trials on the products using British Standard tests, whereby the creams were applied to the backs of volunteers who then spent a day sitting on a chair in laboratories wearing a t-shirt. After six to eight hours (depending on how long the product claimed to last) the creams’ sun protection capabilities were then retested.


Alex Neill, Which? Director of Policy and Campaigns, said: ““Our testing shows that these sunscreens just don’t live up to their ‘once-a-day’ claims so people should reapply sunscreens regularly to ensure they have protection from the sun.

“With more than 100,000 people diagnosed with skin cancer in the UK each year, some manufacturers need to do more to ensure their sunscreens live up to the claims on the packaging.”

  • 1/22

    New online test predicts skin cancer risk

    Health experts have created a new online tool which can predict a person’s risk of developing a common form of skin cancer. The tool uses the results of a 10-question-quiz to estimate the chance of a person aged 40 or over of having non-melanoma skin cancers within three years. Factors including the age, gender, smoking status, skin colour, tanning ability, freckling tendency, and other aspects of medical history are covered by the quiz

  • 2/22

    Multiple Sclerosis stem cell treatment ‘helps patients walk again’

    A new treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) has enabled some patients to walk again by “rebooting” their immune systems. As part of a clinical trial at Sheffield’s Royal Hallamshire Hospital involving around 20 patients, scientists used stem cells to carry out a bone marrow transplant. The method known as an autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) works by using chemotherapy to destroy the area of the immune system which causes MS

  • 3/22

    Dementia patients left without painkillers and handcuffed to bed

    Dementia patients experience a ‘shocking’ variation in the quality of hospital care they receive across England, a charity has warned. Staff using excessive force and not giving dementia patients the correct pain medication were among the findings outlined in a new report by The Alzheimer’s Society, to coincide with the launch of Fix Dementia Care campaign

  • 4/22

    Cancer risk ‘increased’ by drinking more than one glass of wine or pint of beer per day

    Drinking more than one glass of wine or pint of beer a day increases the risk of developing cancer, according to medical experts. New guidelines for alcohol consumption by the UK published by chief medical officers warn that drinking any level of alcohol has been linked to a range of different cancers. The evidence from the Committee on Carcinogenicity (COC) overturns the oft-held view that a glass of red wine can have significant medical benefits for both men and women

  • 5/22

    Vaping ‘no better’ than smoking regular cigarettes

    Vaping could be “no better” than smoking regular cigarettes and may be linked to cancer, scientists have found. The study which showed that vapour from e-cigarettes can damage or kill human cells was publsihed as the devices are to be rolled out by UK public health officials as an aid to quit smoking from 2016. An estimated 2.6 million people in the UK currently use e-cigarettes

  • 6/22

    Rat-bite fever

    A teenager was hospitalised and left unable to move after she developed the rare rat-bite fever disease from her pet rodents which lived in her bedroom. The teenager, who has not been named, was taken to hospital after she complained of a pain in her right hip and lower back which later made her immobile, according to the online medical journal BMJ Case Reports. She suffered for two weeks with an intermittent fever, nausea and vomiting and had a pink rash on her hands and feet. The teenager, who had numerous pets including a dog, cat, horse and three pet rats, has since made a full recovery after undergoing a course of antibiotics. Blood tests showed that she was infected with for streptobacillus moniliformis – the most common cause of rat-bite fever. One of her three pet rats lay dead in her room for three weeks before her symptoms showed

  • 7/22

    Taking antidepressants in pregnancy ‘could double the risk of autism in toddlers’

    Taking antidepressants during pregnancy could almost double the risk of a child being diagnosed with autism in the first years of life, a major study of nearly 150,000 pregnancies has suggested. Researchers have found a link between women in the later stages of pregnancy who were prescribed one of the most common types of antidepressant drugs, and autism diagnosed in children under seven years of age

  • 8/22

    Warning over Calpol

    Parents have been warned that giving children paracetamol-based medicines such as Calpol and Disprol too often could lead to serious health issues later in life. Leading paediatrician and professor of general paediatrics at University College London, Alastair Sutcliffe, said parents were overusing paracetamol to treat mild fevers. As a result, the risk of developing asthma, as well as kidney, heart and liver damage is heightened

  • 9/22

    Fat loss from pancreas ‘can reverse’ effects of type-2 diabetes

    Less than half a teaspoon of fat is all that it takes to turn someone into a type-2 diabetic according to a study that could overturn conventional wisdom on a disease affecting nearly 3 million people in Britain. Researchers have found it is not so much the overall body fat that is important in determining the onset of type-2 diabetes but the small amount of fat deposited in the pancreas, the endocrine organ responsible for insulin production

  • 10/22

    Potatoes reduce risk of stomach cancer

    Scientists have found people who eat large amounts of white vegetables were a third less likely to contract stomach cancer. The study, undertaken by Chinese scientists at Zhejiang University, found eating cauliflower, potatoes and onions reduces the chance of contracting stomach cancer but that beer, spirits, salt and preserved foods increased a person’s risk of the cancer

  • 11/22

    Connections between brain cells destroyed in early stages of Alzheimer’s disease

    Scientists have pinpointed how connections in the brain are destroyed in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, in a study which it is hoped will help in the development of treatments for the debilitating condition. At the early stages of the development of Alzheimer’s disease the synapses – which connect the neurons in the brain – are destroyed, according to researchers at the University of New South Wales, Australia. The synapses are vital for brain function, particularly learning and forming memories

  • 12/22

    Sugar tax

    The Government should introduce a sugar tax to prevent an “obesity crisis” from crippling the NHS, a senior Conservative MP and former health minister has said. Dr Dan Poulter believes that the case for increased taxes on unhealthy sugary products was “increasingly compelling”

    PA

  • 13/22

    Cancer breakthrough offers new hope for survivors rendered infertile by chemotherapy

    A potentially “phenomenal” scientific breakthrough has offered fresh hope to cancer patients rendered infertile by chemotherapy. For the first time, researchers managed to restore ovaries in mice affected by chemotherapy so that they were able to have offspring. The scientists now plan to begin clinical trials to see if the technique, which involves the use of stem cells, will also work in humans by using umbilical cord material and possibly stem cells taken from human embryos, if regulators agree

  • 14/22

    Take this NHS test to find out if you have a cancerous mole

    An interactive test could help flag up whether you should seek advice from a health professional for one of the most common types of cancer. The test is available on the NHS Choices website and reveals whether you are at risk from the disease and recommends if you should seek help. The mole self-assessment factors in elements such as complexion, the number of times you have been severely sunburnt and whether skin cancer runs in your family. It also quizzes you on the number of moles you have and whether there have been any changes in appearance regarding size, shape and colour

  • 15/22

    Health apps approved by NHS ‘may put users at risk of identity theft’

    Experts have warned that some apps do not adequately protect personal information

  • 16/22

    A watchdog has said that care visits must last longer

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) said home help visits of less than 30 minutes were not acceptable unless part of a wider package of support

  • 17/22

    Pendle in Lancashire tops list of five most anxious places to live in the UK

    Pendle in Lancashire has been named the most anxious place to live in the UK, while people living in Fermanagh and Omagh in Northern Ireland have been found to be the happiest

  • 18/22

    Ketamine could be used as anti-depressant

    Researchers at the University of Auckland said monitoring the effects of the drug on the brain has revealed neural pathways that could aid the development of fast-acting medications.
    Ketamine is a synthetic compound used as an off anaesthetic and analgesic drug, but is commonly used illegally as a hallucinogenic party drug.
    Dr Suresh Muthukumaraswamy, a senior researcher at the university and a member of the institution’s Centre for Brain Research, used the latest technology in brain imaging to investigate what mechanisms ketamine uses to be active in the human brain

  • 19/22

    A prosthetic hand that lets people actually feel through

    The technology lets paralysed people feel actual sensations when touching objects — including light taps on the mechanical finger — and could be a huge breakthrough for prosthetics, according to its makers. The tool was used to let a 28-year-old man who has been paralysed for more than a decade. While prosthetics have previously been able to be controlled directly from the brain, it is the first time that signals have been successfully sent the other way

  • 20/22

    The biggest cause of early death in the world is what you eat

    Unhealthy eating has been named as the most common cause of premature death around the globe, new data has revealed. A poor diet – which involves eating too few vegetables, fruits, nuts and grains and too much red meat, salt and sugar – was shown to be a bigger killer than smoking and alcohol

  • 21/22

    Scientists develop blood test that estimates how quickly people age

    Scientists believe it could be used to predict a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease as well as the “youthfulness” of donated organs for transplant operations. The test measures the vitality of certain genes which the researchers believe is an accurate indication of a person’s “biological age”, which may be younger or older than their actual chronological age

  • 22/22

    Aspirin could help boost therapies that fight cancer

    The latest therapies that fight cancer could work better when combined with aspirin, research has suggested. Scientists from the Francis Crick Institute in London say the anti-inflammatory pain killer suppresses a cancer molecule that allows tumours to evade the body’s immune defences.
    Laboratory tests have shown that skin, breast and bowel cancer cells often generate large amounts of this molecule, called prostaglandin E2 (PGE2).
    But Aspirin is one of a family of drugs that sends messages to the brain to block production of PGE2 and this means cancer cells can be attacked by the body’s natural defences

Lisa Bickerstaffe, British Skin Foundation spokesperson, told The Independent that anyone exposed to strong suns should be vigilant about reapplying creams, regardless of claims. She said: “When considering once-a-day sunscreens, it’s worth remembering that swimming, sweating or sporting activity can all cause it to wash or wipe away. With this in mind, the British Skin Foundation believes that all sunscreens should be reapplied at least every two hours or after any sporting or swimming activities.” 

Abi Cleeve, from Ultrasun UK, told The Independent: “We understand that there are many opinions on once a day claims and these are wholly dependent on the specific formulation of individual products.The Which? findings on the performance of once a day category products has taken an average across the four brands tested. We are confident in the independent tests carried out on Ultrasun. It’s important that the industry is responsible in its communication of what long lasting broad spectrum protection can mean. Ultrasun delivers a UVA filter of over 90% for the product tested by Which?.

“In addition to our robust formula, everyone at Ultrasun always advises our customers to choose their sun product responsibly based on their own skin type, and to ensure that time in the sun is punctuated with regular shade breaks rather than long uninterrupted exposure. With a shelf life of 2 years after opening against an industry average of 12 months we continue to offer our customers great value for money in using Ultrasun from year to year.” 

A spokesperson for Boots said on behalf of Sultan: “At Boots, customer safety is paramount and we rigorously and independently test our products to ensure the appropriate level of safety and efficacy. We are confident that all of our sun care products, including Boots Soltan Once 8 Hour Sun protection SPF30, meet the SPF labelling claim and customers can rely on them to provide the level of protection expected over the specified time frame.

“It is expected that the level of SPF in any ‘once a day’ sun protection will reduce throughout the day. This is why we formulate Boots Soltan Once 8 Hour Sun Protection SPF30 to a higher level of SPF so that our customers can be confident it will not reduce below SPF 30 and they will get the right level of protection for a full eight hours. In addition we always advise our customers to enjoy the sun safely and we recommend re-applying any sun protection after spending time in the water or towelling dry.”

Dr Chris Flower Director-General of Cosmetic Toiletries and Perfumes Association, told The Independent: “Which? has set up its test for ‘extended wear’ products very strangely. Manufacturers test products in circumstances related to normal or expected use. We normally apply sunscreen to areas of skin that will be exposed to the sun but we don’t apply sunscreen to areas that will remain covered under clothes. Exposed areas will not be subject to rubbing against a t-shirt for six to eight hours, so we feel this is unrealistic as a test and we believe the criticisms from Which? are not justified.”

Piz Buin did not respond when approached for comment by The Independent.

  • More about:
  • Sunscreen
  • sun cream
  • Health
  • Skin
  • Dermatology

Article source: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/long-lasting-sunscreens-may-be-wearing-off-within-hours-and-risking-skin-damage-watchdog-says-a7050876.html

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Allow antibiotics that cause nasty side-effects to help stop rise of untreatable infections, expert says

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 27, 2016 in Rat News
Closed

Regulations on side-effects should be relaxed to allow the creation of new ‘antibiotics of last resort’ which make people sick but kill infections that have become resistant to other drugs, according to a leading microbiologist.

Dr Paul Hoskisson, a member of the Microbiology Society Council, warned that the world could be as little as 10 years away from the “terrifying” point at which many infections start to become untreatable.

That would mean a small scratch could prove fatal while transplants and other major operations would become too risky to perform.

He spoke out as David Cameron, who is currently at the G7 Summit in Japan, announced new targets to limit the “inappropriate use” of antibiotics and kickstart the stalled effort to create new drugs.

American researchers have also revealed that they had found someone with a strain of E. coli bacteria that is resistant to the current antibiotic of last resort, colistin, for the first time in the US.

That prompted Tom Frieden, director of the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, to warn that “the end of the road isn’t very far away for antibiotics”.  Colistin resistance has already been found in China and parts of Africa and Europe, including the UK

Dr Hoskisson, of Strathclyde University, said researchers had already discovered most of easy targets to make antibiotic drugs and the search for new ones was now much harder.

Asked if the world was at risk of returning to the days when a scratch while gardening could result in death, he said: “I don’t think we are too far away from that at the moment. 

“I think even more stark than that is people forget how antibiotics are used routinely in hospital. If you go in for abdominal surgery you are prescribed antibiotics as a prophylactic against infection.

“It would be the end of transplants, major surgeries, because you just couldn’t take the risk anymore.

“If we return to a pre-antibiotic era, the advances made in modern medicine in terms of the treatment of diseases and surgeries … we’ll go back to square one.

“It’s terrifying, isn’t it?”


Part of the problem, he said, was the drug companies have little financial incentive to spend large amount of money on research into new antibiotics, given the whole point is they are only sparingly used for the worst kind of infections.

“The resistance to antibiotics is inevitable, we always have to have drugs in the pipeline,” Dr Hoskisson said. “Unfortunately the pipeline is no longer like a running tap, it’s a very slow drip.”

He said the tight controls on antibiotics meant they were “very safe” – particularly compared to cancer drugs that make people vomit and lose their hair.

“For an antibiotic, the rules are very much more strict in terms of the side-effects that are permitted,” he said.

“But we may find in 10 or 15 years, once these drugs stop working and that really is a worry, many people may develop infections in the future and we will have no drugs.

“The regulatory process is a very good thing, but we need to maybe rethink our strategy of how we do drug discovery and also bring drugs to market.

“I think we need some kind of change for last-line-of-resort antibiotics, to potentially allow more side-effects.

“It could be things like sickness … some people have diarrhoea.”

Last week, a report on the results of a Government-commissioned review of the use of antibiotics by Jim O’Neill, an economist and former chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management, concluded that urgent action was needed to avoid paying a “terrible human and economic cost” as they stop working.

  • 1/22

    New online test predicts skin cancer risk

    Health experts have created a new online tool which can predict a person’s risk of developing a common form of skin cancer. The tool uses the results of a 10-question-quiz to estimate the chance of a person aged 40 or over of having non-melanoma skin cancers within three years. Factors including the age, gender, smoking status, skin colour, tanning ability, freckling tendency, and other aspects of medical history are covered by the quiz

  • 2/22

    Multiple Sclerosis stem cell treatment ‘helps patients walk again’

    A new treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) has enabled some patients to walk again by “rebooting” their immune systems. As part of a clinical trial at Sheffield’s Royal Hallamshire Hospital involving around 20 patients, scientists used stem cells to carry out a bone marrow transplant. The method known as an autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) works by using chemotherapy to destroy the area of the immune system which causes MS

  • 3/22

    Dementia patients left without painkillers and handcuffed to bed

    Dementia patients experience a ‘shocking’ variation in the quality of hospital care they receive across England, a charity has warned. Staff using excessive force and not giving dementia patients the correct pain medication were among the findings outlined in a new report by The Alzheimer’s Society, to coincide with the launch of Fix Dementia Care campaign

  • 4/22

    Cancer risk ‘increased’ by drinking more than one glass of wine or pint of beer per day

    Drinking more than one glass of wine or pint of beer a day increases the risk of developing cancer, according to medical experts. New guidelines for alcohol consumption by the UK published by chief medical officers warn that drinking any level of alcohol has been linked to a range of different cancers. The evidence from the Committee on Carcinogenicity (COC) overturns the oft-held view that a glass of red wine can have significant medical benefits for both men and women

  • 5/22

    Vaping ‘no better’ than smoking regular cigarettes

    Vaping could be “no better” than smoking regular cigarettes and may be linked to cancer, scientists have found. The study which showed that vapour from e-cigarettes can damage or kill human cells was publsihed as the devices are to be rolled out by UK public health officials as an aid to quit smoking from 2016. An estimated 2.6 million people in the UK currently use e-cigarettes

  • 6/22

    Rat-bite fever

    A teenager was hospitalised and left unable to move after she developed the rare rat-bite fever disease from her pet rodents which lived in her bedroom. The teenager, who has not been named, was taken to hospital after she complained of a pain in her right hip and lower back which later made her immobile, according to the online medical journal BMJ Case Reports. She suffered for two weeks with an intermittent fever, nausea and vomiting and had a pink rash on her hands and feet. The teenager, who had numerous pets including a dog, cat, horse and three pet rats, has since made a full recovery after undergoing a course of antibiotics. Blood tests showed that she was infected with for streptobacillus moniliformis – the most common cause of rat-bite fever. One of her three pet rats lay dead in her room for three weeks before her symptoms showed

  • 7/22

    Taking antidepressants in pregnancy ‘could double the risk of autism in toddlers’

    Taking antidepressants during pregnancy could almost double the risk of a child being diagnosed with autism in the first years of life, a major study of nearly 150,000 pregnancies has suggested. Researchers have found a link between women in the later stages of pregnancy who were prescribed one of the most common types of antidepressant drugs, and autism diagnosed in children under seven years of age

  • 8/22

    Warning over Calpol

    Parents have been warned that giving children paracetamol-based medicines such as Calpol and Disprol too often could lead to serious health issues later in life. Leading paediatrician and professor of general paediatrics at University College London, Alastair Sutcliffe, said parents were overusing paracetamol to treat mild fevers. As a result, the risk of developing asthma, as well as kidney, heart and liver damage is heightened

  • 9/22

    Fat loss from pancreas ‘can reverse’ effects of type-2 diabetes

    Less than half a teaspoon of fat is all that it takes to turn someone into a type-2 diabetic according to a study that could overturn conventional wisdom on a disease affecting nearly 3 million people in Britain. Researchers have found it is not so much the overall body fat that is important in determining the onset of type-2 diabetes but the small amount of fat deposited in the pancreas, the endocrine organ responsible for insulin production

  • 10/22

    Potatoes reduce risk of stomach cancer

    Scientists have found people who eat large amounts of white vegetables were a third less likely to contract stomach cancer. The study, undertaken by Chinese scientists at Zhejiang University, found eating cauliflower, potatoes and onions reduces the chance of contracting stomach cancer but that beer, spirits, salt and preserved foods increased a person’s risk of the cancer

  • 11/22

    Connections between brain cells destroyed in early stages of Alzheimer’s disease

    Scientists have pinpointed how connections in the brain are destroyed in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, in a study which it is hoped will help in the development of treatments for the debilitating condition. At the early stages of the development of Alzheimer’s disease the synapses – which connect the neurons in the brain – are destroyed, according to researchers at the University of New South Wales, Australia. The synapses are vital for brain function, particularly learning and forming memories

  • 12/22

    Sugar tax

    The Government should introduce a sugar tax to prevent an “obesity crisis” from crippling the NHS, a senior Conservative MP and former health minister has said. Dr Dan Poulter believes that the case for increased taxes on unhealthy sugary products was “increasingly compelling”

    PA

  • 13/22

    Cancer breakthrough offers new hope for survivors rendered infertile by chemotherapy

    A potentially “phenomenal” scientific breakthrough has offered fresh hope to cancer patients rendered infertile by chemotherapy. For the first time, researchers managed to restore ovaries in mice affected by chemotherapy so that they were able to have offspring. The scientists now plan to begin clinical trials to see if the technique, which involves the use of stem cells, will also work in humans by using umbilical cord material and possibly stem cells taken from human embryos, if regulators agree

  • 14/22

    Take this NHS test to find out if you have a cancerous mole

    An interactive test could help flag up whether you should seek advice from a health professional for one of the most common types of cancer. The test is available on the NHS Choices website and reveals whether you are at risk from the disease and recommends if you should seek help. The mole self-assessment factors in elements such as complexion, the number of times you have been severely sunburnt and whether skin cancer runs in your family. It also quizzes you on the number of moles you have and whether there have been any changes in appearance regarding size, shape and colour

  • 15/22

    Health apps approved by NHS ‘may put users at risk of identity theft’

    Experts have warned that some apps do not adequately protect personal information

  • 16/22

    A watchdog has said that care visits must last longer

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) said home help visits of less than 30 minutes were not acceptable unless part of a wider package of support

  • 17/22

    Pendle in Lancashire tops list of five most anxious places to live in the UK

    Pendle in Lancashire has been named the most anxious place to live in the UK, while people living in Fermanagh and Omagh in Northern Ireland have been found to be the happiest

  • 18/22

    Ketamine could be used as anti-depressant

    Researchers at the University of Auckland said monitoring the effects of the drug on the brain has revealed neural pathways that could aid the development of fast-acting medications.
    Ketamine is a synthetic compound used as an off anaesthetic and analgesic drug, but is commonly used illegally as a hallucinogenic party drug.
    Dr Suresh Muthukumaraswamy, a senior researcher at the university and a member of the institution’s Centre for Brain Research, used the latest technology in brain imaging to investigate what mechanisms ketamine uses to be active in the human brain

  • 19/22

    A prosthetic hand that lets people actually feel through

    The technology lets paralysed people feel actual sensations when touching objects — including light taps on the mechanical finger — and could be a huge breakthrough for prosthetics, according to its makers. The tool was used to let a 28-year-old man who has been paralysed for more than a decade. While prosthetics have previously been able to be controlled directly from the brain, it is the first time that signals have been successfully sent the other way

  • 20/22

    The biggest cause of early death in the world is what you eat

    Unhealthy eating has been named as the most common cause of premature death around the globe, new data has revealed. A poor diet – which involves eating too few vegetables, fruits, nuts and grains and too much red meat, salt and sugar – was shown to be a bigger killer than smoking and alcohol

  • 21/22

    Scientists develop blood test that estimates how quickly people age

    Scientists believe it could be used to predict a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease as well as the “youthfulness” of donated organs for transplant operations. The test measures the vitality of certain genes which the researchers believe is an accurate indication of a person’s “biological age”, which may be younger or older than their actual chronological age

  • 22/22

    Aspirin could help boost therapies that fight cancer

    The latest therapies that fight cancer could work better when combined with aspirin, research has suggested. Scientists from the Francis Crick Institute in London say the anti-inflammatory pain killer suppresses a cancer molecule that allows tumours to evade the body’s immune defences.
    Laboratory tests have shown that skin, breast and bowel cancer cells often generate large amounts of this molecule, called prostaglandin E2 (PGE2).
    But Aspirin is one of a family of drugs that sends messages to the brain to block production of PGE2 and this means cancer cells can be attacked by the body’s natural defences

Reacting to the discovery of colistin-resistance in the US, Lord O’Neill, who is Commercial Secretary to the Treasury, said: “This worrying news just underlines how important it is for the world to agree to implement the proposals that we outlined last week, and the urgency of a G20, and separately, a United Nations’ high-level agreement, this September. 

“It is highly encouraging that our Government is taking such a lead, as evidenced by the bold announcements the Prime Minister made today in Toyko.”

The Government is still to formally respond to Lord O’Neill’s report but Mr Cameron’s announcement was broadly in line with its recommendations.

The Prime Minister said the Government would work to cut the number of hospital-acquired blood infections by 50 per cent to reduce the demand for antibiotics, set a target to reduce antibiotic use by agriculture and work with the international community to set up a global system to reward drug companies that produce new antibiotics.

  • More about:
  • Antibiotics
  • antibiotic resistance
  • antimicrobial resistance

Article source: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/antibiotics-side-effects-untreatable-infections-resistant-bacteria-antimicrobial-resistance-a7052371.html

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Rats help student excel in school and socially

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 26, 2016 in Rat News
Closed

CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO (KFVS) –

A Southeast student just got through her sophomore year a lot easier thanks to some support from some uncommon friends that live with her.

Rats.

While many people are comforted from common animals such as dogs and cats, Jessica Strunk, 20, gets her emotional support from her two pet rats, Nala and Araali. 

“They are known to be very sweet,” Strunk said. “People are always worried about getting bit but they rarely bite and have never bit me.”

So how do rats help Strunk succeed in school? 

Strunk said since they are uncommon friends, it makes for a unique way to start a conversation with others, which she said helps her socially.

Strunk suffers from anxiety and depression. Last year, she said it was a hard first year of college for her, and she didn’t know how to cope very well.

“I had a lot of problems,” Strunk said. “I even had a hard time getting out of bed.”

Things turned around for her when she got her new two friends. She said she has improved a lot in her sophomore year, in both academics and socially in life.

“They have helped me stay focused,” Strunk said. “I’ve made a lot more friends and having them has helped boost me up to do a lot more.”

Her freshman year, she made only two friends, but in her sophomore year, she made closer to 20; and it’s all thanks to the rats.

“It’s really easy to talk about them because when the hear you have rats, they want to hear about them,” Strunk said. 

We spoke with Dr. Sean Byrd at Skyview Animal Clinic in Cape Girardeau. He wasn’t surprised about rats being a pet but hasn’t heard of a rat to help someone this much before. 

“It’s the first time I’ve heard about it to this degree,” Dr. Byrd said. “I’ve definitely seen the benefits of a rat as a pet but nothing to this degree. I think it’s awesome.”

Dr. Byrd said they actually see quite a few rats as pets come in their clinic, and that number has increased over the years. 

“It surprised me when I first started how much of a personality these little guys have,” Dr. Byrd said. “We think about them as pests but the reality is these rats have been bred for domestication, and they’re pets! They’ll sleep with owners and run around the house, just like a cat or a dog.”

It’s getting more common to see a pet rat.

Dr. Byrd said he sees one about once a month now, whereas five years ago, he never saw one come in. 

“When I see somebody bring in a pet rat in here for medical help, the way that owner looks and talks about that pet rat is not any different than the way somebody else may talk about their cat or their dog,” Dr. Byrd added. “To them it’s just as much of a family member as a cat or a dog.”

While some think of rats as pests, Dr. Byrd said these little animals have blossomed and bred as household animals. 

“These rats are being bred. They’re not ones they’re finding,” Dr. Byrd said. “They’re being bred at rat breeders and there’s even designer breeds now.”

As for Strunk, having her pet rats there with her in her dorm room has some others feel a little bit uncomfortable at first.

“I haven’t had a roommate in a year,” Strunk said. “People hear the word rats and don’t want to be a part of that.”

Strunk said it’s actually more helpful living alone with her furry friends as she prefers it this way. But the others living on her floor she says accepts them like family. 

“All my friends see them as everyone’s babies,” Strunk said. “If people never met a rat, they don’t like them. But with these, they fall in love with them.”

Strunk said the university approved her having these pet animals, and they stay with her in her dorm room as part of her therapy.

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Copyright 2016 KFVS. All rights reserved.

Article source: http://www.wtoc.com/story/32066466/rats-help-student-excel-in-school-and-socially

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Rats help student excel in school and socially

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 25, 2016 in Rat News
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CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO (KFVS) –

A Southeast student just got through her sophomore year a lot easier thanks to some support from some uncommon friends that live with her.

Rats.

While many people are comforted from common animals such as dogs and cats, Jessica Strunk, 20, gets her emotional support from her two pet rats, Nala and Araali. 

“They are known to be very sweet,” Strunk said. “People are always worried about getting bit but they rarely bite and have never bit me.”

So how do rats help Strunk succeed in school? 

Strunk said since they are uncommon friends, it makes for a unique way to start a conversation with others, which she said helps her socially.

Strunk suffers from anxiety and depression. Last year, she said it was a hard first year of college for her, and she didn’t know how to cope very well.

“I had a lot of problems,” Strunk said. “I even had a hard time getting out of bed.”

Things turned around for her when she got her new two friends. She said she has improved a lot in her sophomore year, in both academics and socially in life.

“They have helped me stay focused,” Strunk said. “I’ve made a lot more friends and having them has helped boost me up to do a lot more.”

Her freshman year, she made only two friends, but in her sophomore year, she made closer to 20; and it’s all thanks to the rats.

“It’s really easy to talk about them because when the hear you have rats, they want to hear about them,” Strunk said. 

We spoke with Dr. Sean Byrd at Skyview Animal Clinic in Cape Girardeau. He wasn’t surprised about rats being a pet but hasn’t heard of a rat to help someone this much before. 

“It’s the first time I’ve heard about it to this degree,” Dr. Byrd said. “I’ve definitely seen the benefits of a rat as a pet but nothing to this degree. I think it’s awesome.”

Dr. Byrd said they actually see quite a few rats as pets come in their clinic, and that number has increased over the years. 

“It surprised me when I first started how much of a personality these little guys have,” Dr. Byrd said. “We think about them as pests but the reality is these rats have been bred for domestication, and they’re pets! They’ll sleep with owners and run around the house, just like a cat or a dog.”

It’s getting more common to see a pet rat.

Dr. Byrd said he sees one about once a month now, whereas five years ago, he never saw one come in. 

“When I see somebody bring in a pet rat in here for medical help, the way that owner looks and talks about that pet rat is not any different than the way somebody else may talk about their cat or their dog,” Dr. Byrd added. “To them it’s just as much of a family member as a cat or a dog.”

While some think of rats as pests, Dr. Byrd said these little animals have blossomed and bred as household animals. 

“These rats are being bred. They’re not ones they’re finding,” Dr. Byrd said. “They’re being bred at rat breeders and there’s even designer breeds now.”

As for Strunk, having her pet rats there with her in her dorm room has some others feel a little bit uncomfortable at first.

“I haven’t had a roommate in a year,” Strunk said. “People hear the word rats and don’t want to be a part of that.”

Strunk said it’s actually more helpful living alone with her furry friends as she prefers it this way. But the others living on her floor she says accepts them like family. 

“All my friends see them as everyone’s babies,” Strunk said. “If people never met a rat, they don’t like them. But with these, they fall in love with them.”

Strunk said the university approved her having these pet animals, and they stay with her in her dorm room as part of her therapy.

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Copyright 2016 KFVS. All rights reserved.

Article source: http://www.kfvs12.com/story/32066466/rats-help-student-excel-in-school-and-socially

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Air pollution could increase risk of stillbirth, research suggests

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 24, 2016 in Rat News
Closed

There is ‘suggestive evidence’ for a link between air pollution and a heightened risk of stillbirth, scientists have suggested.

Research has suggested a 4 ug/m3 increase in exposure to small particulate matter of less than 2.5 in diameter (PM2.5) is associated with a 2 per cent increased risk of stillbirth, along with exposure to nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide and ozone.

The findings are the result of a review into existing research on air pollution’s effects and have been published in the Occupational Environmental Medicine journal.

The study authors say they are cautious to interpret limited findings as conclusive as influential factors need to be controlled for, such as obesity, alcohol use and stress which may also influence stillbirth. They also warn air pollution rates may differ within cities as well as between them which could further influence results.

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    Cancer risk ‘increased’ by drinking more than one glass of wine or pint of beer per day

    Drinking more than one glass of wine or pint of beer a day increases the risk of developing cancer, according to medical experts. New guidelines for alcohol consumption by the UK published by chief medical officers warn that drinking any level of alcohol has been linked to a range of different cancers. The evidence from the Committee on Carcinogenicity (COC) overturns the oft-held view that a glass of red wine can have significant medical benefits for both men and women

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    Vaping ‘no better’ than smoking regular cigarettes

    Vaping could be “no better” than smoking regular cigarettes and may be linked to cancer, scientists have found. The study which showed that vapour from e-cigarettes can damage or kill human cells was publsihed as the devices are to be rolled out by UK public health officials as an aid to quit smoking from 2016. An estimated 2.6 million people in the UK currently use e-cigarettes

  • 6/22

    Rat-bite fever

    A teenager was hospitalised and left unable to move after she developed the rare rat-bite fever disease from her pet rodents which lived in her bedroom. The teenager, who has not been named, was taken to hospital after she complained of a pain in her right hip and lower back which later made her immobile, according to the online medical journal BMJ Case Reports. She suffered for two weeks with an intermittent fever, nausea and vomiting and had a pink rash on her hands and feet. The teenager, who had numerous pets including a dog, cat, horse and three pet rats, has since made a full recovery after undergoing a course of antibiotics. Blood tests showed that she was infected with for streptobacillus moniliformis – the most common cause of rat-bite fever. One of her three pet rats lay dead in her room for three weeks before her symptoms showed

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    Taking antidepressants in pregnancy ‘could double the risk of autism in toddlers’

    Taking antidepressants during pregnancy could almost double the risk of a child being diagnosed with autism in the first years of life, a major study of nearly 150,000 pregnancies has suggested. Researchers have found a link between women in the later stages of pregnancy who were prescribed one of the most common types of antidepressant drugs, and autism diagnosed in children under seven years of age

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    Warning over Calpol

    Parents have been warned that giving children paracetamol-based medicines such as Calpol and Disprol too often could lead to serious health issues later in life. Leading paediatrician and professor of general paediatrics at University College London, Alastair Sutcliffe, said parents were overusing paracetamol to treat mild fevers. As a result, the risk of developing asthma, as well as kidney, heart and liver damage is heightened

  • 9/22

    Fat loss from pancreas ‘can reverse’ effects of type-2 diabetes

    Less than half a teaspoon of fat is all that it takes to turn someone into a type-2 diabetic according to a study that could overturn conventional wisdom on a disease affecting nearly 3 million people in Britain. Researchers have found it is not so much the overall body fat that is important in determining the onset of type-2 diabetes but the small amount of fat deposited in the pancreas, the endocrine organ responsible for insulin production

  • 10/22

    Potatoes reduce risk of stomach cancer

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    PA

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    Scientists develop blood test that estimates how quickly people age

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The authors conclude: “However, the existing evidence is suggestive of causality for air pollution and stillbirth without precise identification of the timing of exposure. With the limited studies on the relevant topic, our review suggests strong priorities for future research.

“Stillbirth is one of the most neglected tragedies in global health today, and the existing evidence summarised by the authors deserves additional investigation. If the evidence of an association between ambient population and stillbirth is confirmed in future studies, it would be of major of major public health importance.”


Professor Kevin McConway, Emeritus Professor of Applied Statistics at The Open University, said the results should be interpreted cautiously:“Stillbirth is an important health problem worldwide, and there is no simple answer to the question of what causes it. Many factors contributing to stillbirth risk have been identified. Also, air pollution is known to have various adverse effects on health. So it’s natural to investigate whether there is any link between a mother’s exposure to pollutants in the air she breathes and the risk of stillbirth. Several such studies have been done in various parts of the world, and no clear pattern has emerged from their findings yet. So it made good sense for this new review to be carried out, to try to make more sense of the complexity in the individual studies.

“Since this review doesn’t provide a smoking gun (to make a dreadful pun), it’s reasonable that it calls for more and better evidence. That evidence won’t be quick or easy to find. Whether or not there’s a link to stillbirth, it remains a good idea for governments and authorities to act on air pollution, since it has so many other health consequences. And I don’t think these new findings should be a serious cause for concern for individual pregnant women – if there is an increased risk of stillbirth, this review indicates that the increase is pretty small.”

Stillbirths occur when a baby dies after 24 weeks into pregnancy, prior to 24 weeks a death is known as a miscarriage. One in every 200 births in the UK ends in a stillbirth. The reasons for stillbirths can be complex and varied, many include placental complications, infections or pre-eclampsia.

  • More about:
  • Health
  • Medicine
  • Pregnancy
  • Stillbirth
  • Science
  • Research

Article source: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/air-pollution-could-increase-risk-of-stillbirth-research-suggests-a7046201.html

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17 Roommate Horror Stories That Will Make You Cringe

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 23, 2016 in Rat News
Closed

From college roommates to Craigslist randos, you know the anxiety that comes with living with another person. You might find yourself asking, will they be clean and organized? Are they going to loudly hook up with someone every night? Are they generally sane and tolerable? While some roommate situations can spark amazing friendships, other scenarios can be total nightmares. Here, 17 people reveal some truly horrible tales that will make you consider living alone pretty much immediately. 

1. “My roommate stayed at school the week between spring and summer classes while I went home. When I returned, I found a mysterious phone charger in my room. Not thinking much of it, I put it out in the living room for its owner. Later, I told my roommate that I found a phone charger and asked if it was hers. And she says, “Oh yeah, I meant to tell you, I slept in your bed while you were gone because my boyfriend puked up red wine all over my bed. She had slept in my bed multiple nights because she was too lazy to clean her sheets and she didn’t even clean my sheets.” —Amanda, 20

2. “I walked into my roommate having sex with a guy … her boyfriend of two years wasn’t in the room with her.” —Sam, 20

3. “Having bunk beds and waking up scared that the bed is moving. Then realizing what that means, what is happening below to make the bed rock. Also, we were not close and it wasn’t with the father of her 1 year old, who woke me up crying a couple weekends. Why is a baby in a dorm? —Kristen, 22

4. “I had a horrible, nightmare roommate who had no sense of smell. Her boyfriend was a creep who lived with us without my permission and they each paid one-quarter of the rent while I paid half (he also loved to leave hair in the bathroom sink!) She got pet rats that stank, and they escaped and ate/pooped on a bunch of my stuff when I was out of the apartment on winter break.” —Kylie, 22

5. “One of her requests was that my nails and toenails always be painted. I should have known from that things would get weirder. I came home from class one day, and she had all the lights off and was just sitting in the dark. I went down the hall to hang with some friends and she came bursting through the door screaming at me. She was so hysterical, I can’t even tell you what she was saying. We all sat there in silence while she screamed and cursed at me. I slept in my friend’s dorm that night; the next day I came home from my morning class and she had moved out.” —Laura, 28

6. “During my freshman year of college, I woke up one morning to my roommate lying in her bed reading a book. That was normal. What wasn’t normal was when she realized I was awake, she told me she saw a ghost in our room last night. Apparently, it was a man who looked like a hobo and he was sitting on my bed watching me sleep. She said once she looked at him, he disappeared. I haven’t roomed with her since.” —Liz, 21

7. “She ate all of my Reese’s Peanut Butter cups. All of them. Wouldn’t restock, wouldn’t even leave the last for me. She never mentioned it or asked, so I guess she thought they were free for all?” —Hannah, 23

8. “Freshman year, my suitemate had loud shower sex with her boyfriend in our shared bathroom at 3 in the morning. She got even louder after she was told to stop.” —Taylor, 23

9. “For my freshman year, my best friend and I moved into a two-bedroom apartment together. Not even a month into moving in, I was suspicious someone was going through my stuff and decided to set my computer up to record while I was at class. Turns out she had given her boyfriend a key to the apartment and he had let himself into my room when we were both gone. He stayed in my room for about five minutes, in which he used the time to go through my underwear drawer.” —Morgan, 20

10. “My drunk roommate had texted me demanding that I leave the room so he can have sex. Now, before my roommate had gone out that night, I had made it explicitly clear that I was studying and that I had an exam early the next morning, so I needed him not to be a drunk asshole so I could get some sleep. Nevertheless, he was very adamant and argued incessantly that he needed the room … An hour later, I come back and the door is locked. It is very late at this point, and I didn’t feel like putting up a fight, so I went to a friend’s room and slept on his couch. With my exam the next morning in less than six hours. The next day after my exam, I come back to find my roommate, who confirms that he did not have sex, and that he sexiled me to a friend’s couch the night before I had a big exam for absolutely nothing.” —Daniel, 21

11. “He would never clean the bathroom. No, in fact, he used to poop and then not flush. Now I don’t know what was more disturbing, the fact that he didn’t flush or the fact that I NEVER SAW ANY TOILER PAPER IN THERE. This gets worse. I decided to finally approach him about this one day because, quite frankly, I was tired of literally cleaning up his shit. So he awkwardly walks over to the bathroom with a piece of cardboard … and he would chop his poop into tinier pieces and then flush it. Gross. But still not the climax of this horror story. You see, he would leave the shit-covered cardboard in the bathroom next to the toilet and USE IT AGAIN LATER.” —Charles, 23 

Article source: http://www.cosmopolitan.com/college/a58508/roommate-horror-stories/

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My pet rats: ‘They are always happy to see me’

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 22, 2016 in Rat News
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What do my pet rats say about me?

“They say I’m caring. Rats are the ideal pet for me, as they fit around my life and are always happy to see me.”

And what they really say

In this aesthetic age of hipster kittens and cute cockapoos, when pets are ranked according to their Instagram-appropriateness, some of us feel that rats are not getting their due. Rats might not look sweet in a teacup or a knitted tutu, but they make great pets: they’re super-friendly, very clever and like to scrabble around in your jumper before popping up at your neck, like a wriggly scarf. I know this because, when I was 20, I had a pet rat. I called him Barney after the lead singer of New Order. Barney died in unfortunate circumstances (another story), but he was proper fun while he lasted.

Anyway. Donna is a rat breeder, a woman who understands rats. She is clearly happy to hold them, fine about them rootling in her hair (rats love walking over your head). I have no doubt she enjoys chasing them around the sofa. Donna has made nice big cages for her rats, but they’ll still need exercise. Rats like to look around, though they won’t run across rooms. They’ve been hunted for too long; they stick to the edges.

Rats are curious, and you can easily take one on a trip. You just hide it in your coat. I once took Barney to McDonald’s, but we were thrown out for being vermin (the cheek!). I didn’t mind: I could never get through a bag of chips without Barney swiping at least half of them. Rats are ultra-quick thieves, ninja nickers.

Judging by her clothes, Donna is not a goth (rats are a goth clubcard in animal form), so we can say her rats show that she is kind and caring, and that she looks beyond the obvious. She knows that appearances don’t matter as much as affection. She and her rats look happy, just as cute as can be.

If you would like Miranda to cast an eye over your favourite possession, email a photograph to magazine@observer.co.uk

Article source: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/may/22/my-pet-rats-are-always-happy-to-see-me

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Bankers’ bonus-style performance pay for GPs putting lives at risk, researchers warn

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 21, 2016 in Rat News
Closed

Bankers’ bonuses style performance pay for GPs could be putting patients’ lives at risk, research has warned.

The controversial “pay for performance” scheme, which was introduced under Tony Blair’s premiership, has been declared an “incredibly expensive experiment” which has failed. The scheme sees GPs receive financial rewards for meeting a variety of targets related to certain medical conditions.

An international study published by the Lancet medical journal has reviewed the scheme’s effects in comparison with 26 other countries and found that for the conditions within the scheme’s remit, no discernible benefits have been noted. Furthermore, for conditions for which GPs do not receive bonuses, death rates have actually increased slightly. These include pneumonia, osteoarthritis and hip fractures.

Katherine Murphy, Chief Executive of the Patients Association, told The Independent: “GPs need to focus on all their patients and not just those patients where they can measure or record data and get paid for it. 

Giving doctors bribes to focus on specific conditions is morally wrong and ethically wrong

Katherine Murphy, the Patients Association

“Giving doctors bribes to focus on specific conditions is morally wrong and ethically wrong. GPs must focus on patient care and outcomes- their priorities should not be compromised by financial incentives.”

The scheme was introduced in 2004 and saw GPs’ earnings rise by more than 25 per cent to £100,000 per annum on average. It is believed the scheme costs in the region of £1 billion per year.

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  • 2/22

    Multiple Sclerosis stem cell treatment ‘helps patients walk again’

    A new treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) has enabled some patients to walk again by “rebooting” their immune systems. As part of a clinical trial at Sheffield’s Royal Hallamshire Hospital involving around 20 patients, scientists used stem cells to carry out a bone marrow transplant. The method known as an autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) works by using chemotherapy to destroy the area of the immune system which causes MS

  • 3/22

    Dementia patients left without painkillers and handcuffed to bed

    Dementia patients experience a ‘shocking’ variation in the quality of hospital care they receive across England, a charity has warned. Staff using excessive force and not giving dementia patients the correct pain medication were among the findings outlined in a new report by The Alzheimer’s Society, to coincide with the launch of Fix Dementia Care campaign

  • 4/22

    Cancer risk ‘increased’ by drinking more than one glass of wine or pint of beer per day

    Drinking more than one glass of wine or pint of beer a day increases the risk of developing cancer, according to medical experts. New guidelines for alcohol consumption by the UK published by chief medical officers warn that drinking any level of alcohol has been linked to a range of different cancers. The evidence from the Committee on Carcinogenicity (COC) overturns the oft-held view that a glass of red wine can have significant medical benefits for both men and women

  • 5/22

    Vaping ‘no better’ than smoking regular cigarettes

    Vaping could be “no better” than smoking regular cigarettes and may be linked to cancer, scientists have found. The study which showed that vapour from e-cigarettes can damage or kill human cells was publsihed as the devices are to be rolled out by UK public health officials as an aid to quit smoking from 2016. An estimated 2.6 million people in the UK currently use e-cigarettes

  • 6/22

    Rat-bite fever

    A teenager was hospitalised and left unable to move after she developed the rare rat-bite fever disease from her pet rodents which lived in her bedroom. The teenager, who has not been named, was taken to hospital after she complained of a pain in her right hip and lower back which later made her immobile, according to the online medical journal BMJ Case Reports. She suffered for two weeks with an intermittent fever, nausea and vomiting and had a pink rash on her hands and feet. The teenager, who had numerous pets including a dog, cat, horse and three pet rats, has since made a full recovery after undergoing a course of antibiotics. Blood tests showed that she was infected with for streptobacillus moniliformis – the most common cause of rat-bite fever. One of her three pet rats lay dead in her room for three weeks before her symptoms showed

  • 7/22

    Taking antidepressants in pregnancy ‘could double the risk of autism in toddlers’

    Taking antidepressants during pregnancy could almost double the risk of a child being diagnosed with autism in the first years of life, a major study of nearly 150,000 pregnancies has suggested. Researchers have found a link between women in the later stages of pregnancy who were prescribed one of the most common types of antidepressant drugs, and autism diagnosed in children under seven years of age

  • 8/22

    Warning over Calpol

    Parents have been warned that giving children paracetamol-based medicines such as Calpol and Disprol too often could lead to serious health issues later in life. Leading paediatrician and professor of general paediatrics at University College London, Alastair Sutcliffe, said parents were overusing paracetamol to treat mild fevers. As a result, the risk of developing asthma, as well as kidney, heart and liver damage is heightened

  • 9/22

    Fat loss from pancreas ‘can reverse’ effects of type-2 diabetes

    Less than half a teaspoon of fat is all that it takes to turn someone into a type-2 diabetic according to a study that could overturn conventional wisdom on a disease affecting nearly 3 million people in Britain. Researchers have found it is not so much the overall body fat that is important in determining the onset of type-2 diabetes but the small amount of fat deposited in the pancreas, the endocrine organ responsible for insulin production

  • 10/22

    Potatoes reduce risk of stomach cancer

    Scientists have found people who eat large amounts of white vegetables were a third less likely to contract stomach cancer. The study, undertaken by Chinese scientists at Zhejiang University, found eating cauliflower, potatoes and onions reduces the chance of contracting stomach cancer but that beer, spirits, salt and preserved foods increased a person’s risk of the cancer

  • 11/22

    Connections between brain cells destroyed in early stages of Alzheimer’s disease

    Scientists have pinpointed how connections in the brain are destroyed in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, in a study which it is hoped will help in the development of treatments for the debilitating condition. At the early stages of the development of Alzheimer’s disease the synapses – which connect the neurons in the brain – are destroyed, according to researchers at the University of New South Wales, Australia. The synapses are vital for brain function, particularly learning and forming memories

  • 12/22

    Sugar tax

    The Government should introduce a sugar tax to prevent an “obesity crisis” from crippling the NHS, a senior Conservative MP and former health minister has said. Dr Dan Poulter believes that the case for increased taxes on unhealthy sugary products was “increasingly compelling”

    PA

  • 13/22

    Cancer breakthrough offers new hope for survivors rendered infertile by chemotherapy

    A potentially “phenomenal” scientific breakthrough has offered fresh hope to cancer patients rendered infertile by chemotherapy. For the first time, researchers managed to restore ovaries in mice affected by chemotherapy so that they were able to have offspring. The scientists now plan to begin clinical trials to see if the technique, which involves the use of stem cells, will also work in humans by using umbilical cord material and possibly stem cells taken from human embryos, if regulators agree

  • 14/22

    Take this NHS test to find out if you have a cancerous mole

    An interactive test could help flag up whether you should seek advice from a health professional for one of the most common types of cancer. The test is available on the NHS Choices website and reveals whether you are at risk from the disease and recommends if you should seek help. The mole self-assessment factors in elements such as complexion, the number of times you have been severely sunburnt and whether skin cancer runs in your family. It also quizzes you on the number of moles you have and whether there have been any changes in appearance regarding size, shape and colour

  • 15/22

    Health apps approved by NHS ‘may put users at risk of identity theft’

    Experts have warned that some apps do not adequately protect personal information

  • 16/22

    A watchdog has said that care visits must last longer

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) said home help visits of less than 30 minutes were not acceptable unless part of a wider package of support

  • 17/22

    Pendle in Lancashire tops list of five most anxious places to live in the UK

    Pendle in Lancashire has been named the most anxious place to live in the UK, while people living in Fermanagh and Omagh in Northern Ireland have been found to be the happiest

  • 18/22

    Ketamine could be used as anti-depressant

    Researchers at the University of Auckland said monitoring the effects of the drug on the brain has revealed neural pathways that could aid the development of fast-acting medications.
    Ketamine is a synthetic compound used as an off anaesthetic and analgesic drug, but is commonly used illegally as a hallucinogenic party drug.
    Dr Suresh Muthukumaraswamy, a senior researcher at the university and a member of the institution’s Centre for Brain Research, used the latest technology in brain imaging to investigate what mechanisms ketamine uses to be active in the human brain

  • 19/22

    A prosthetic hand that lets people actually feel through

    The technology lets paralysed people feel actual sensations when touching objects — including light taps on the mechanical finger — and could be a huge breakthrough for prosthetics, according to its makers. The tool was used to let a 28-year-old man who has been paralysed for more than a decade. While prosthetics have previously been able to be controlled directly from the brain, it is the first time that signals have been successfully sent the other way

  • 20/22

    The biggest cause of early death in the world is what you eat

    Unhealthy eating has been named as the most common cause of premature death around the globe, new data has revealed. A poor diet – which involves eating too few vegetables, fruits, nuts and grains and too much red meat, salt and sugar – was shown to be a bigger killer than smoking and alcohol

  • 21/22

    Scientists develop blood test that estimates how quickly people age

    Scientists believe it could be used to predict a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease as well as the “youthfulness” of donated organs for transplant operations. The test measures the vitality of certain genes which the researchers believe is an accurate indication of a person’s “biological age”, which may be younger or older than their actual chronological age

  • 22/22

    Aspirin could help boost therapies that fight cancer

    The latest therapies that fight cancer could work better when combined with aspirin, research has suggested. Scientists from the Francis Crick Institute in London say the anti-inflammatory pain killer suppresses a cancer molecule that allows tumours to evade the body’s immune defences.
    Laboratory tests have shown that skin, breast and bowel cancer cells often generate large amounts of this molecule, called prostaglandin E2 (PGE2).
    But Aspirin is one of a family of drugs that sends messages to the brain to block production of PGE2 and this means cancer cells can be attacked by the body’s natural defences

A spokesperson for the Department for Health said: “We recognise GPs are under a lot of pressure and have already revised the Qualities and Outcome Framework (QOF) to remove 10 minute minimum slots for booked appointments, as well as reducing unnecessary paperwork for GPs so that they can spend more time with patients.

“NHS England has agreed to undertake a review of QOF in the coming year, to see how we can best manage the system for the future.”

  • More about:
  • Health
  • Medicine
  • NHS
  • doctors
  • GP
  • Labour
  • Tony Blair
  • Science
  • Research

Article source: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/bankers-bonus-style-performance-pay-for-gps-putting-lives-at-risk-researchers-warn-a7035371.html

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Liam Fee murder trial: Mother ‘completely failed’ toddler

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 20, 2016 in Rat News
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Rachel and Nyomi Fee deny murdering Liam

Image caption

Rachel and Nyomi Fee deny murdering Liam

A mother accused of murdering her two-year-old son has told a jury she completely failed her son.

Rachel Fee is on trial alongside her civil partner Nyomi Fee, accused of killing toddler Liam in March 2014.

Ms Fee told a jury she was not thinking rationally when she failed to get Liam help for a broken leg he had suffered the week before he died.

The couple blame that injury, and Liam’s death, on another boy.

Rachel Fee said she feared Liam would be taken off her if she had taken him to hospital, admitting the toddler would still be alive if she had sought help for him.

‘Really bad’

Nyomi Fee, 28, and Rachel Fee, 31, deny killing the two-year-old at a house near Glenrothes in Fife on 22 March 2014, by repeatedly inflicting “blunt force trauma” to his head and body.

They also face charges they neglected Liam and abused two other children.

The pair blame one of the other children in their care for killing Liam.

The women, who are both originally from Ryton, Tyne and Wear, deny all the charges against them.

Image caption

Liam Fee was found dead at a house near Glenrothes in Fife on 22 March 2014

Giving evidence in her own defence, Rachel Fee said she would regret for the rest of her life her decision not to get emergency medical help for her two-year-old son’s broken leg.

Under cross examination, the 31-year-old admitted that she had even threatened to leave her co-accused Nyomi Fee if she called an ambulance for the toddler.

Advocate depute Alex Prentice, prosecuting, suggested she had put her own interests before those of her child.

He asked her: “How does that square with rights, duties and responsibilities of a mother you told us about earlier?”

She answered: “I completely failed Liam.”

Mr Prentice told her that little Liam must have been in “excruciating pain” with a broken thigh bone.

Earlier, Ms Fee admitted that she repeatedly searched Google to find out if a broken bone could cause death and if married lesbians could share a cell if they were jailed for neglect.

She told the court she felt “really bad” that she had spent about three hours on the day Liam died at riding stables looking after her horse.

She came home at about 18:20 to have drinks and a takeaway meal with Nyomi.

Rachel Fee told how she heard Nyomi shouting her name repeatedly from Liam’s bedroom and ran in to see her son “all white” being lifted out of his buggy by her partner.

‘Completely distraught’

Her defence QC Brian McConnachie asked her: “Can you remember how you reacted?” she said: “Yes. I think I fell to the floor. He wasn’t breathing.”

She said she went to the hallway where the other child was and he put his head down.

She said: “I knew by the look on his face he’d done something. Just done something.

“I was feeing completely distraught, devastated. I didn’t know what was happening, didn’t know what to do – so many different emotions.”

She said she was aware that her son was not breathing and asked the older child what he had done.

Ms Fee told the court: “I said: ‘You’ve strangled him or suffocated him haven’t you?’ and he said: ‘Yes’.”

Rachel Fee denied the prosecution’s claim that she and Nyomi had delayed calling the ambulance to allow them to hide a makeshift cage in which they allegedly imprisoned one of two older children they were looking after.

She told the jury that the boy she accused of strangling Liam had been responsible for sexually assaulting the toddler, giving him a head injury and breaking his leg.

She claimed she did nothing about the alleged assaults because she was scared social services would take the children away from her.

Ms Fee also denied the allegations from the other children of abuse spanning a two-year period.

She denied forcing them to take cold showers as punishment for wetting the bed, tying one in a cage and tying the other to a chair at night in a room full of pet rats and snakes.

The trial at the High Court in Livingston continues.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-36342256

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Root For The Boston Red Sox This Year

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 19, 2016 in Rat News
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Photo: AP

This is part of an occasional series of slightly belated MLB season previews.

There’s an old chestnut about Red Sox pitcher Clay Buchholz. An acclaimed sprinter in high school, Buchholz was rumored to be fast. He wasn’t just supposed to be fast for a pitcher, though. Buchholz was allegedly as fast, if not faster, than speedster OF Jacoby Ellsbury.

In 2008, Buchholz talked about how he wasn’t allowed to footrace Ellsbury while he was at a Florida sports facility in the offseason. “I’ve already been told that I’ll be fined if I race against Ellsbury,” he told Gordon Edes. Then, in 2014, Edes spoke to Clay’s father, Skip. While a player’s father is a dubious source , Skip thought his son would win handily:

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“Beat [Jacoby] Ellsbury in a race? Ellsbury couldn’t sniff him, man. He could run a 4.25 40 in football. I’d see him on the bases when a ball was hit into the gap, when he hit second he was in another gear.”

If Buchholz’s reputation is accurate, maybe the Red Sox should try utilizing him as a pinch-runner, because he sure as shit can’t pitch anymore. In eight starts, Buchholz has a 6.11 ERA and 1.47 WHIP. He’s allowed 1.6 homers and 3.9 walks per nine innings. Also, with his haircut, he makes Jeff Samardzija look simply adorable, like one of those fancy pet rats:




Photo: AP

Though I have good reason for it, I’ve been a fervent defender of Buchholz’s. He was useful in the postseason. At some point, he’ll pile up a few good starts, but this time, unlike all those times in the past, I will not fall into that trap and think, “Clay’s got it again.” Buchholz could string together 13 quality starts and I know, I just know that once I start believing in him, he’s going to get shelled for seven runs over three innings in his next one.

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As bad as Buchholz gets, the Red Sox will keep him in the rotation anyway, because it’s embarrassing to switch the originally projected No. 2 guy to the bullpen in the middle of the season, and because they don’t really have anyone better.

Who are the Red Sox?

The Red Sox have an insane offense and dreadful pitching. They lead MLB in runs, slugging percentage, and OPS. They’re third in on-base percentage. The club has a +57 run differential, which is surprising considering the quality of the rotation.

What guys should you know?

Jackie Bradley Jr. struggled when he was first called up in 2013, but everything seems to be coming together for him this season. He currently has a 24-game hitting streak, mostly out of the nine spot, and he’s fun to watch in the outfield.

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David Ortiz, who’s retiring at the end of the season, is a guy you most definitely know. What you might not know is that he’s having an unprecedented season for a 40-year-old:




Source: Baseball Reference

Eat shit, Lave Cross!

Papi’s had an incredible start to the season, but if you don’t like him, you can make fun of all the stupid gifts he gets from other teams for his swan song.

Other Red Sox who are fun and have good baseball names: Mookie Betts, Brock Holt, and Travis Shaw. And if you’re a fan of knuckleballers, Steven Wright’s your guy. He’s much better than Clay Buchholz. Just ignore Ryan Hanigan’s struggles to catch all the strike threes:

One GIF of a Red Sox fan




Old, but timeless.

Can they beat the Cardinals?

The Red Sox beat their asses twice for World Series titles.

Who has the best baseball chin?

Jackie Bradley Jr. has a fine chin, and it looks better when isolated by water:




Photo: AP

So are they going to be good?

If the Red Sox can continue to score double-digit runs in every game, I am confident that they will win the World Series. Barring that, I have no clue. They’re neck-and-neck with the Orioles at the top of the AL East, but it’s a matter of Boston’s rotation getting it together. The season’s long, and they can’t keep bleeding runs. Newly signed free agent David Price’s 5.53 ERA is ugly, but we’re in May, and he’s striking guys out, so I don’t want to jump to any conclusions yet.

Why should you root for the Red Sox?

You won’t, because the Red Sox are easy to hate. But they have a bunch of fun, young players who aren’t the previous teams’ perpetually sweaty, wound-up hardasses like Kevin Youkilis, John Lackey, and Jonathan Papelbon. (Once Ortiz is gone, Dustin Pedroia will be the last remnant of that era.) If you hate pitching duels, they have a lights-out offense, which makes every game fun, until Clay Buchholz takes the mound again.

Article source: http://deadspin.com/root-for-the-boston-red-sox-this-year-1770645048

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