It’s just animal magnetism

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 20, 2014 in Rat News
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MANY animal lovers might think the idea of surrounding themselves with furry, feathered, or finned friends on a day-to-day basis would be heaven.

THE HEALING GAME: Dedicated wildlife carer Donna Anthony with CC. Her voluntary work is virtually a full-time job.

MANY animal lovers might think the idea of surrounding themselves with furry, feathered, or finned friends on a day-to-day basis would be heaven.

But what exactly motivates those few who choose to dedicate their entire home and working lives to protecting and caring for creatures, great and small?

Whether they are tending to pets, farm animals, or native wildlife, a number of Coast locals are bringing their passion for helping animals into their daily lives.

Yandina resident Donna Anthony has cared and rehabilitated wild animals for nearly a decade.

Before joining the Sunshine Coast’s Wildlife Volunteers Association in 1995, Donna lived up north where she looked after indigenous animals in a tourist nature park outside Cairns for several years.

“I guess why I do this is because I’ve always appreciated the wildlife, and the challenges that our wildlife are facing because of development,” Donna said.

“When I moved down here, I wanted to continue looking after animals with a local wildlife organisation.

“So I picked up the phonebook and found WILVOS, and I’ve been with them ever since.”

While her position as WILVOS vice-chairperson is purely volunteer, the 61-year-old retiree said the number of hours she dedicated to wildlife care could easily rival a full-time job.

“You start off with allocating time caring for the animals that are brought in. Then there are admin tasks that need to be done, teaching other members about wildlife care, and before you know it, you’re doing 18 hours a day, seven days a week,” Donna said.

Donna is one of 130 WILVOS carers who take in injured or distressed wildlife before rehabilitating the animals back into their natural habitats across the Coast.

At home, Donna has been known to look after animals needing around-the-clock care such as macropods, possums, gliders, and echidnas.

“That’s the part I love doing: the other parts are a chore,” Donna laughed. “I absolutely love it. It just gives you a real purpose and direction, and you see the need for (wildlife care) more and more.

“Most of the animals that come in for care were the result of human impact, whether it’s motorbike accidents, their habitats being demolished, or being attacked by people’s cats and dogs.

“There’s a duty of care. We’ve been responsible for what has happened to them, so the least we could do is to help them.”

Twenty-three-year-old university student Elizabeth Harris is also willing to take a more hands-on approach to animals, with her love of “anything cute and cuddly” as a child eventually steering her towards her dream of working as a vet.

The Tanawha resident recently made the move to switch from studying a Bachelor of Environmental Science to Veterinary Science at the University of Queensland, starting next semester.

Having grown up in an animal-loving family, Elizabeth believed caring for other critters was always second nature to her.

“My family’s always loved animals,” Elizabeth said.

“Ever since I was a toddler, I remember us making those trips to refuges every now and then just so we could bring home a pet that needed a real home.

“We ended up having about four dogs, two cats, a few pet rats and even a galah at the one time.

“I know Dad didn’t want us having so many animals in the end, but we loved sharing a happy house with some new family members.”

Elizabeth recalled always wanting to help animals as a profession back from when she was in primary school, with the hope of one day becoming a zookeeper, or working with the RSPCA.

But after her first year at university, Elizabeth decided to revive her childhood dream and enrol into UQ’s School of Veterinary Science.

“I always had that dream of helping animals when I grew up, and I’m excited I can finally do it as a future vet,” Elizabeth said.

“Just the chance to get up close with animals, getting to know them, and nursing them back to health … well, that’s probably one of the most important things humans can do.”

Animal rights campaigner and Vegan Warriors founder Jaylene Musgrave believes her love for animals and her outspokenness against animal cruelty stemmed from a young age when she first realised the harsh realities of livestock slaughter.

“I grew up in Kilcoy, minutes away from the slaughterhouse where my father was a meat inspector,” Jaylene said.

“Each day, I started to realise the connection between the abattoir and what my beautiful mum would serve us each night at tea.”

Nearly three decades on and Jaylene has since embraced the environmentally-minded lifestyle of a vegan and avid animal rights activist.

For years, Jaylene has stood by many animal rights campaigns, including the protection of Fraser Island dingoes and the Coast’s kangaroo population, and demonstrating against bull-riding, land clearing and factory-farming practices.

“If not for those of us that are seen as different and difficult, then who will help give a voice to the voiceless?” Jaylene asked.

“To look any animal in the eyes and know that I am doing as much as I can to help them is spiritually fulfilling … to live a life with true meaning.”

Following a vibrant career in the music industry as a publicist to some of the biggest names in Australian music, Jaylene created unfunded animal rights group Vegan Warriors in 2006.

She said her motivation had been to give poorly treated animals a voice.

Founding Vegan Warriors also went hand-in-hand with Jaylene’s ultimate choice to turn vegan.

She believed adopting a vegan diet meant she could play her own small part in ensuring betterment of animals and the environment.

“To live a life as a vegan is to live a life where a heavy burden is lifted off your shoulders,” Jaylene said.

“One where I very proudly say, ‘I love animals’ and know how authentically I live my life.”

Hollywood’s animal lovers Betty White – This Golden Girl has been a proud animal lover and pet owner for decades, having also sat on the board of directors for the Morris Animal Foundation for more than 25 years, and is currently a board member for the non-profit organisation Actors and Others for Animals.

Paul McCartney – The former Beatle is a strong advocate of animal rights and vegetarianism with his late wife Linda McCartney and former wife Heather Mills. He was once quoted to say in a PETA video, “If slaughterhouses had glass walls, everyone would be vegetarian.”

Charlize Theron – The Oscar-winning actor is not only a brand ambassador for Best Friends Animal Society, but is also an active member of PETA, having posed for PETA’s anti-fur campaign adverts and narrated a documentary on PETA’s undercover investigation on puppy mills.

Brigitte Bardot – After filming more than 40 movies, French actress Brigitte Bardot chose to dedicate her life and fame to promoting animal rights and establishing the Brigitte Bardot Foundation for the Welfare and Protection of Animals, which works directly with animal refuges and rescues.

Read more lifestyle stories.

Article source: http://www.qt.com.au/story/2012/04/25/just-where-do-they-get-this-animal-magnetism/

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Mediso présente le nouvel outil d'examen MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 19, 2014 in Rat Answers
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MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT, the first member of MultiScan product line
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GÖTEBORG, Suède, October 17, 2014 /PRNewswire/ –

Mediso annonce le MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT, le premier produit de la gamme MultiScan dédiée aux applications d’examen d’imagerie clinique et préclinique. Avec un champ de vision axial de 20 cm et transaxial de 15 cm, une résolution TEP inférieure au millimètre et une sensibilité de 5 %, le LFER 150, un équipement haute résolution à large champ de vision (Large Field of view Extreme Resolution, LFER), est destiné à l’examen cérébral préclinique.

     (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20141017/712245-a )
     (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20141017/712245-b )

Grâce à la table d’examen patient amovible et à l’espace mort quasi inexistant en avant du champ de vision, cette application est facilitée et très accessible. La tête d’imagerie compacte peut être manipulée avec une grande liberté, et la configuration unique du détecteur permet l’acquisition consécutive d’images de tomographie par émission de positons (TEP) et d’images de tomodensitométrie (TDM) sans avoir à déplacer le patient.

La table d’examen fixable MobilCell permet d’effectuer des examens de TDM hélicoïdale et d’imagerie TEP à plusieurs positions de lit avec un champ de vision axial pouvant atteindre 60 cm. Pour renforcer l’utilité du système, celui-ci est compatible avec la gamme de chambres d’imagerie MultiCell, qui peuvent accueillir, individuellement ou collectivement, des rats, des souris, des lapins ou des ouistitis. De plus, il comprend des fonctions de contrôle de la température et de surveillance de la respiration et de l’électrocardiogramme (ECG).

Istvan Bagamery, propriétaire et PDG de Mediso explique : « Lors de la conception du MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT, nous pensions aux tâches de neuro-imagerie les plus difficiles, comme des expériences cérébrales avec stimulus visuel sur des singes assis éveillés. Des études sur différentes espèces, des souris jusqu’aux cochons nains, sont également possibles. Nous sommes très fiers de la première installation du système au sein du laboratoire du Dr Hirotaka Onoe, au RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies au Japon, présidé par le Professeur Yasuyoshi Watanabe. Notre nouveau système est idéal pour prendre en charge la variété des activités d’examen qui y sont menées. »

« La nouvelle gamme de produits MultiScan comportera également des appareils de tomographie d’examen clinique dédiés, le prochain développement étant un tomographe cérébral clinique. »

À propos de Mediso Ltd. :  

La société Mediso a été fondée en 1990 par des experts de la Recherche et du développement (RD) et de la production de produits d’imagerie nucléaire multimodale. Elle propose actuellement quatre modalités (tomographie d’émission monophotonique [TEMP], TEP, TDM, imagerie par résonance magnétique [IRM]) et est le premier fournisseur de technologies d’imagerie préclinique dans le monde. Ses innovations précédentes incluent le nanoScan PM, le premier système TEP/RM préclinique intégré, qui représente déjà quinze installations. Les produits cliniques et précliniques de Mediso sont vendus dans le monde entier, en direct et par l’intermédiaire d’un réseau de distributeurs, et comptent plus de 1 250 systèmes d’imagerie en activité dans plus de 90 pays du monde.

Pour plus d’informations, consultez le site web de Mediso : http://www.mediso.com.

Contact : Marton Halmai, +36-1-399-30-30

SOURCE Mediso Medical Imaging Systems



Article source: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mediso-presente-le-nouvel-outil-dexamen-multiscan-lfer-150-petct-279593522.html

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Saskatoon couple says they will move if city doesn’t let them keep pet raccoon

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 19, 2014 in Rat Answers
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A Saskatoon woman and her pet raccoon have fled the city to escape municipal bylaws that outlaw ownership of the mischievous, bandit-faced animals.

Wendy Hook, who moved to Saskatoon with her husband this spring, said she was trying to be a law-abiding citizen when she went to City Hall last week to get an exotic pet license for her beloved raccoon, Dennis. When she was told it was illegal to keep Dennis in her house, she “panicked” and moved in with friends outside city limits to avoid the possibility of bylaw enforcement officers taking her pet away.

“I’m willing to stay away with Dennis as long as I have to, to hopefully get the city to turn around on this. If they won’t, we really don’t have any other option but to move,” Hook said Thursday from her City Park apartment, where she had brought Dennis for a visit.

Provincial legislation allows Saskatchewan residents to keep raccoons as pets, but raccoon ownership is forbidden within Saskatoon city limits because the ring-tailed mammals are classified as “prohibited” under the municipal animal control bylaw.

Hook said she hopes the city makes an exception for Dennis and is exploring the possibility of getting him involved in an educational program, which she believes could make him eligible for a special permit.

RICHARD MARJAN/STARPHOENIX

If the city won’t budge, Hook said she and her husband are prepared to abandon city life to remain united with their 30-pound raccoon, who could live for up to 20 years.

“We would do whatever we needed to do to make life easier for Dennis,” she said.

Dennis came into Hook’s life 17 months ago, when she and her husband were living in southeastern Saskatchewan. Her landlord at the time had discovered two baby raccoons on the floor of her barn, and asked Hook if she wanted them.

“Well, of course I did,” Hook recalled.

One of the raccoons died within a few hours, but Dennis “just kept growing and growing and growing,” she said.

It was like having a baby — Dennis needed to be fed with an eye dropper every couple of hours for the first few months, and Hook eventually weaned him onto a baby bottle. As he grew older, she trained him to use a litter box and respond to his name.

“He is like nothing we’ve ever had,” Hook said. “He’s a little bit of canine behaviour, a little bit of feline. He’s just as happy to have a chew toy as he is a feather.”

A self-professed animal lover who’s previously had dogs, cats, gerbils, rats and snakes, Hook said Dennis has been more like a companion than any of her previous pets.

“He will sit on my lap and I will talk to him, and I talk to him a lot. I’ve never had an animal that paid attention. He will make eye contact and he will keep it,” she said. “When either one of us are sick and in bed, he will come and he will just lay with us and cuddle. It’s like he knows when we’re not feeling well or when you’re sad or you’re frustrated. He’ll come and give you a little lick.”

RICHARD MARJAN/STARPHOENIX

Dennis sleeps on Hook’s bed, eats from her hands and likes pulling items out of her pockets. He eats dry dog food, wears a collar and likes going for walks, though he often shuffles between Hook’s feet. She said Dennis will nip affectionately when he’s hungry or tired, but is never aggressive.

“He’s so not what you would expect,” she said. “Most people imagine a snarling little ball of fur that will wreck your house in a heartbeat, whereas this little guy, the last place that we lived we got 100 per cent of our damage deposit back. He’s awesome.”

Hook said Dennis is fully vaccinated and better behaved than many pets she’s encountered. She also said he’s a big hit with almost everyone who meets him.

“Dennis has stopped traffic. People have literally stopped their cars and taken pictures,” she said with a laugh.

RICHARD MARJAN/STARPHOENIX

John Moran, manager of the Saskatoon Forestry Farm Park and Zoo, said if bylaw enforcement officers spot an illegal pet or receive complaints about one, the owner could be required to surrender it to an animal control agency. He added that raccoons can transmit diseases and parasites to humans and that, quite frankly, “wild animals don’t make good pets.”

Hook adamantly disagrees.

“The thrill hasn’t worn off for me yet. Every day that we get up, we’re still amazed that we have a raccoon, we have a raccoon for a pet,” she said. “I’ve never had such an affectionate pet before.”

Article source: http://news.nationalpost.com/2014/10/17/saskatoon-couple-says-they-will-move-if-city-doesnt-let-them-keep-pet-raccoon/

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Saskatchewan couple fights to keep pet raccoon | video

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 18, 2014 in Rat Answers
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A Saskatoon woman and her pet raccoon have fled the city to escape municipal bylaws that outlaw ownership of the mischievous, bandit-faced animals.

Wendy Hook, who moved to Saskatoon with her husband this spring, said she was trying to be a law-abiding citizen when she went to City Hall last week to get an exotic pet license for her beloved raccoon, Dennis. When she was told it was illegal to keep Dennis in her house, she “panicked� and moved in with friends outside city limits to avoid the possibility of bylaw enforcement officers taking her pet away.

“I’m willing to stay away with Dennis as long as I have to, to hopefully get the city to turn around on this. If they won’t, we really don’t have any other option but to move,� Hook said Thursday from her City Park apartment, where she had brought Dennis for a visit.

Provincial legislation allows Saskatchewan residents to keep raccoons as pets, but raccoon ownership is forbidden within Saskatoon city limits because the ring-tailed mammals are classified as “prohibited� under the municipal animal control bylaw.

Hook said she hopes the city makes an exception for Dennis and is exploring the possibility of getting him involved in an educational program, which she believes could make him eligible for a special permit.

If the city won’t budge, Hook said she and her husband are prepared to abandon city life to remain united with their 30-pound raccoon, who could live for up to 20 years.

“We would do whatever we needed to do to make life easier for Dennis,� she said.

Dennis came into Hook’s life 17 months ago, when she and her husband were living in southeastern Saskatchewan. Her landlord at the time had discovered two baby raccoons on the floor of her barn, and asked Hook if she wanted them.

“Well, of course I did,� Hook recalled.

One of the raccoons died within a few hours, but Dennis “just kept growing and growing and growing,� she said.

It was like having a baby — Dennis needed to be fed with an eye dropper every couple of hours for the first few months, and Hook eventually weaned him onto a baby bottle. As he grew older, she trained him to use a litter box and respond to his name.

“He is like nothing we’ve ever had,� Hook said. “He’s a little bit of canine behaviour, a little bit of feline. He’s just as happy to have a chew toy as he is a feather.�

A self-professed animal lover who’s previously had dogs, cats, gerbils, rats and snakes, Hook said Dennis has been more like a companion than any of her previous pets.

“He will sit on my lap and I will talk to him, and I talk to him a lot. I’ve never had an animal that paid attention. He will make eye contact and he will keep it,� she said. “When either one of us are sick and in bed, he will come and he will just lay with us and cuddle. It’s like he knows when we’re not feeling well or when you’re sad or you’re frustrated. He’ll come and give you a little lick.�

Dennis sleeps on Hook’s bed, eats from her hands and likes pulling items out of her pockets. He eats dry dog food, wears a collar and likes going for walks, though he often shuffles between Hook’s feet. She said Dennis will nip affectionately when he’s hungry or tired, but is never aggressive.

Article source: http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/saskatoon/Couple+fights+keep+raccoon/10296591/story.html

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Area Business Leaders Help Habitat for Humanity

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 18, 2014 in Rat News
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DES MOINES, Iowa — Leaders from several metro businesses teamed up to fulfill one main goal Tuesday.

Chris Welp of Athene USA in West Des Moines is among those participating in the CEO Habitat for Humanity build.

“I think most of us enjoy swinging a hammer instead of swinging a pencil sometimes so we do enjoy the change of pace,” says Welp.

Eventually, a mother and her five growing boys will move into the home at 1570 East Emma Avenue in Des Moines.

Tuesday, volunteers spent the morning putting up the pre-assembled walls and doing some plumbing.

“We are fortunate Des Moines has a great community of leaders that come together to find solutions and solve problems and they do that here with housing and Greater Des Moines Habitat for Humanity and putting a little sweat and muscle into it to help be able to make a difference,” says Lance Henning with Habitat for Humanity.

The house the CEOs are working on is just one of four houses going up in the area.

Article source: http://whotv.com/2014/09/16/area-business-leaders-help-habitat-for-humanity/

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"Hoarders" Season 3 Finale: Glen and Lisa, Rats and Cats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 18, 2014 in Rat News
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What a difference the removal of a few thousand pet
rats can make, right? On this week’s episode of Hoarders, the season 3
finale, we were introduced to Glen and Lisa and their issues with rats
and cats. And it wasn’t pretty.

Glen seems like a pretty cool
guy, stuck in a state of sadness since the death of his wife. He’s got a
sort of Jeff Bridges meets Richie Tenenbaum thing going on (see picture
below), and I dig it. As cool as this guy is, he’s had a tough few
years since he unexpectedly found his wife dead of a heart attack in her
mid-thirties in 1989. Tough stuff. To help deal with the pain and fill a
void in his life, Glen got himself three pet rats two years ago. And
that’s where our story begins.

Glen’s three pet rats were,
unfortunately, not three boys, so as soon as they got the chance they
reproduced. Zoom forward to now, and Glenn has a house full of at least a
thousand rats. His rats have taken over every inch of the house,
burrowing in walls, invading mattresses, nesting in recliners,
everything. It’s gotten so bad that Glen has moved out from the house
and basically lives in his garage/office. Glen gives a pretty creepy
crawly explanation for this move, describing the way the rats would pull
on his hair and lick his lips and nose when he tried to sleep. Shiver.

Poor
Glen loves these rats like they’re children, but realizes the situation
is no longer safe or healthy for him or the rats (they are getting
territorial and mean in such tight quarters). In comes Dr. Robin. Major
props to her for walking right into that house and facing the swarming
floor of rats without even batting an eyelash. Actually, that goes for
the whole AE production team, because I would’ve lost it in there.

Like
I said before, Glen’s a cool dude and he was really on board with the
whole process of removing the rats, even though he was visibly emotional
throughout the process and was really attached to these pets. A team of
rescuers from The Humane Society did an awesome job humanely catching
and containing as many rats as they could, boxing them up for rescue and
adoption. Unfortunately, there were a few that were really sick or
injured, but Glen stepped up and gave the okay to have them put down. 

The
rat searchers had quite a task ahead of them and had to tear up walls,
the bathtub and pretty much get into every nook and cranny of the house
to get the rats out. In the end, they rescued at least 2,000 rats, and,
as we learned in the update, Glen found another 350 after they left,
which he adopted out. Glen did get to keep one special rat, Commander
Whitehead, which he luckily was able to find during the initial search
efforts. Commander Whitehead got a clean bill of health (surprise, Glen,
he’s a girl!), and I imagine will go on to lead and long and lovely
life as Glen’s one and only pet.

Glen gave his final goodbyes to
all of the rats and they went off to find new homes with nice families.
In fact, if you are a nice family and are in need of a pet rat, you can
learn how to adopt one of Glen’s rats here. Good luck to you Glen, I think you’ve got better times ahead.

Glen.jpg

Article source: http://www.chicagonow.com/blogs/reality-zen-with-jenn/2011/01/hoarders-season-3-finale-glen-and-lisa-rats-and-cats.html

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Mediso launches MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT for research applications

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 18, 2014 in Rat Answers
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Mediso Medical Imaging Systems

Article source: http://www.news-medical.net/news/20141017/Mediso-launches-MultiScan-LFER-150-PETCT-for-research-applications.aspx

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Mediso Unveils the New MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT Research Tool

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 17, 2014 in Rat Answers
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GOTHENBURG, Sweden, October 17, 2014 /PRNewswire/ –

Mediso announces the MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT, the first member of the MultiScan product line dedicated to research applications for both clinical and pre-clinical imaging. The LFER 150 (Large Field of view Extreme Resolution) with 20 cm axial and 15 cm transaxial field of view (FOV), sub-mm PET resolution and 5% sensitivity is aimed at pre-clinical brain research.

     (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20141017/712245-a )
     (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20141017/712245-b )

The above application is facilitated by the detachable patient table and virtually no dead space in front of the FOV, making it highly accessible. The compact imaging head can be manipulated with a high degree of freedom and the detectors’ unique configuration enables consecutive PET and CT acquisition without moving the subject.

The dockable MobilCell examination table allows helical CT studies and multiple bed position PET imaging of up to 60 cm axial FOV. To further increase the utility of the system, it is compatible with the MultiCell range of imaging chambers for single and multiple rats and mice, rabbits and marmosets and includes temperature control and respiratory and ECG monitoring.

Istvan Bagamery, owner and CEO of Mediso tells:  “While designing the MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT we had the most challenging neuroimaging tasks in mind, like brain experiments with visual stimulus on awake sitting monkeys. Studies on various species from mouse to mini-pig are also supported. We are very proud at the first installation of the system in the laboratory of Dr Hirotaka Onoe, at the Japanese RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, presided by Prof. Yasuyoshi Watanabe. Our new system is a perfect match to the broad range of research activities going on there.”

“The new MultiScan product range will also consist of dedicated clinical research scanners, the next development being a clinical brain scanner.”

About Mediso Ltd.: 

Mediso was founded in 1990 by experts in RD and manufacturing of multimodal nuclear imaging. Currently it offers four modalities – SPECT, PET, CT, MRI – and is the leading provider of preclinical imaging technology around the world. Its past innovations include nanoScan PM, the first commercial integrated preclinical PET/MR system with already 15 installations. Mediso’s clinical and preclinical products are sold worldwide directly and through a network of distributors, with over 1250 imaging systems operating in more than 90 countries around the globe.

For more information, please visit the Mediso web site at http://www.mediso.com.

Contact: Marton Halmai, +36-1-399-30-30

Article source: http://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/mediso-unveils-multiscan-lfer-150-060000349.html

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Smith: Why the quilt lady took them back

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 17, 2014 in Rat News
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Article source: http://www.pressdemocrat.com/home/2799522-181/smith-why-the-quilt-lady

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Two accused of growing marijuana

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Oct 16, 2014 in Rat News
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TOWN OF TURTLE—Sheriff’s deputies reported seizing 81 marijuana plants growing in the basement of a town of Turtle house last week, according to a criminal complaint.

The Rock County Sheriff’s Office Special Investigation Unit arrested two people in a raid on the house Wednesday, according to the complaint.

Blaine E. Wheaton, 45, and Susan E. Anderson, 30, both of 8823 S. Creek Road, were charged in Rock County Court on Friday.

Wheaton was charged with manufacture of marijuana and maintaining a drug trafficking place, both as a second or subsequent offense.

Anderson was charged with manufacture of marijuana, second or subsequent offense, and party to maintaining a drug trafficking place, second or subsequent offense.

“I just gave Blaine somewhere to grow pot,” and he had done so at the house for about a year, Anderson is alleged to have told deputies.

Wheaton brought in the grow equipment, which he had from a previous operation and which was not seized when he was arrested previously, Anderson said, according to the complaint.

Deputies became suspicious of the house after people were noticed making short visits there, and after marijuana stems and drug paraphernalia were found in the trash, the complaint states.

Deputies executed a search warrant at the residence at 10 a.m. Wednesday and discovered the grow operation, including 14 plants that were 6 inches to 18 inches high, 67 smaller plants, about 1.8 pounds of marijuana and grow lights controlled by timers, the complaint states.

Another woman told deputies that she, her husband and their three children lived in the house as guests of Anderson’s.

Deputies called Rock County Child Protective Services after discovering “nearly unlivable conditions” in the house, which included trash in bathrooms, moldy food on the counter and in the refrigerator and used diapers in cabinet drawers.

Two dogs, a cat and two pet rats, one of which was running loose, also lived in the house, the complaint states.

Wheaton and Anderson were released on signature bonds.

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Article source: http://www.gazettextra.com/20140609/two_accused_of_growing_marijuana_in_town_of_turtle

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