Rat Cafe to serve up rattuccinos with friendly rodents

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 25, 2017 in Rat News
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Hang out with this little Ratter McRattersons.


The San Francisco Dungeon

Cat cafes are an adorable worldwide trend that let people chill out with cute, often adoptable felines and have some coffee and a snack. There is even an owl cafe in Japan. The San Francisco Dungeon, a California tourist attraction, decided to open a pop-up themed cafe with animals that are a little more divisive: rats.

So far, the Rat Cafe pop-up experience is set for July 1 and July 8, with tickets starting at $49.99 (£39, AU$67). The price includes entry to the San Francisco Dungeon’s immersive theme-park-style history exhibits. It also covers all-you-can-drink coffee, just in case you need to make yourself a little more jumpy around a mischief of rats.

A chalkboard menu in a promotional photo mentions these punny items: rattuccino, ratte, car-rat cake and ratatouille on special. The Dungeon specifies that your furry companions will be “friendly.”

In case you’re waffling about having brunch with rodents, the Humane Society of the United States says that pet rats are “highly intelligent and social animals who clean themselves regularly and thrive on regular interaction.” That sounds better than a lot of humans you might have coffee with.

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Article source: https://www.cnet.com/news/rat-cafe-san-francisco-dungeon-pop-up/

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Rat Cafe to serve up rattuccinos with friendly rodents – CNET

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 24, 2017 in Rat News
Closed
ratcafe.jpgEnlarge Image

Hang out with this little Ratter McRattersons.


The San Francisco Dungeon

Cat cafes are an adorable worldwide trend that let people chill out with cute, often adoptable felines and have some coffee and a snack. There is even an owl cafe in Japan. The San Francisco Dungeon, a California tourist attraction, decided to open a pop-up themed cafe with animals that are a little more divisive: rats.

So far, the Rat Cafe pop-up experience is set for July 1 and July 8, with tickets starting at $49.99 (£39, AU$67). The price includes entry to the San Francisco Dungeon’s immersive theme-park-style history exhibits. It also covers all-you-can-drink coffee, just in case you need to make yourself a little more jumpy around a mischief of rats.

A chalkboard menu in a promotional photo mentions these punny items: rattuccino, ratte, car-rat cake and ratatouille on special. The Dungeon specifies that your furry companions will be “friendly.”

In case you’re waffling about having brunch with rodents, the Humane Society of the United States says that pet rats are “highly intelligent and social animals who clean themselves regularly and thrive on regular interaction.” That sounds better than a lot of humans you might have coffee with.

squirrel.jpg

Logging Out: Welcome to the crossroads of online life and the afterlife.

CNET en Español: Get all your tech news and reviews in Spanish.

Article source: https://www.cnet.com/news/rat-cafe-san-francisco-dungeon-pop-up/

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San Francisco: Rat Cafe Available This Summer For $50 | Money

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 23, 2017 in Rat News
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Article source: http://time.com/money/4787686/rat-cafe-san-francisco-dungeon/

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At This Café You Can Pay $50 to Drink Coffee Surrounded By Rats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 22, 2017 in Rat News
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A pop-up café that is purposely filled with rats (purposely filled with rats!!!!) is about to open, and you can go there if you’d like rodents to crawl on your toes over nice conversation with your friends. ~*DaTe NiGhT aLeRt*~.

The stunt is called the Black Rat Café, and it’s happening at the San Francisco Dungeon, a California performance hall that takes customers through San Francisco’s history via a guided tour hosted by professional actors. While the tour typically focuses on events from the Gold Rush to Alcatraz, the Dungeon’s Matthew Clarkson told Eater, “The bubonic plague section [of the Dungeon] got us thinking about what we could do with rats.”

And so they decided to go with a rat café, naturally. The website describes the pop-up as an immersive experience where “guests can sip their coffee while seated at bistro-style tables, nicely draped with red and white gingham table clothes … all while being surrounded by rats.” Mmm.

The café is only happening on July 1 and July 8, and tickets cost $50. While it might sound like a ripoff, you do get unlimited coffee, tea, and pastries. All of the food, none which is prepared on site, will be cleared before the rodents are let in, according to Eater.

Clarkson also told Eater there’s no need to alert the authorities, saying, “We’re obviously following all the food code and hygiene requirements.” (Cosmopolitan.com has reached out to the San Francisco Department of Public Health for comment and will update this post when they respond.)

If the whole experience leaves you feeling excited about rats, you can even go ahead and adopt one. The rodents in The Dungeon are being provided by Rattie Ratz, a California-based rat rescue and adoption agency that started in 1998 and has since housed 250 domestic pet rats.

Clarkson told Eater that rats make for good pets — and that “if looked after, they’re as clean as a cat or a dog.” The more you know!

For more food news and magical recipes, follow Cosmo Bites on Facebook!

Follow Danielle on Instagram and Twitter.

Article source: http://www.cosmopolitan.com/food-cocktails/a9874227/rat-cafe-san-fransisco-dungeon/

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A Café Is Charging $50 to Drink Coffee Surrounded by Rats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 21, 2017 in Rat News
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A pop-up café that is purposely filled with rats (purposely filled with rats!!!!) is about to open, and you can go there if you’d like rodents to crawl on your toes over nice conversation with your friends. ~*DaTe NiGhT aLeRt*~.

The stunt is called the Black Rat Café, and it’s happening at the San Francisco Dungeon, a California performance hall that takes customers through San Francisco’s history via a guided tour hosted by professional actors. While the tour typically focuses on events from the Gold Rush to Alcatraz, the Dungeon’s Matthew Clarkson told Eater, “The bubonic plague section [of the Dungeon] got us thinking about what we could do with rats.”

And so they decided to go with a rat café, naturally. The website describes the pop-up as an immersive experience where “guests can sip their coffee while seated at bistro-style tables, nicely draped with red and white gingham table clothes … all while being surrounded by rats.” Mmm.

The café is only happening on July 1 and July 8, and tickets cost $50. While it might sound like a ripoff, you do get unlimited coffee, tea, and pastries. All of the food, none which is prepared on site, will be cleared before the rodents are let in, according to Eater.

Clarkson also told Eater there’s no need to alert the authorities, saying, “We’re obviously following all the food code and hygiene requirements.” (Cosmopolitan.com has reached out to the San Francisco Department of Public Health for comment and will update this post when they respond.)

If the whole experience leaves you feeling excited about rats, you can even go ahead and adopt one. The rodents in The Dungeon are being provided by Rattie Ratz, a California-based rat rescue and adoption agency that started in 1998 and has since housed 250 domestic pet rats.

Clarkson told Eater that rats make for good pets — and that “if looked after, they’re as clean as a cat or a dog.” The more you know!

For more food news and magical recipes, follow Cosmo Bites on Facebook!

Follow Danielle on Instagram and Twitter.

Article source: http://www.cosmopolitan.com/food-cocktails/a9874227/rat-cafe-san-fransisco-dungeon/

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Pet a Rat and Sip Coffee at SF’s New Rodent Cafe – Eater SF

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 20, 2017 in Rat News
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Somebody call the health department: A squeal-inducing, bizarro version of the cat café trend, a new pop-up called The Black Rat Café, is headed to San Francisco. Whereas KitTea Café in Hayes Valley and Cat Town in Oakland let patrons meet and adopt cats over coffee, tea, and snacks, the rat café will do the same with rodents.

The stunt comes from the tortured souls at The San Francisco Dungeon in Fisherman’s Wharf, who insist there’s no need to alert the authorities. “We’re obviously following all food code and hygiene requirements,” the Dungeon’s Matthew Clarkson tells Eater. For $50 per person, participants will be led into the basement of the Dungeon, set up with tables, tablecloths, and lanterns — “it is quite dark in our dungeon,” says Clarkson. There, they’ll be served coffee, tea, and pastries, but all food — none of it prepared on-site — will be cleared out before the rats scurry in.

Providing the rat “talents” are the genuine rat lovers of Rattie Ratz, a Clayton, California-based rat rescue and adoption agency who have housed 250 domestic pet rats since their founding in 1998. “They do make very good pets,” Clarkson adds, “and if looked after, they’re as clean as a cat or a dog.”

On typical tours of the SF Dungeon, which opened in 2014, families shuffle from room to room as actors perform scenes inspired by San Francisco’s Barbary Coast period overlaid with special effects. “The bubonic plague section [of the Dungeon] got us thinking about what we could do with rats,” Clarkson explains, and eventually, they landed on the rat café concept. “People in the Bay Area love to celebrate food, and they’re always looking for the next thing to wait in line for,” he jokes.

Article source: https://sf.eater.com/2017/5/17/15655260/rat-cafe-san-francisco

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‘It was a rattling success!’ – Pet rat charity event takes place in Meldreth

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 19, 2017 in Rat News
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PUBLISHED: 08:29 19 May 2017

Xan, seven,  with his rats Foxtrot and Tango. Picture: Boo Newns

Xan, seven, with his rats Foxtrot and Tango. Picture: Boo Newns

Boo Newns

Rats were the focus of the event in Meldreth.Rats were the focus of the event in Meldreth.

The National Pet Initiative event ran at the village hall and was attended by more than 100 people, who went along to talk rats with other owners, or to find out more about caring for the creatures.

Organiser Mary Giles, from Meldreth, said: “It was a rattling success!

“Feedback left by attendees showed that everyone had learned something from their visit, and 75 per cent loved the day so much they would come back to another and recommend it to their friends.

“It was non-stop in the cuddle corner, and those rats had a wonderful time meeting the visitors.

There were plenty of rats to handle. Picture: Dory ValentineThere were plenty of rats to handle. Picture: Dory Valentine

Mary said the demonstrations and QA session were particularly popular, with standing room only for some.

“The rats waiting at home for their owners to return were going to enjoy the purchases made from Rat Rations, and the NPI stall, along with treat toys made in the activities corner,” she added.

Cambs-based Xan Newns, seven, was over the moon and incredibly proud to discover his two rats Foxtrot and Tango had been placed second and and third in the show out of an entry of 20.

If you think you may be interested in keeping pet rats, see website www.nationalpi.org or email chairman.nationalpi@gmail.com for further information.

Article source: http://www.royston-crow.co.uk/news/it-was-a-rattling-success-pet-rat-charity-event-takes-place-in-meldreth-1-5025141

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Pet a Rat and Sip Coffee at SF’s New Rodent Cafe

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 18, 2017 in Rat News
Closed

Somebody call the health department: A squeal-inducing, bizarro version of the cat café trend, a new pop-up called The Black Rat Café, is headed to San Francisco. Whereas KitTea Café in Hayes Valley and Cat Town in Oakland let patrons meet and adopt cats over coffee, tea, and snacks, the rat café will do the same with rodents.

The stunt comes from the tortured souls at The San Francisco Dungeon in Fisherman’s Wharf, who insist there’s no need to alert the authorities. “We’re obviously following all food code and hygiene requirements,” the Dungeon’s Matthew Clarkson tells Eater. For $50 per person, participants will be led into the basement of the Dungeon, set up with tables, tablecloths, and lanterns — “it is quite dark in our dungeon,” says Clarkson. There, they’ll be served coffee, tea, and pastries, but all food — none of it prepared on-site — will be cleared out before the rats scurry in.

Providing the rat “talents” are the genuine rat lovers of Rattie Ratz, a Clayton, California-based rat rescue and adoption agency who have housed 250 domestic pet rats since their founding in 1998. “They do make very good pets,” Clarkson adds, “and if looked after, they’re as clean as a cat or a dog.”

On typical tours of the SF Dungeon, which opened in 2014, families shuffle from room to room as actors perform scenes inspired by San Francisco’s Barbary Coast period overlaid with special effects. “The bubonic plague section [of the Dungeon] got us thinking about what we could do with rats,” Clarkson explains, and eventually, they landed on the rat café concept. “People in the Bay Area love to celebrate food, and they’re always looking for the next thing to wait in line for,” he jokes.

Article source: https://sf.eater.com/2017/5/17/15655260/rat-cafe-san-francisco

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These pet owners just can’t let go

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 17, 2017 in Rat News
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When Alli Highley’s beloved Nala died last March, family members set up a viewing at a Seattle-area funeral parlor, Resting Waters, so that family members who weren’t present at the time of death could say their final goodbyes.  Nala arrived in a casket filled with flowers and the family requested that music be played — soft rock, Nala’s favorite.

Nala was a dog.

Pets are basically family these days, and we spend accordingly. In 2017, it’s estimated we’ll spend almost $70 billion keeping them happy and healthy with the latest toys, nutritious food, veterinary care and fashion-conscious grooming — $10 billion more than in 2015. Toward the end of a pet’s life, spending on care like surgeries and treatments can skyrocket. It makes sense: Nobody wants to think about their beloved pet dying. Yet while we do everything we can to prolong their lives, we rarely have any plans for when they pass away.

Joslin Roth, one of the owners of Resting Waters, a pet funeral home in Seattle, Wash., would like to change that.

“This is something we’re always thinking about,” she says. “How do you talk about a topic that makes people so uncomfortable and sad?”

Roth, along with her sister Darci Bressler, opened Resting Waters hoping to give pets the same love and dignity in death as their owners showed them in life. Unlike the traditional vet-based cremation model, Resting Waters allows families insight into and control over the entire process, offering a full range of services from funerals, memorials and viewings to aquamation, a water-based cremation alternative.

Soft rock, Nala’s favorite music, was played at her viewing.Darci Bressler and Joslin Roth / Resting Waters

A hound named Red came to Resting Waters for the aquamation service, which costs anywhere from $175 to $375, plus potential transport and witnessing fees. “He had an immense fear of fire,” Roth says, “and his family couldn’t bear the idea of traditional cremation because they didn’t want to put his body through something that was so bothersome to him during his life.” Aquamation is a kind of hyper-decomposition — it mimics the way the ecosystem breaks down organic matter, and is considerably friendlier to the environment than standard cremation.

Most of Bressler and Roth’s clients find them via the internet or word of mouth.

“We opened Resting Waters to work directly with the public,” Roth says. “Many of the families who choose us for aftercare bring us their deceased pet directly because they want more time to say goodbye and cannot imagine someone else performing the transportation.”

Resting Waters also offers resources for the grieving process, connecting clients with photographers who do “final days” photoshoots or artists who create pet portraits and memorial tattoos. “When it comes to mourning art, the options are unlimited; if you can think of it, we can find an artist who does it,” Roth says.

‘I loved seeing photos of her skinned body.’

 – Lauren Mann, who had her cat taxidermied

One of these artists is Lauren Kane, owner of Precious Creature Taxidermy in California. Resting Waters’ relationship with Precious Creature began when Roth needed a taxidermist for her cat, Ghetta. “After a lot of phone calls, it became clear that most taxidermists were not interested in helping with companion animals,” she says. Christian Harding, a Seattle taxidermy and oddities store owner, pointed her in the direction of Precious Creature.

“I’m asked at least once a day for services like Resting Waters and Precious Creature,” Harding says. Having a pet taxidermied isn’t for everyone — other options Harding suggests are having the bones processed and cleaned and having the skeleton assembled for display. Prices vary depending on the type and size of pet, as well as the service — preserving a medium-sized dog’s coat could cost about $400, while preserving the full body of a cat could range from $1,900 to $3,000. Hairless animals cost more because they need to be airbrushed, and every lump and wrinkle needs to be resculpted to perfection. Kane even offers preservation of pet rats for $350 to $650. One might think that those interested in these services are death-obsessed or morbid, but Harding says that isn’t the case at all. “It’s typically very normal, everyday people. It’s what they need to go through the mourning process.”

“Most of my clients are folks you’d see at the grocery store without batting an eye,” agrees Kane. “Everyone grieves differently.”

For the last two years, she has been working with pet owners to find the option that brings them the most peace, whether that’s full-body taxidermy or a cleaned skull to place under glass. Like Resting Waters, Precious Creature depends on word of mouth and social media for new clients; on an Instagram account that now has 14K followers, Kane regularly shows photos of the aftercare process. Initially, Precious Creature would taxidermy one to three pets a year; now that the business is more established, Kane sees at least three to five a month, plus multiple inquiries each week from people.

Samantha, a cat Precious Creature preserved last year, was brought in by Lauren Mann. Mann first started thinking about pet taxidermy while watching the 2012 documentary “The Queen of Versailles”; in one scene, the film’s subject shows off her deceased dog, stuffed and encased in glass.

“I had always felt that Samantha was too precious to be cremated,” Mann says. “I didn’t want her in a faraway pet cemetery I would probably rarely if ever visit.”

When Samantha was diagnosed with kidney failure in 2014, Mann and her husband dedicated themselves to making the remainder of their cat’s life as comfortable as possible. They took her to get vanilla frozen yogurt at the McDonald’s drive-through, bought her a pet goldfish, and let her watch fish YouTube videos on her own iPad. Having Samantha taxidermied was an easy decision. “When Samantha returned home, it was a complete joy,” Mann says. “Not only did I feel good to have her back in the house but I felt as though this was an incredible piece of art that had so much meaning.”

Lauren Mann had her cat Samantha taxidermied.Lauren Mann

Not everyone felt the same way about Samantha’s 10th life.

“As I started telling people I would get her stuffed, they thought I was joking,” Mann says. “I loved seeing photos of her skinned body. Soon I realized the photos I found crazy, wonderful and hilarious did not warrant the same responses in others. When I showed friends the photos of dead Samantha being skinned, there were shrieks of horror and disgust. When I went to Sundance, Paul Dano asked how Samantha was doing and when I told him ‘dead’ and showed him the photo of Samantha’s disemboweled body, he cringed.”

Taxidermy isn’t the only option. Heather Mitchell Braatz, who lives in Milwaukee, chose another route for her cat, Poopy. In 2004, when Braatz was in art school and Poopy was a kitten, she saw a cat skeleton in a Chris Schneberger photo exhibit.

Heather Mitchell Braatz had her cat Poopy articulated.Heather Mitchell Braatz

“It was super awesome,” she remembers. When it was time to decide what to do with Poopy’s remains, Braatz and her husband found a vendor on Etsy to perform an articulation. “Cremation’s terrible for the environment,” Braatz says. There’s a green pet cemetery a few hours away, “but I’d never visit that far north.” And it’s against city regulations to bury pets in your back yard where she lives. Plus, whenever Poopy was naughty, she used to joke that she would boil his bones and keep him under glass. Though he wasn’t boiled (that turns bones yellow), an articulated Poopy does now occupy a place of honor in Braatz’s house. “I think everyone but my mother-in-law was pleased that he turned out nicer than they had expected,” Braatz says. “I was kind of surprised by how many people were concerned that he was going to smell bad when he came back. He didn’t even smell like glue! It was great … My husband and I are super thrilled that he’s home.”

Displaying the family pet’s corpse on the mantle isn’t always a comfortable topic.

Braatz doesn’t exactly hide her articulated Poopy.Heather Mitchell Braatz

“Death is no fun to think or talk about,” Kane acknowledges. “It gives me a pit in my stomach just thinking about my whippet Laika someday passing away.”

Still, Kane believes it’s important to consider what you’ll want to do when the time comes. Whether one opts for something traditional like burial or an alternative option like aquamation, taxidermy or articulation, having a plan in place can help ease the pain of loss and turn grief into something meaningful.

“The moment everything was organized, I felt instant peace,” says Mann, Samantha’s owner. “I am going to be OK because Samantha will always be with me — literally.”

Article source: http://nypost.com/2017/05/16/these-extremely-loving-owners-preserve-their-pets-for-eternity/

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Amanda’s View: Colosseum and memoriam

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on May 16, 2017 in Rat News
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Amanda’s View: Colosseum and memoriam

By Amanda Knox

Approaching Century Link Field in a throng of green-and-blue people, flanked by an ecstatic marching band, I couldn’t help but think about the Roman Colosseum, and how sporting events have been experienced by humans in the exact same way for as long as civilization has existed. The same spirit of adrenaline-spiked tribalism that motivates Seattlites to show up in droves to watch grown men skillfully kick a ball around motivated the Romans to show up in droves to observe the clashing of gladiator against gladiator, Christian slave against starved lion.

We are the same. As Tim Urban wrote recently on Wait But Why, if you were to swap a newborn from a Medieval farming village with a newborn New Yorker today, no one would know the difference. That’s because the modern human brain hasn’t evolved in over 10,000 years. Some evolutionary psychologists think our brains are the same as those belonging to humans from as far back as 50,000 years. For context, that’s the stone age, around about the time humans invented the needle.
It’s not often that I’m reminded of this fact. At the game, what triggered me were the rules and the rituals, the pomp and performance. Not being a regular sports viewer, I felt like a foreigner. The real Sounders fans knew how and when to hold up their scarves as banners, to call out the players’ last names during announcements, to call back during the marching band’s chants. I gawked at the parade of flag bearers followed by the parade of uniformed children escorting the players onto the field, at the fireworks which punctuated the beginning and end of each half, and at the Mad-Max-style flame-throwers blasting out of the tops of the goal posts. I thought: the only difference between us and the Mesoamericans from 2000 B.C. is that we don’t decapitate the losing team at the end of the ballgame. But we are totally those people. We live for the show.

This week, Chris and I had to say goodbye to our pet rats, Ruthie and Yoyo. They were both over two years old and had developed tumors, as rats do. Ruthie in particular was acting sluggish and her fur was standing on end—from pain, we guessed. On our way out to Kent (to one of the few remaining veterinary hospitals which accept non-cat-or-dog patients), we mentally prepared ourselves to accept that Ruthie and Yoyo’s time had come.

It didn’t come as a surprise, then, when the vet recommended euthanasia. What did come as a surprise was how casual and routine the whole visit was. How, when the vet picked up our babies’ cage to take them away, it didn’t feel like we weren’t going to get them back. When the vet asked if she could keep Ruthie and Yoyo’s cage for a litter of newborn weasels, Chris and I didn’t expect to feel so…empty.

We speculated about this on the way home. Was it because Ruthie and Yoyo were just rats, which, like fish, don’t ping our attachment instincts as much as cats and dogs do? But that didn’t sound right to me. I thought of how, back in the early 2000s, people used to cry out, “Wilson!” making fun of that scene from Cast Away. Except, I’d bet many of those same people, viewing that scene within the context of the film, would have bawled their eyes out, just like I did. Humans are attachment machines, whether or not the object of our attachment is sentient or cute or even alive. Chris and I loved our rats.

Only when thinking back to the Sounders Colosseum did it occur to me what was missing when we had to tell Ruthie and Yoyo goodbye: The process was unceremonious. Without even the smallest gesture of ceremony, it didn’t feel like saying goodbye.

It didn’t feel like saying goodbye until Chris tweeted their epitaph. He wrote: “2 years ago, I bought some rats for my book launch party. I made them a house out of copies of my book, ripped up pages as the bedding. When the paperback came out, Ruthie (full name: Notorious RBG) helped me navigate the maze of anxiety to find the Coors Light of peace. Yoyo (full name: Yolandi Vi$$er) chewed through my stereo cables, my cell phone charger, and my heart strings. Never thought I’d own rats. A lark became an unexpected joy. Today, I said goodbye. They’re still close to my heart. RIP Ruthie Yoyo.”

And it was a relief to feel tears in my eyes.

Article source: http://www.ballardnewstribune.com/2017/05/15/opinion/amandas-view-colosseum-and-memoriam

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