Scratch from pet rat kills California boy

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 20, 2014 in Rat Answers
Closed

The tragic death from “rat-bite fever” of a 10-year-old San Diego boy highlights the risk carried by the pet rodents, according to a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Rat-bite fever is a rare but potentially fatal illness that should be considered in persons with rash, fever and joint pain, and when a history of rodent exposure is reported,” said a team led by Dr. Jessica Adam of the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service.

The case outlined in the report occurred in August of 2013. Adam’s team said the boy, previously healthy, first developed a fever of 102.6 degrees and “experienced rigors, fevers, vomiting, headaches and leg pains.”

His doctor initially diagnosed the illness as infection with a gastrointestinal virus. But “during the next 24 hours, the patient experienced vomiting and persistent fever. He was confused and weak before collapsing at home,” the CDC report said.

By the time paramedics reached the boy he was “unresponsive,” and he died in a hospital emergency department.

Blood tests and autopsy reports revealed infection with Streptobacillus moniliformis, a potentially deadly germ that causes rat-bite fever and “can be transmitted to humans through rodent bites or scratches; approximately one in 10 bites might cause infection,” according to the CDC authors.

Adam and her colleagues said that the boy had two pet rats: the first one tested negative for S. moniliformis, but the second, recently acquired, tested positive. “The autopsy report noted that patient had been scratched by his pet rats,” the researchers said.

Adam’s team suggested that rat-bite fever could be under-reported because the condition does not have to be reported to health authorities in the United States.

Trying to determine its overall incidence, they looked through hospital records in San Diego County for 2000-2012 and found 16 cases during that time period, which did not include the one fatal case involving the 10-year-old in 2013.

“Most infections (94 percent) were pet-associated,” the team noted. “One patient had an occupational exposure (rat breeder). Sixteen of 17 patients reported exposure to rats. Of these, 44 percent reported only having handled a rat, 38 percent reported being bitten and 13 percent reported a scratch.”

Based on the findings, Adam’s team said that doctors need to be alert to rat-bite fever when symptoms occur, and they stress that “nearly all domestic and wild rats carry S. moniliformis.”

Quick treatment is crucial, because even though rat-bite fever is treatable with antibiotics, fatalities do occur in about 13 percent of untreated cases.

The researchers also stressed that a scratch or bite from the rat isn’t necessary for transmission, since infection can occur “through ingestion of food or water contaminated with the bacteria.”

Their advice to owners of pet rats? “Wear gloves and wash their hands thoroughly after handling rats or cleaning rat cages, avoid rat secretions and promptly seek medical care if they have rat-bite fever symptoms after contact with rats.”

The findings are published in the Dec. 18 issue of the CDC journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Article source: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/scratch-from-pet-rat-kills-california-boy/

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Pet Rat Scratch Kills Child; CDC Warns of Risk

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 20, 2014 in Rat News
Closed

Pet Rat Scratch Kills Child; CDC Warns of Risk


Listen to this page using ReadSpeaker

By EJ Mundell

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Dec. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) — The tragic death from “rat-bite fever” of a 10-year-old San Diego boy highlights the risk carried by the pet rodents, according to a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Rat-bite fever is a rare but potentially fatal illness that should be considered in persons with rash, fever and joint pain, and when a history of rodent exposure is reported,” said a team led by Dr. Jessica Adam of the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service.

The case outlined in the report occurred in August of 2013. Adam’s team said the boy, previously healthy, first developed a fever of 102.6 degrees and “experienced rigors, fevers, vomiting, headaches and leg pains.”

His doctor initially diagnosed the illness as infection with a gastrointestinal virus. But “during the next 24 hours, the patient experienced vomiting and persistent fever. He was confused and weak before collapsing at home,” the CDC report said.

By the time paramedics reached the boy he was “unresponsive,” and he died in a hospital emergency department.

Blood tests and autopsy reports revealed infection with Streptobacillus moniliformis, a potentially deadly germ that causes rat-bite fever and “can be transmitted to humans through rodent bites or scratches; approximately one in 10 bites might cause infection,” according to the CDC authors.

Adam and her colleagues said that the boy had two pet rats: the first one tested negative for S. moniliformis, but the second, recently acquired, tested positive. “The autopsy report noted that patient had been scratched by his pet rats,” the researchers said.

Adam’s team suggested that rat-bite fever could be under-reported because the condition does not have to be reported to health authorities in the United States.

Trying to determine its overall incidence, they looked through hospital records in San Diego County for 2000-2012 and found 16 cases during that time period, which did not include the one fatal case involving the 10-year-old in 2013.

“Most infections (94 percent) were pet-associated,” the team noted. “One patient had an occupational exposure (rat breeder). Sixteen of 17 patients reported exposure to rats. Of these, 44 percent reported only having handled a rat, 38 percent reported being bitten and 13 percent reported a scratch.”

Article source: http://www.webmd.com/children/news/20141218/scratch-from-pet-rat-kills-child-cdc-warns-of-risk

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Scratch From Pet Rat Kills Child; CDC Warns of Risk

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 19, 2014 in Rat News
Closed

THURSDAY, Dec. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) — The tragic death from “rat-bite fever” of a 10-year-old San Diego boy highlights the risk carried by the pet rodents, according to a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Rat-bite fever is a rare but potentially fatal illness that should be considered in persons with rash, fever and joint pain, and when a history of rodent exposure is reported,” said a team led by Dr. Jessica Adam of the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service.

The case outlined in the report occurred in August of 2013. Adam’s team said the boy, previously healthy, first developed a fever of 102.6 degrees and “experienced rigors, fevers, vomiting, headaches and leg pains.”

His doctor initially diagnosed the illness as infection with a gastrointestinal virus. But “during the next 24 hours, the patient experienced vomiting and persistent fever. He was confused and weak before collapsing at home,” the CDC report said.

By the time paramedics reached the boy he was “unresponsive,” and he died in a hospital emergency department.

Blood tests and autopsy reports revealed infection with Streptobacillus moniliformis, a potentially deadly germ that causes rat-bite fever and “can be transmitted to humans through rodent bites or scratches; approximately one in 10 bites might cause infection,” according to the CDC authors.

Adam and her colleagues said that the boy had two pet rats: the first one tested negative for S. moniliformis, but the second, recently acquired, tested positive. “The autopsy report noted that patient had been scratched by his pet rats,” the researchers said.

Adam’s team suggested that rat-bite fever could be under-reported because the condition does not have to be reported to health authorities in the United States.

Trying to determine its overall incidence, they looked through hospital records in San Diego County for 2000-2012 and found 16 cases during that time period, which did not include the one fatal case involving the 10-year-old in 2013.

“Most infections (94 percent) were pet-associated,” the team noted. “One patient had an occupational exposure (rat breeder). Sixteen of 17 patients reported exposure to rats. Of these, 44 percent reported only having handled a rat, 38 percent reported being bitten and 13 percent reported a scratch.”

Based on the findings, Adam’s team said that doctors need to be alert to rat-bite fever when symptoms occur, and they stress that “nearly all domestic and wild rats carry S. moniliformis.”

Quick treatment is crucial, because even though rat-bite fever is treatable with antibiotics, fatalities do occur in about 13 percent of untreated cases.

The researchers also stressed that a scratch or bite from the rat isn’t necessary for transmission, since infection can occur “through ingestion of food or water contaminated with the bacteria.”

Their advice to owners of pet rats? “Wear gloves and wash their hands thoroughly after handling rats or cleaning rat cages, avoid rat secretions and promptly seek medical care if they have rat-bite fever symptoms after contact with rats.”

The findings are published in the Dec. 18 issue of the CDC journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More information

Find out more about rat-bite fever at the American Academy of Pediatrics.

– E.J. Mundell

SOURCE: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Dec. 18, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Article source: http://www.philly.com/philly/health/topics/HealthDay694809_20141218_Scratch_From_Pet_Rat_Kills_Child__CDC_Warns_of_Risk.html

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I've disgraced myself. Do I quit?

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 18, 2014 in Rat Answers
Closed

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The good news is she has gone on to a stellar media career, despite her notorious workplace legacy. And no rats were injured.

But can anyone recover from A-grade workplace embarrassment?

Sabina Read

Sabina Read

Will that undies-tucked-into-skirt-while-photocopying-a-phonebook clanger fade over time (or haunt your career’s every move)?

Chris Strode firmly believes it is possible to turn a big black mark against your name into a big black bank balance.

The founder of Invoice2go was fired for being too drunk at his previous employer, Macquarie Bank’s Christmas party in 2004.

“I was very drunk, which in itself was no reason for losing my job, but in my inebriated state I went back to the office after hours and that action breached a rule deemed worthy of dismissal,” Strode recalls.

A decade later Strode knows it is possible to live-down humiliation at work, even use it to give you a “shot in the arm” to make positive change.

“Obviously in my case, I had burnt my bridges in that industry because everyone knows everyone but, in hindsight, getting drunk and being fired for it was a turning point that ultimately advanced my career.

“I could finally dedicate myself full-time to developing my invoicing app, something I had been tinkering with for a while as a hobby on a share website; today it has more than 120,000 paying customers and is the market-leading invoicing app worldwide.”

Strode has evidently never looked back from embarrassing himself in the workplace. But not everyone will be as fortunate, warns workplace specialist Will Snow of commercial law firm Finlaysons.

Smartphones and social media didn’t exist a decade ago and the silly season’s alcohol-fuelled corporate soirees can be ripe territory for shameful antics.

“Christmas parties are rife with potentially embarrassing situations, with the most common social missteps including over-drinking and abusing the boss, harassing a colleague or taking embarrassing photos “all of which are now magnified with the prevalence of digital technologies”.

“This can have significant impacts for business,” Snow says. “It’s a potent combination when a few drinks collide with the year’s bottled-up work tensions and then a permanent record of unfortunate images is created or derogatory comments posted about the company or colleagues, resulting in significant damage to reputation.

“When employees get on social media during the night or the day after, issues can get heated and spread quickly, often before managers have a chance to address them.”

One of the biggest mistakes employers make is not setting the right example themselves and then not taking complaints seriously.

“Most workplaces have behaviour policies in place but it’s no good if these policies are not understood by everyone, or followed by those in charge,” Snow says.

But the good news is embarrassing yourself at work does not necessarily make you a workforce leper.

According to Sabina Read of Sabina Read Psychology, embarrassment is commonly linked to breaching a social norm, as opposed to breaking a moral code of conduct.

Focus on “putting your offence in perspective”, Read recommends. “First up, be kind to yourself – you may have pushed the limits of social convention but chances are you are still a law-abiding citizen.”

In the first 48 hours, owning up to your cringe-worthy behaviour will help damage control, she says.

“In order to minimise your own embarrassment, proactively apologise in a genuine and professional manner to those who were directly affected by your actions … [then] let it go.

“Avoid posting a company-wide email asking everyone for their opinion or plastering apology memos in each toilet cubicle, which may make a bigger deal of the event than is warranted.”

There is no doubt public embarrassments leave us feeling self-conscious and vulnerable.

But Read says “its anthropological purpose is to highlight what we could do differently next time”.

Your career prospects can be saved by using social discomfort as “a welcome ally” to remind us not to repeat questionable habits.

“It’s human to slip up and lose control sometimes but it’s how you handle the aftermath of such an event that speaks volumes about you as a person and an employee/employer. While not everyone tries photocopying their bare behind at the Christmas party … rest assured embarrassment visits all of us at the workplace sometimes.”



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Article source: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/small-business/managing/ive-disgraced-myself-do-i-quit-20141217-12753z.html

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Woman’s pet rats multiply and overtake her home

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 18, 2014 in Rat News
Closed


Share The Grio


Share The Grio

(Fox 13 Tampa)(Fox 13 Tampa)

(Fox 13 Tampa)

St. Petersburg, FL — It all started when two pet rats escaped.

A Florida woman has 300 to 500 rats roaming through her home. When two of her pet rats escaped and started multiplying, she didn’t have the heart to fumigate or lay traps.

“I want to save them,” she explained and said that they are practically family.

She called the SPCA, but they did not have room for all the rodents. Now, her entire house smells of rat droppings, and she has no idea how to fix the problem humanely.

“Everyone hates them but I just want to give them love,” she says. “Everyone says bad things about rats and I’ve never been sick or had any diseases or anything.”

Article source: http://thegrio.com/2014/12/17/womans-rats-home/

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St. Pete woman faces dilemma after rats overrun home

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 17, 2014 in Rat Answers
Closed

ST. PETERSBURG (FOX 13) –

With hundreds of rodents running loose in her house, a St. Pete woman knows she has a problem. But no one can quite agree on how to help Florine Brown.

“The rats have taken over,” she admitted. “They are in every room, pretty much, in the house.”

The SPCA estimates there at 300 to 500 rats inside the home on 10th Avenue South. Brown said they are practically her family — or at least their earlier relatives were.

Click here to share this video on YouTube

She said it all started with a handful of pet rats two years ago, until some escaped. The rats did their thing, and pretty soon, a few rats had turned into a few hundred.

Browns said she called the SPCA a year ago seeking help, but the agency told her they didn’t have room for the rodents. She didn’t have the heart to fumigate.

“I want to save them,” she explained.

Now the home is filled with feces and the odor is overpowering. Brown, 29, doesn’t know what to do. She’d like to humanely trap and remove the squeaky squatters, but that’s easier said than done.

“Everyone hates them but I just want to give them love,” she added. “Everyone says bad things about rats and I’ve never been sick or had any diseases or anything.”

Josh Cascio will have more on the FOX 13 News tonight.

Article source: http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/story/27597067/st-pete-woman-faces-dilemma-after-rats-overrun-home

Tags: , , , , ,

Florida woman’s home overrun by hundreds of pet rats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 17, 2014 in Rat News
Closed

ST. PETERSBURG (CNN/WFLA) — A Florida woman’s pet rats have overrun her home.

Florine Brown says she suffers from depression and her pet rats were a comfort to her until they got out of hand, CNN affiliate WFLA reports.

She started off with three rats, but they kept multiplying by breeding. There are now hundreds of rats behind every nook and cranny.

They are inside the walls, ceiling, drawers, furniture and even her stove.

But the stench is overwhelming.

A family member reportedly called local animal rescue groups to report the hoarding and to get the rats removed.
Florida woman’s home overrun by hundreds of pet rats

Article source: http://www.cbs12.com/news/top-stories/stories/vid_21252.shtml

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Woman lives with 300 pet rats

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 16, 2014 in Rat Answers
Closed

A Florida woman lives in a home inundated with over 300 pet rats. WFLA reports.

If your browser has Adobe Flash Player installed, click above to play. Otherwise, click below.

Article source: http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/us/2014/12/11/dnt-woman-has-300-pet-rats.wfla.html

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500 Pet Rats Occupy Woman’s Home [Video]

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 16, 2014 in Rat News
Closed

500 Rats Occupy Woman's Home as Pets Considered Family

A woman in St. Petersburg, Florida has hundreds of rodents running around in her home. She considers these rats family but admits they have taken over. With nearly 500 rodents occupying every room of the house located on 10th Avenue South, Florine Brown has come to understand she has a problem.

The SPCA has estimated there are anywhere from 300 to 500 rats living with the 29-year-old woman. She started out with just a handful of rats for pets about two years ago, but some escaped. The remaining rodents began to multiply and before she knew it a few turned into hundreds. Brown reached out to the SPCA for assistance a year ago, but they could not handle all of the rodents and their owner did not have the heart to fumigate. Brown said:

I want to save them, everyone hates them but I just want to give them love. Everyone says bad things about rats and I have never been sick or had any diseases or anything.

Now Brown’s house is filled with feces from the rodents and the odor has taken over. She does not know what to do. Ridding her home of the pets is easier said than done; she would like to find a way to humanely trap and remove them without bringing any harm to the rodents she considers family.

Brown is not alone in her love of rats. According to a woman named Laura, who runs Northern Lights Rattery, these rodents make really good pets. This company is a small rattery based in Wick, Northern Scotland. Laura has an entire site dedicated to the care, pros and cons, responsibilities and everything necessary for people to consider before acquiring these animals as pets.

The first thing Brown missed in this lesson is rats need to live in wire cages with at least two square feet of space per rat. They are very social so they require at least one hour of free-range play outside of the cage. Laura added:

Rats are very destructive, they will chew wires, curtains, bedding, carpets and furniture if given half a chance. They are also territorial and will “scent mark” their owner and their stuff when they are out of the cage. If you do not like the idea of rats peeing on you, then do not get rats!

According to Laura’s website, rats are very intelligent and can learn to follow orders such as use a litter tray and perform tricks. They each have a distinctive personality and are very friendly, said Laura. When they see their owner they climb the cage in excitement begging to come out. Even when they have the entire room to roam around in they still spend a great deal of time just climbing all over their owner. Laura added:

When I sit on the floor with mine during their free-range time they will climb all over me, on my head, shoulders and even in my clothes.

According to Northern Lights Rattery rats have a short lifespan of two to three years. Just like other animals they can suffer from a number of different ailments which can shorten their years such as respiratory problems and tumors. When they are not healthy they can rack up a large amount of money in vet bills.

Laura seems to understand how Brown feels. The rat owner stated she could not see herself without them; their friendly and mischievous little personalities have won her over. Florine Brown will no doubt miss these rodents immensely if she ever gets the courage to rid her home of these pets she considers family. They have taken over and she is seeking help to eliminate them from her home while saving their lives.

by Cherese Jackson (Virginia)

Sources:

Fox News
Northern Lights Rattery
Rats In Action

Main Photo Credit: Fox 13

Featured Photo Credit: Flickr Amanderson2

Article source: http://guardianlv.com/2014/12/500-pet-rats-occupy-womans-home-video/

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Florida woman faces dilemma after rats overrun home

Posted by Big Rat on Campus on Dec 15, 2014 in Rat Answers
Closed

ST. PETERSBURG (FOX 13) – With hundreds of rodents running loose in her house, a St. Pete woman knows she has a problem. But no one can quite agree on how to help Florine Brown.

“The rats have taken over,” she admitted. “They are in every room, pretty much, in the house.”

The SPCA estimates there at 300 to 500 rats inside the home on 10th Avenue South. Brown said they are practically her family — or at least their earlier relatives were.

Click here to share this video on YouTube

She said it all started with a handful of pet rats two years ago, until some escaped. The rats did their thing, and pretty soon, a few rats had turned into a few hundred.

Browns said she called the SPCA a year ago seeking help, but the agency told her they didn’t have room for the rodents. She didn’t have the heart to fumigate.

“I want to save them,” she explained.

Now the home is filled with feces and the odor is overpowering. Brown, 29, doesn’t know what to do. She’d like to humanely trap and remove the squeaky squatters, but that’s easier said than done.

“Everyone hates them but I just want to give them love,” she added. “Everyone says bad things about rats and I’ve never been sick or had any diseases or anything.”

Article source: http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/story/27606003/florida-woman-faces-dilemma-after-rats-overrun-home

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